SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Boat differences
 Not a Member? 


Thread: Boat differences Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
05-01-2007 04:12 PM
rheaton You can also take courses at US Power Squadron United States Power Squadrons® [Boating Education: Public Classes + Member Courses = Safe Boating]. They offer a safety couse which outlines basics about boats, regulations, navigation, and safety. Very reasonably priced and offered locally. Best of luck.
05-01-2007 03:24 PM
Giulietta LIS, that is good..now go to school and learn that my boat is not FAT!!!!OK??

Its beamy!! Beamy!!

Cam's fat....
05-01-2007 03:15 PM
longislandsound Contacted a few recommended sites, will be checking next weekend.

Thank you guys.
04-30-2007 04:02 AM
yohosail Good on ya Jeff, don't let these fartlickers waste your blog space with their childish non issue posts. Thick skinned is one thing, being a dumbass to a new dude is uncool.

Yep, never too late to learn sailing. I really started when I was 29, bought a little folkboat and never really knew anything about owning your own boat except that I wanted one. Never looked back. Best way to learn is just what you're doing - website and talk to people. You'll find that you don't have to have a lot of money to sail, you can join race clubs and sail as "rail meat" (term for crew) and learn a lot in a short amount of time. There are the rich sailors and there are also the real sailors. These are the people that live aboard their vessels. They will tell you more about a boat than you can imagine. One of the best places to learn about the mechanics of a boat is to wonder around a haul out yard and talk to people there. Just looking at a boat hauled out of the water and chatting with the owner reveals an extraordinary amount. Talking to people at the dock or haul out will open up a wealth of books, personal experience, stories, advice etc.

I found that once I had a boat, cause non of my friends did, that a whole new world opened up. Get ready for the adventure of a lifetime, sailing is something you can do till you're 80 if you wanted to. You don't have to have a lot of money to learn, I dont and I learnt almost everything I needed from books, from other sailors taking me out on my boat etc.

Check out this cool little book called "twenty small boats to take you anywhere" I think it is by John Vigor, don't quote me.

Cheers.
04-30-2007 12:15 AM
cardiacpaul Again, wander the docks at your local marina. Talk to the people on the sailboats. We're a cranky opinionated bunch, but will never turn down a request to talk about boats.
04-30-2007 12:01 AM
sailingdog Giu's boat would be a Yugo...
04-29-2007 09:43 AM
longislandsound
Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie
Jeff... try:
wfcsailingschool

You can also seasonally rent boat time from them once your are certified.
I would also recommend taking the USCG Auxillary sailing course as it will teach you a lot of the basics of sailboats and coastal navigation.

You're 28 so I will make the perhaps unwarranted assumption that $$ will be an issue and would caution you that buying a boat is only the beginning of the expense. Be sure you can afford the docking/mooring costs, the haulout costs, and annual maintenance costs and insurance costs before you plunk your $$ down. Since you live in Commack...you might also consider the Peconic Bay as a place to keep a 1st boat as it is well protected and prices are lower out there. Getting a trailerable is also an option if you have a place for the trailer.

Are you looking for 1 boat to buy that will let you learn to sail on LIS and be capable of taking you to the Caribe...or are you looking at moving up to a seaworthy boat down the road? Big difference in both price and what I would recommend to you if you are looking for a 1 boat solution.
Thanks for the kind help and links Cam, exactly what I was looking for.

My problem was that I thought different boat types would also require different learning procedures, where a cruiser would be a more complicated boat, and a racer a simpler boat…boy was I wrong…race boats…hmmmm. Not yet….maybe never.

Having that, I do want and can afford my own boat, I have been doing searches on Yachtworld, based on what you guys seem to be recommending here, but will not buy one until I made up my mind, and in fact verified if I am really cut for sailing.

Then, if I am, I’ll rent, and rent and rent, then buy. I can save time and money by buying only one boat, that satisfies my needs in the end, and that will depend on how and when I will eventually get there.

Thank you for your help.

(That European boat is still on my mind though, if it were a car, what would it be?)
04-29-2007 09:26 AM
camaraderie Jeff... try:
wfcsailingschool

You can also seasonally rent boat time from them once your are certified.
I would also recommend taking the USCG Auxillary sailing course as it will teach you a lot of the basics of sailboats and coastal navigation.

You're 28 so I will make the perhaps unwarranted assumption that $$ will be an issue and would caution you that buying a boat is only the beginning of the expense. Be sure you can afford the docking/mooring costs, the haulout costs, and annual maintenance costs and insurance costs before you plunk your $$ down. Since you live in Commack...you might also consider the Peconic Bay as a place to keep a 1st boat as it is well protected and prices are lower out there. Getting a trailerable is also an option if you have a place for the trailer.

Are you looking for 1 boat to buy that will let you learn to sail on LIS and be capable of taking you to the Caribe...or are you looking at moving up to a seaworthy boat down the road? Big difference in both price and what I would recommend to you if you are looking for a 1 boat solution.
04-29-2007 08:25 AM
longislandsound Soysset?? Cool..

Cam, I use the Port Jeff ferry many times a week and got used to see the sailboats. My life is stable now, so why not start now?

I'd like to start sailing around the sound for starters, then, slowly move up, and fulfill my dream…sail to and from the Caribbean. That’s all I want. At this stage this is all new to me.

I did a little search with the word sail, and came across this site. Everyone here seems so experienced, I love it. I also love the boats I see here.

How would you recommend I should start, and do you know of a nice school around here? Thanks

Jeff
04-26-2007 10:50 PM
camaraderie LIS...SYOSSET (home port) here. Don't worry we won't let the Portagee or the other furriners steer ya wrong. Pamlico resides in my current home state...is a nice guy and making fun too. We take a little gettin' used to around here.
I was at the Mets FIRST opening day! Go Mets!!

Now...back to the subject at hand. What exactly are you looking to do on sailboats...learn to sail something small...race...cruise LIS on weekends alone...cruise with family...buy a boat and head to the islands....cross an ocean etc.. Knowing your ambition...what you want to learn...what you want to do...your budget and timetable will help us give some useful advice rather than the scattershot stuff you've gotten so far.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:43 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.