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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Standing rigging replacment
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Thread: Standing rigging replacment Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-26-2007 08:08 PM
camaraderie Yeah...he's ben called lots worse!! (G)
04-26-2007 08:05 PM
sailingdog No worries Newport 41..
04-26-2007 06:24 PM
Newport41 My apologies for the typo sailingdog. Didn't mean to call you saildog.
04-26-2007 06:23 PM
Newport41 Saildog,
You are correct, the reason the sails don't roll reef well is completely because of the cut of the sails. They just weren't designed for it. They aren't modified hank ons but they don't have foam in the luff and due to the cut and a little bit of age they catch more air when reefed than they should. I personally don't like to reef a jib either, I prefer to have the right sail up for the conditions, but that's just me. We are doing away with the furler due to it's age, it's not a reputable brand, and if it does fail there's nothing else other than the foil keeping the mast out of my cockpit. I also agree that wire is better than rod for cruising. The worry I have now with the rod is that although it "looks" alright, I've seen rod fail without warning before. Atleast wire looks tired berfore it fails and it is more easily replaced. I don't want to turn this into a rod vs. wire debate, it's just a matter of preferance. On the other side of that argument thought, a tall rig like ours is stronger, more easily tuned, and (as Hellosailor pointed out) worth more for resale if it had rod. I would opt for rod if it costed the same but it doesn't so I'm looking at the pros of wire. Let's face it, if your rig fails, it's going to fail with little warning.
Hellosailor-
I wouldn't compare wire rigging to a gas engine. There are pros and cons to wire other than cost. There are NO pros to a gas engine on a cruising boat other than cost. NONE. But your point about resale is well noted.
04-26-2007 02:17 PM
hellosailor SD- There is always one weaker/weakest piece of rigging on a boat. Even if the are all the same, the loads on them are different so one is "weaker" based on working loads on them.

IIRC there are fittings that can be used with rod rigging as well, I know I've read recommendations to keep one extra piece, as long as the longest in the rigging, on board with rod rigged boats. Wouldn't do much good unless it could be attached, right?

There's one other thing not mentioned here. If you replace rod rigging with wire, when it is time to sell the boat you may take a loss offsetting the savings. What you are doing is replacing a diesel engine with a gasoline one: Cheaper, but not what the buyer expects to find on that boat, or her sister ships. It might be worthwhile having a shop inspect the end fittings and give you some options, before junking the rod rigging and replacing it with the cheaper option of wire.
04-26-2007 09:45 AM
SimonV
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
Simon-

I don't think it is wise to have one piece of rigging that is significantly weaker, heavier or stretchier than the rest of the rigging on the boat. It will cause the rest of the rigging to fatigue more quickly IMHO. Also, the fittings for the terminal end are a bit different for rod rigging compared to wire rigging IIRC.
SD

Donít forget we are talking about an emergency; in an emergency I would even use a rope halyard to relive the strain on the rig.
04-26-2007 07:14 AM
sailingdog Simon-

I don't think it is wise to have one piece of rigging that is significantly weaker, heavier or stretchier than the rest of the rigging on the boat. It will cause the rest of the rigging to fatigue more quickly IMHO. Also, the fittings for the terminal end are a bit different for rod rigging compared to wire rigging IIRC.
04-26-2007 03:10 AM
SimonV
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
Pigslo-

Very true... it is far less stretchy... and higher strength... but if you're cruising, carrying a spare wire rope stay as long as the longest piece of rigging you've got, and some swageless terminals is pretty easy to do. Carrying an equivalent piece of rod rigging that can substitute for any failed piece is not really possible.
SD

There is nothing stopping you from replacing a broken rod with wire in an emergency. IMHO
04-26-2007 12:49 AM
sailingdog Pigslo-

Very true... it is far less stretchy... and higher strength... but if you're cruising, carrying a spare wire rope stay as long as the longest piece of rigging you've got, and some swageless terminals is pretty easy to do. Carrying an equivalent piece of rod rigging that can substitute for any failed piece is not really possible.
04-26-2007 12:37 AM
pigslo Most catastrophic failures are without warning, SD. The modern rod rigging does not have the closed in heads of the the early days. When my rigger rebuilt mine he used new open tangs so it is not prone to crevice corrosion. And it is hard to beat for adjust it and forget it as it is not prone to stretch like wire. Also can be sized smaller for equal strength....
pigslo
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