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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > starboard?
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Thread: starboard? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-11-2007 09:20 AM
christyleigh
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailormann
I don't think you have to worry unless you have screwed something into the Starboard. It will definitely not hold, but if you are through-bolting, you'll be fine. It is pretty solid - would stand up well to compression, in fact, the flexibility might even work in your favour...
I'm well aware that hardly anything sticks to starboard which is why everything commercially made from starboard is screwed together. I have been making boxes, whatever holders, etc.... for years and never saw any inability of starboard to hold a screw
05-11-2007 08:58 AM
ereuter I did screw the flane to the starboard with wood screws. I'm not too worried about that though. The old seacocks were secured only by the flange on the thru-hull (no screws at all). I feel like the screws are only preventing it from rotating relative to the hull. I don't think there will be much force perpendicular to the starboard.

If it starts to leak, I'll just have to pull it out I guess. I think I'll be ok for now. Thanks for the responses...

Eric
05-10-2007 11:54 PM
Sailormann
Quote:
Should I be panicking? I sure don't have the time to redo the job before it goes in next week.
If you used enough 5200 to seal everything I don't think you have to worry unless you have screwed something into the Starboard. It will definitely not hold, but if you are through-bolting, you'll be fine. It is pretty solid - would stand up well to compression, in fact, the flexibility might even work in your favour...
05-10-2007 05:53 PM
sailingdog eric-

If you through bolted, then it probably doesn't matter much... if you used screws to hold the seacock to the starboard, then it might matter... I don't know how well 5200 sticks to Starboard... If the new through hulls are replacing old ones, they may not have had backing plates and may have a flat surface because the manufacturer designed in a solid fiberglass (not cored) section for the through-hulls specifically at that point in the hull. The interior on most hulls is curved, and from your description, it sounds like that may be the what the maker did.
05-10-2007 12:26 PM
Valiente Marine ply and epoxy is still a better bet, in my view, because you can "dry fit" various pieces and the ply will flex a bit.

Another option is finding an offcut of teak for a few bucks and sealing that.
05-10-2007 12:13 PM
ereuter I just installed 4 new thru-hulls using Starboard as backing blocks. Sounds like I got some bad advise. My seacocks are Marelon and the tabs with the screw holes are pretty wide. I cut my blocks a little larger than the required footprint of the tabs/flange. I roughed up the Starboard with some 80-grit sandpaper and bedding it with 5200 on both sides.

All of the parts of the hull where I installed valves are very flat. In fact, none of the old seacocks had backing plates and the flanges weren't screwed down to anything.

Everything feels really secure. Should I be panicking? I sure don't have the time to redo the job before it goes in next week.

Eric
05-08-2007 10:27 PM
sailingdog I agree that the Starboard is not a very good material for a lot of purposes. For some things, like cupholders, stern seats, and such... it seems to work well.
05-08-2007 10:23 PM
Sailormann I bought a sheet of Starboard three years ago for just under 300 dollars. I still have most of it. It is very hard to work with. Saws easily enough, but it feels like a big piece of polyethylene. It does not hold screws well - they cannot be tightened to any extent without stripping the material. It is very heavy, yet still very flexible - nowhere nears as stiff as wood.

The only thing that bonds it is a 3m product called Starweld, that costs 70 some odd dollars (Cdn) for about 2 ounces. I am not sure who uses it Starboard, and frankly, I am surprised that it has found a market. I bought 1/2 inch as I had originally thought it might be good material for a bulkhead on a friend's boat.

It did make a good shelf for the VCR in our master bedroom. I still don't know what to do with the other 30 square feet - perhaps I can buy more VCR's ???
05-08-2007 07:52 PM
Alden68 Don't forget you can buy AZEK and/or Fypon PVC lumber at any lumber yard which means you don't have to go to West I am sure it should never be used as a structural element but it is UV resistent, paintable (although you don't have to) any it can be shaped/sanded with everyday woodworking tools. AZEK comes in many widths and thicknesses and is even sold as a sheet good.
05-08-2007 07:42 PM
sailingdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H
Plywood is often used for backing plates, but as SailingDog notes, the plywood should be epoxy saturated once drilled for all of the fastenings. I would suggest using MAS epoxy since thier penetrating epoxy does not produce an amine blush, which with other brands may interfere with the bond between the sealant and the backing plate.

If your hull is cored the coring should be cut back and the core space filled with solid thickened epoxy. Another better solution is to cut away the inner skin and remove the core and then build up solid glass and epoxy, tapering out onto the inner and outer skins.

Which brings me to my favorite backing plate method, which is to simply build up layers epoxy and fiberglass with a tapered edge.

Jeff
Yup...but that requires a lot more effort than cutting a slab of marine ply and coating it in epoxy. The point about MAS expoy is a good one... unless you feel like washing off the amine blush after the epoxy cures.
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