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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Sailors beware
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Thread: Sailors beware Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-25-2014 09:03 AM
endoit
Re: Sailors beware

Perhaps the containers should be equipped with holes and plugs at the base and on top that would allow sinking after exposure to sea water?
02-25-2014 07:13 AM
Joel H.
Re: Sailors beware

Given the increased frequency and voracity of storms brought on by last century's 'anything goes' business model, what ever they're doing obviously isn't going to be enough.
If cargo was falling out of airplanes at the same frequency would we be placated by them saying "yes, we make sure we shut the hatch every time.........."
02-24-2014 09:55 PM
JonEisberg
Re: Sailors beware

Quote:
Originally Posted by rbyham View Post
It would seem fairly easy and affordable to develop a tie down system at least...
What, you think they're just stacking them up there, and letting them be?





From wiki:

Quote:
Numerous systems are used to secure containers aboard ships, depending on factors such as the type of ship, the type of container, and the location of the container.[33][34] Stowage inside the holds of fully cellular (FC) ships is simplest, typically using simple metal forms called container guides, locating cones, and anti-rack spacers to lock the containers together.[35] Above-decks, without the extra support of the cell guides, more complicated equipment is used.[33] Three types of systems are currently in wide use: lashing systems, locking systems, and buttress systems.[33] Lashing systems secure containers to the ship using devices made from wire rope, rigid rods, or chains and devices to tension the lashings, such as turnbuckles.[33] The effectiveness of lashings is increased by securing containers to each other, either by simple metal forms (such as stacking cones) or more complicated devices such as twist-lock stackers.[33] A typical twist-lock is inserted into the casting hole of one container and rotated to hold it in place, then another container is lowered on top of it.[36] The two containers are locked together by twisting the device's handle.[36] A typical twist-lock is constructed of forged steel and ductile iron and has a shear strength of 48 metric tons.[37]

The buttress system, used on some large container ships, uses a system of large towers attached to the ship at both ends of each cargo hold.[38] As the ship is loaded, a rigid, removable stacking frame is added, structurally securing each tier of containers together.[38]
02-24-2014 09:50 PM
titustiger27
Re: Sailors beware

This seems like it is ripe for a 'reality show'

Sea Storage Wars
02-24-2014 09:36 PM
rbyham
Re: Sailors beware

It would seem fairly easy and affordable to develop a tie down system at least...
02-24-2014 05:45 PM
Joel H.
Re: Sailors beware

Quote:
Originally Posted by HighTyde View Post
I would agree that the big steel containers aren't water-tight or water-proof and should fairly quickly fill with water and sink. Maybe someday future archeologists will find them and draw conclusions about our society.
Yes, the conclusion will be;...... That they allowed an obviously deeply-flawed, damaging, (and potentially/eventually life threatening), practice to continue effectively un-penalized, in the interest of cheap transport costs.

Hey, I've got a wild idea... DON"T stack them so damn high!
02-24-2014 05:35 PM
aa3jy
Re: Sailors beware

Quote:
Originally Posted by miatapaul View Post
Well they say this is the largest loss "on record." I am sure there have been others, just not on record. They did say 20 foot floats typically floats for three months before sinking, and a 40 footer for about 9 months. So I don't think I would say that is rather quickly. Refrigerated containers are generally inherently buoyant, so they can float for ever.
Every so often this subject pops up... First hand experience with the subject matter..

A legendary offshore danger - Ocean Navigator - March/April 2013

I took these pix about 15 or so years ago coming back on a delivery from the Virgin Islands and about 2 days out from the Chesapeake Bay entrance.

Clay
S/V 'Tango'
Chesapeake Bay
02-24-2014 02:56 PM
miatapaul
Re: Sailors beware

Quote:
Originally Posted by newhaul View Post
Link didn't work and just to let you know ships loose containers all the time most sink rather quickly
Well they say this is the largest loss "on record." I am sure there have been others, just not on record. They did say 20 foot floats typically floats for three months before sinking, and a 40 footer for about 9 months. So I don't think I would say that is rather quickly. Refrigerated containers are generally inherently buoyant, so they can float for ever.
02-24-2014 01:20 PM
HighTyde
Re: Sailors beware

Quote:
Originally Posted by newhaul View Post
Link didn't work and just to let you know ships loose containers all the time most sink rather quickly
I would agree that the big steel containers aren't water-tight or water-proof and should fairly quickly fill with water and sink. Maybe someday future archeologists will find them and draw conclusions about our society? Unfortunately, I'm guessing most of the containers are packed full of boxes of cheap giveaways and other plastic junk from China that we really don't need but can't seem to resist buying at Walmart or the local 99 cents store. The kind of stuff that never decomposes and will be around forever.
02-23-2014 08:35 PM
vtsailguy
Re: Sailors beware

If you find one, tow it home! Sell the Nike's!
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