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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation > Using a temporary mooring
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Thread: Using a temporary mooring Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-25-2007 07:25 PM
burlesque Take a long, heavy line Attach one end to a cleat coil the remainder, hanging on to the end. When near enough, lasso the buoy - the line will sink, looped around the mooring chain. Haul in and make fast at your leisure. Can even be done from the cockpit. In strong winds/currents or if there is still way on the boat you can lose your boathook too easily. Under sail always pick up a buoy when it's on on the windward side or you risk a gybe!
04-09-2007 10:33 AM
sailingdog LOL... I bet you were told... and in not such polite language..

Quote:
I do love Rockland though. I can't remember the name of the hotel that's across from the police station, but the restaurant there has awesome steamers and chowder. Also, that food stand in the parking lot at the dinghy dock has great lobster rolls! Why does it seem that most of my favorite cruising spots seem to be ranked based on the quality of food available???
Can you see your toes without bending over... no??? then that might explain it...
04-09-2007 10:25 AM
labatt
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
Ouch.. and D'oh... I'm surprised no one ever told you...
Oh... we got told.. quite extensively after we dragged

We entered the harbor at dusk in August and the field was almost completely filled. This was a close in mooring right across the channel from the dinghy dock and it was getting pretty dark so we just grabbed it. At around 6am we got the hail from the boat next to us who we lazily drifted in to (no thuds, scratches or anything - we were lucky). After he explained to us the system, we quickly moved to another mooring in the field that was sized correctly.

An hour later, the guy from the "rental" company that owned the mooring came out and yelled at us for not calling the number on the mooring the night before. We quickly tried to explain that we moved there only an hour earlier but he didn't care. We ended up paying for two moorings that morning - the original one plus a little (since we didn't want to cheat the guy who owned the original mooring and he would have to reset it) and the one we were on for 3 or so hours (it was easier than dealing with a pissed off mooring owner).

I do love Rockland though. I can't remember the name of the hotel that's across from the police station, but the restaurant there has awesome steamers and chowder. Also, that food stand in the parking lot at the dinghy dock has great lobster rolls! Why does it seem that most of my favorite cruising spots seem to be ranked based on the quality of food available???
04-09-2007 07:36 AM
sailingdog Tenuki-

that is correct... all a mooring really is, is an anchor of some sort with a permanently attached rode, that you connect your boat to. Scope is generally less of an issue, since the scope should have been set when the mooring was placed. Some mooring anchors, like the Helix Screw anchors, require less scope than others... The three anchors set in an equilateral triangle type mooring also doesn't require all that much scope, since much of the scope is already laid out along the bottom, where the three anchors are joined at a swivel.
04-09-2007 03:51 AM
tenuki Attach mooring to stern per other thread about anchor attachment and stability? I'm assuming any reasons not to would also apply to anchoring? Or does the mooring ball, line angles and such change the equation?
04-08-2007 08:34 PM
sailingdog Labatt-

Ouch.. and D'oh... I'm surprised no one ever told you...
04-08-2007 07:40 PM
labatt The only other things to make sure of is that the mooring you are picking up isn't for a particular size/displacement. Most places are "one size fits all", but Rockland Harbor, for example, has a number of different sized moorings for different sized boats. We didn't realize until we dragged into another boat overnight... "Ahoy!"
03-27-2007 02:23 PM
sailingdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor
"The bleach bottle idea.. I would put it on a cement block or something, and leave it out. "

How about, put it on a lobstah pot, and check for dinner while you're out there?
Works for me...
03-27-2007 01:55 PM
hellosailor "The bleach bottle idea.. I would put it on a cement block or something, and leave it out. "

How about, put it on a lobstah pot, and check for dinner while you're out there?
03-26-2007 11:58 PM
sailaway21 I try to sail on, and off, my mooring. Admittedly, I do not have other boats near me, and so, why not? One thing I have picked up from this may be of use. When under power, I approach the mooring ball the same as I would under sail. I refer to speed and set/drift here. As a result of this approach, I always have my lunch hook made ready. When the engine fails, or the prop is fouled, you'll be in the same situation as if you came in under sail-without the sails to bail you out. The sail area of the boat alone is enough to ruin your day in that situation, having an anchor ready will allow you to regroup before you're aground or swapping glass.

I prefer picking up from the bow, single-handing, if possible. All the bad things that can foul are aft of midships. Mis-judging your approach, and realizing it while on the bow, means back to the cockpit for adjustment or another approach. Mis-judging while trying to pick up from aft may mean getting blown down across the mooring and fouling on keel or worse. But it is sometimes the only way to do it while alone.

An idea not mentioned yet, and rarely seen done for reasons that escape me, is making a pass through the mooring. A dry run, if you will. Motor on in, cut the motor where you think appropriate, and see how she handles. The unseen tide may be doing things to you that the visible wind is not. If everything is going "just ducky", hook the mooring and be done with it. If things are looking a little squirelly, make a mental note on a different approach on the next pass. Too many make the mistake of thinking they're Sir Francis Drake picking up his mooring off the Lizard with the monarch watching. The minor caution involved in a couple of passes is nothing to the chagrin felt when things go really bad, as illustrated by TrueBlue's experience.

The bleach bottle idea is excellent. I would put it on a cement block or something, and leave it out. Then, each time you go out, you can stop on the way in and pick up your "mooring", under a variety of conditions. IMHO, this will give you a lot better practise than just spending a whole morning under static conditions will.

I second the opinion of practising alone. Another person along, even just standing by the anchor, will make you behave differently. Maybe the first couple times, but then ditch them and practise on your own.
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