SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail > Newbie wants to learn to sail
 Not a Member? 


Thread: Newbie wants to learn to sail Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
06-23-2007 11:33 PM
arbarnhart
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris_gee
[...]
On the ramp, landings have priority over launchings for obvious reasons.
[...]
On ramps that are busy (I have seen no other kind in the Summer on large inland lakes), there are often cars with trailers waiting in line for their turn at the ramp(s). When landing, you generally have to moor or tie to the dock out of the way, go get your vehicle and get in line behind everyone else; there is no special priority.
05-24-2007 03:47 PM
tenuki Remember, when docking, you can always add a touch of power, but you can't take power away. Move as slowly as possible!!!

To get a feel for how your boat moves, loosen the mooring lines a bit and then spend some time pushing her around. Notice how little effort is required to move her. Think of what that means in relationship to the outboard.

Then spend a lot of time out in clear water practicing using the motor to stop, spin, move forward slowly. Find how how slow you have to be going to lose tiller control. back up until you are comfortable with it and know how to manuver going backwards.

tip: if you do this near a boey (one not marking shoals or shallows of course!!) you can see your movement a lot better.

Then dock with the calm assurance that you probably now have more knowledge than then average docker. lol.
05-23-2007 12:32 AM
superdave Thanks for all the replies! I have to sound like an idiot for a minute here: I tried flaking the sail down before, and it really seems to slide around everywhere. I can't get the folds to be even, and the battens run at about a 30 degree angle from the folds. It really seemed difficult; I know I'm doing something wrong though. I tried lowering the halyard gradually while I gathered up folds, and single-handedly, this didn't work too well (my sail has a rib to hold it into the mast track, not separate sliders). When I take a bunch of sail down, I just have an unruly pile to try to flake. I may try Tenuki's burrito method!

All the other advice made perfect sense to me! My plan is to go from the dock out onto the lake for a while and practice some motoring to get a feel for the boat, and then when the marina looks quiet, begin trying to dock it in the slip. As long as it doesn't start taking on water, I think I'll be okay. I will probably have a hundred questions after the first day, though!

-Dave
05-21-2007 01:50 PM
werebeagle Dave

I'll give you a call later, but I might be able to come up Sunday Afternoon to help you out. I've got to check with the boss first.

Charlie
05-21-2007 01:42 PM
timebandit Be sure to check for overhead obstructions between where you set up and the ramp---that mast is a long way up!!!!
05-21-2007 01:32 PM
NOLAsailing If there are races held in your area, I would encourage you to volunteer yourself and a six pack as crew. There is no better way to quickly learn the fundamentals as well as meet other people interested in the sport.

When flaking your main, just start at the back of the boom and pull it over in folds that hand equally on each side of the boom. Pull each fold back as far as it will go. Because the sail narrows as you move towards the head, you'll find that each flake lies a little farther forward. Ties the sail with sailties every four feet or so. When you work your way to the mast, continue laying the sail on each side of the boom. You may need to do some tucking to get it to fit neatly under the cover. Take your mainsail halyard and clip if to your outhaul at the back of the boom so it does not bang against the mast.

As for docking, go slow and practice. Spend some time motoring around the harbor. Learn how quickly your boat turns around. Practice bringing it to a halt using reverse. Practice reversing. Does it back easier to stbd or port? Learn how to use that to your advantage.

As for launching at a ramp. Get the boat rigged and ready to go before pulling up to the ramp. Move the boat to the ramp. Tie a bow line to the trailer and remove the wire and safety chain. Back up just until the boat floats. You can step hard on the brake to slide the boat back a bit if you're driving into the water (this probably won't be an issue on your boat). Engage your parking brake and tie your boat off to the dock. Quickly park and move your boat out of the ramp area.

Have lots of fun.
05-21-2007 10:01 AM
werebeagle Dave

I think I sent you my number, but if you don't have it anymore, send me a PM, then I can give you a call. We can set up some time for me to come up there and I can get you started.

Charlie
05-21-2007 07:59 AM
rheaton You might want to check out some books and sailing instructional videos. We found some at our local library.
05-21-2007 07:39 AM
Allanbc
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenuki
3 basic ways:

3) 'bunch and tie' - I wasn't aware of this method until I moved into my new slip and took a look at the guy next to me. The sail cover was off and it looked like he just sort of took some bungie cords and wrapped them randomly about his doused main, hooking them nilly willy to different stuff. It sort of looks like my wife's hair right after she wakes up. I would not recommend this method, nor leaving a main uncovered all winter for birds to poop on and weird green stuff to grow on. I'll have to ask my boat slip neighbor why he chooses this method over the two above.
This is the only method that I have found that works with my main. I have a full batten, loose footed main. I flake the sail best I can and then bunch and tie to control it so it is small enough to fit under my sail cover.
05-21-2007 01:40 AM
tenuki
Quote:
Originally Posted by superdave
how do you wrap the mainsail around the boom to be temporarily stored under the cover?
3 basic ways:

1) 'Flaking the sail' - this is accomplished by making an 'accordion' fold starting from the foot of the sail and working up, usually using the sail attachment points as the pivots for the 'flakes'. It is easiest to do alone from the end of the boom away from the mast, probably standing in the companionway on your size boat. It is also easiest to do with 2 people but with practice can be done with one. Most sailors do this. I don't like it because it puts a 'fold' in the sail at exactly the same point every time and also seems excessively anal retentive.

2) 'rolling the sail' - this is done by taking a big swoop at the bottom of the main and just rolling up the remaining sail into it like a big burrito, try it, it will become obvious how to do it. I prefer this method myself, and it can be easily done with one person. It is a bit harder to do with full battens than with partial.

3) 'bunch and tie' - I wasn't aware of this method until I moved into my new slip and took a look at the guy next to me. The sail cover was off and it looked like he just sort of took some bungie cords and wrapped them randomly about his doused main, hooking them nilly willy to different stuff. It sort of looks like my wife's hair right after she wakes up. I would not recommend this method, nor leaving a main uncovered all winter for birds to poop on and weird green stuff to grow on. I'll have to ask my boat slip neighbor why he chooses this method over the two above.


Welcome to SailNet and to the greatest (in terms of time and money) sport on the planet.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:37 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.