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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > mooring bouys
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Thread: mooring bouys Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-12-2009 08:28 AM
sailingdog Be aware that a 45' trimaran is going to have considerably more windage than a 45' monohull, and as such will need to have a larger ground tackle/mooring setup to compensate for that fact.

I wouldn't go by what other people have used, since most people I have seen go undersized with their mooring gear, and that's why boats break free during storms.

Maine Sail had a good post on mooring systems earlier, and referenced Hamilton Marine's info on it... I'll quote it here:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Maine Sail View Post
#1 Big heavy chain gives good caternary effect and prevents shock loading.

#2 Moorings are usually designed at a 2:1 or 3:1 max scope so this means heavy chain is a must if you want any caternary and protection from shock loading.

#3 Chain wears where the links meet. Anchors are not constant duty but moorings are. Moorings are exposed to wear & link degradation 24/7 365.

#4 The biggest chain, or wire diameter, you can buy will last you the longest.

#5 Galvanized chain adds no real long term benefit as the link wear chews through it rather quickly anyway so self colored chain is fine.

#6 Long link mooing chain is a good option because shackle fit better through it.

#7 You should have a top chain and a bottom chain. the top chain will be lighter than the bottom chain. A good rule of thumb is that the bottom or really heavy chain be 1.5 times max water depth. You will replace the top chain every three to four years depending on your location but bottom chain can last as long as 7-10 if big enough..


Feel free to watch this video and you'll see the types of mooring conditions boats in Maine can deal with in the winter and during Nor' Easters. Most boats up here use the Wayne Hamilton mooring protocol as shown bellow. None of the boats in the video broke free despite a few of them having 15 footers breaking over them. One actually rolled about 80 degrees and popped back up but did not break free.
Please ignore my video skills..

Enjoy...

Why Not to Cut Corners On Your Mooring System (LINK)


Photo Courtesy of Hamilton Marine (LINK)



This is my bottom chain for a 36 footer..
01-08-2009 10:39 PM
billyruffn One of the important functions of a mooring ball is to support the mooring rode. If the rode is nylon line you could probably use a bleach bottle. If it's 1/2" chain and the water's 80 feet deep you'll need a good sized ball to keep the mooring on the surface. Two other important considerations are the "shock absorber" role of the ball when the rode is pulled tight (energy is absorbed when the ball is forced under water) and visibility (you've got to find it at night).
01-08-2009 09:22 PM
erps Here's a decent article right here on Sailnet:

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-m...g-systems.html
01-08-2009 08:59 PM
imkashmo Hi Ray,
Thanks so much for your response, its amazing how little information there is about boating here in Hawaii even though there is a fairly large boating community. I'll have to do some diving/swimming to figure out the other moorings. The harbormaster didn't have a clue as to what the other boats had as moorings even though he inspected them. I'll check into the Helix system but will probably have to have it shipped since "officially" there are no mooring experts in Hawaii.

Thanks again!

Limon
01-08-2009 08:59 PM
imkashmo
Re: Mooring Ball Installation - Kaneohe, Oahu

Hi Ray,
Thanks so much for your response, its amazing how little information there is about boating here in Hawaii even though there is a fairly large boating community. I'll have to do some diving/swimming to figure out the other moorings. The harbormaster didn't have a clue as to what the other boats had as moorings even though he inspected them. I'll check into the Helix system but will probably have to have it shipped since "officially" there are no mooring experts in Hawaii.

Thanks again!

Limon
01-08-2009 08:49 PM
erps
Quote:
Originally Posted by imkashmo View Post
Hi There,
I'm installing a mooring system in Kaneohe Bay on Oahu, Hawaii. Its 40 Feet deep, mud/sand bottom. Windward side. Having to submit a diagram, just wanted to see if anybody had experience doing this? Its a 45 Foot Trimaran, 20 Foot Beam (18 ton displacement -according to my research). Mainly need to source the materials. There are already 54 personally installed moorings at the site but nobody has bothered to put up a blog or info.

imkashmoATgmailDOTcom
That's a big boat to keep off the beach. If it were me, I would put on the mask and snorkel and take a look at what the others in the bay are doing. Although the moorings I've used have been concrete blocks, they've been for smaller boats in a more protected area.

If I were in your spot, I think I would check locally to see if anyone is installing the helix mooring rods. If they were not available, I would start checking to see if I could get a hold of some used railroad wheels to string together two or three with some B.F. chain tying them together and then some smaller chain coming off the bottom with an underwater float holding it off the bottom and then some 1 inch nylon rope up to my mooring ball. There are some folks advocating the use of large mushroom anchors here as well that appear to hold very well once they are buried. A check of the moorings around you may give you an idea whether a mushroom anchor would work for you.
01-08-2009 07:32 PM
imkashmo Hi There,
I'm installing a mooring system in Kaneohe Bay on Oahu, Hawaii. Its 40 Feet deep, mud/sand bottom. Windward side. Having to submit a diagram, just wanted to see if anybody had experience doing this? Its a 45 Foot Trimaran, 20 Foot Beam (18 ton displacement -according to my research). Mainly need to source the materials. There are already 54 personally installed moorings at the site but nobody has bothered to put up a blog or info.

imkashmoATgmailDOTcom
03-30-2007 09:52 AM
RickBowman sailingdog,
You're correct. There is one installer in Michigan, and if you don't live in the southwest part of the state then "rotsa-ruck," <====== Chinease for "abandon all hope", as the install invloves hydraulics on a floating platform making a single Helix install price prohibitive.
03-30-2007 09:01 AM
sailingdog Hamiam-

While I agree that the mooring ball can help reduce shock loading on the boat, if the underwater portion of a mooring system isn't properly designed and sized, it really doesn't matter much... the first time the winds or seas pick up, the boat is toast. He doesn't say what the underwater portion of the mooring consists of.

Helix anchors, properly installed are far better than pyramid or mushroom anchors. However, not all places have people competent to install a helix anchor.
03-30-2007 12:53 AM
hamiam i would suggest looking into a dor-mor pyramid shaped moorings. offers alot of holding power for the weight. also, if memory serves, the mooring ball is actually an important element of the system as it reduces shock loads.
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