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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > to cut or not to cut. that is the question.
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Thread: to cut or not to cut. that is the question. Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-28-2013 08:23 PM
captain jack
Re: to cut or not to cut. that is the question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VallelyJ View Post
I confess to not having read every post, so pardon the possible redundancy.
A Beckson-style deck plate would be the cat's a** here.
I've seen them in catalogs with a cloth bag that sets into the hole.
I'd think that you could also glass in a bottom and aft end and create a small storage locker that way. Needn't be neat or finished-looking. Nobody will poke their head in.
The peace of mind you'd get knowing that your cleats are properly fastened and backed will probably be worth the effort even if you don't make a storage space. It's crazy not to have access to fastenners. And using McGyver tricks as others have suggested would work but it's often hard to know for sure how well you've secured the fastenner.
I've installed a number of those deck plates and it's easy. Just bed them with something that won't harm the plastic.
JV

yeah. that's the kind of access panel i was talking about.
12-28-2013 07:31 PM
RichH
Re: to cut or not to cut. that is the question.

An alternative to my first recommendation, is to use extra long machine screws, "coupling nuts", and threaded rod stock. Drill down from the topside into the bottom structure of the coaming; then, counterbore the hole made in the bottom surface to allow passage of the threaded rod and attached 'coupling nut' to pass. Add nuts and washers, Caulk & Torque it all home and youre done.

Coupling nut: Coupling Nuts, Fasteners
12-28-2013 07:09 PM
hellosailor
Re: to cut or not to cut. that is the question.

Ergh, because they're pockets in the cockpit coaming.

"Coaming

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Coaming (Originally "Coaning",) is any vertical surface on a ship designed to deflect or prevent entry of water. It usually refers to raised section of deck plating around an opening, such as a hatch. Coamings also provide a frame onto which to fit a hatch cover.

The protective metal sheeting or plating protecting against water entry into ventilator shafts in large ships is called a coaming as it suits this purpose.

The term was borrowed by the aviation industry to refer to a low rim around the opening for an unenclosed cockpit.

In addition, it is the vertical surface rising from a hatch, which forestalls the ingress of water and provides a sealing surface for the hatch cover.

Coaming also refers to the raised structure around the cockpit of a kayak."
12-28-2013 06:18 PM
azguy
Re: to cut or not to cut. that is the question.

Off topic, but.......why are they called coaming pockets...???
12-28-2013 06:13 PM
hellosailor
Re: to cut or not to cut. that is the question.

Cut the cleat, clear it out. See what's beneath it, i.e. any backing plate.

You may very well be able to install the new one by using LONG bolts, so they protrude down to an accessible area, and then using a basin wrench to hold the new nut on until you can get it threaded up.

If you've never seen a basin wrench, it is a "WTF did that break off?" kind of tool that plumbers use to reach up into the narrow space behind a sink, in order to tighten up the inaccessible nuts on the bottom of faucet fixtures. One size fits all, they're spring loaded to tighten down, and they'll easily go a foot or more "up" into an inaccessible pocket.

If you want to install coaming pockets, they're very useful. But if you just need access...I think a basin wrench, under ten bucks at the hardware store, is all you'll need. Or, long bolts, so you can get the nut started by hand, and then just have to screw it up several inches.
12-28-2013 06:01 PM
Seaduction
Re: to cut or not to cut. that is the question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by captain jack View Post
the cleat isn't the only issue or that might be a thought. i still need to replace that screw in the rail base, though.
Apologies. I missed the screw needed for the stern rail (pushpit). Hope you figure it out.
12-28-2013 04:47 PM
VallelyJ
Re: to cut or not to cut. that is the question.

I confess to not having read every post, so pardon the possible redundancy.
A Beckson-style deck plate would be the cat's a** here.
I've seen them in catalogs with a cloth bag that sets into the hole.
I'd think that you could also glass in a bottom and aft end and create a small storage locker that way. Needn't be neat or finished-looking. Nobody will poke their head in.
The peace of mind you'd get knowing that your cleats are properly fastened and backed will probably be worth the effort even if you don't make a storage space. It's crazy not to have access to fastenners. And using McGyver tricks as others have suggested would work but it's often hard to know for sure how well you've secured the fastenner.
I've installed a number of those deck plates and it's easy. Just bed them with something that won't harm the plastic.
JV
12-28-2013 01:07 AM
captain jack
Re: to cut or not to cut. that is the question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ccriders View Post
Is that a fuel tank vent on the sloping side aft of the stantion? If so, can you remove it and get a wrench onto the nut in question?
John
i pulled that off, already, to check. it is a vent of some sort but it's only 1/4" in diameter.
12-28-2013 01:05 AM
captain jack
Re: to cut or not to cut. that is the question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Seaduction View Post
Rivet nuts won't provide the safety and strength of a backing plate.
probably true. they do rely on the stength of the material they are installed in.
12-27-2013 07:39 PM
ccriders
Re: to cut or not to cut. that is the question.

Is that a fuel tank vent on the sloping side aft of the stantion? If so, can you remove it and get a wrench onto the nut in question?
John
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