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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > safe cooking
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-06-2014 04:42 PM
hellosailor
Re: safe cooking

Home Depot follows WalMart's pricing policy: Make a big deal over the sale items, charge full freight for everything else people might wander in for. BUT if you use a smartphone and a bar code app, and if you can find the same item elsewhere "locally" for less, HD also will give you the lower price plus another 10%.

So a word to the frugal sailor...Light bulbs, often 25% less at Lowes, HD will give you the lower price plus 10%. Shower heads and plumbing? Bed Bath Beyond is often 25% less (and they're never cheap!) and HD will give you the discount plus.

But you do have to ask for it, unless you get lucky & the Depoid helping you is anxious to keep your business, and offers to check the price for you. (G)
04-06-2014 01:21 PM
christian.hess
Re: safe cooking

but I still cooked in it...no need to change status quo on that boat as I didnt end up going anywhere with it...

like was pointed out a while back...

cheers
04-06-2014 01:17 PM
captain jack
Re: safe cooking

Quote:
Originally Posted by christian.hess View Post
I certainly had a stench initially when using my alcochol wick stove...that my folkboat came with...It quickly unsooted though and there are tricks to eliminate the initial stench...think it was you had to push the wick down and keep it soaked or something...cant remember that and clean the "burners" often

but it was something I could do and deal with...I was in berkeley in cool san fran weather most of the time for there it was fine...no issues...

but like all things its give or take or a compromise...
that sounds about right for a wick stove. i have heated the garage with kero heaters, the wick kind, for years. the wick has be properly saturated or they will smoke. of course, when they smoke, the CO levels go way up. they aren't all that safe, unless you make sure you have good ventilation, anyway....kero heaters of that sort, i mean.

anyhow, it makes sense that your wick alcohol heater would have opperated that way.
04-06-2014 12:12 PM
christian.hess
Re: safe cooking

I certainly had a stench initially when using my alcochol wick stove...that my folkboat came with...It quickly unsooted though and there are tricks to eliminate the initial stench...think it was you had to push the wick down and keep it soaked or something...cant remember that and clean the "burners" often

but it was something I could do and deal with...I was in berkeley in cool san fran weather most of the time for there it was fine...no issues...

but like all things its give or take or a compromise...
04-06-2014 12:09 PM
christian.hess
Re: safe cooking

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
Christian, if you can't find 'kerosene' trying asking for it under it's British name.

Paraffin Oil.

That might apply to other places outside of the US as well. "Kerosene" is a Colonial term, in fact a US trademark from 1854. It is not a material, it is a brand of material.

The way we baffle the world expecting to find a Kleenex (brand of facial tissue) or some Scotch (brand of self-adhesive cellophane) tape.



I would be surprised if the inefficient combustion from an unpressurized Origo stove was putting a higher amount of CO in the combustion products. Along with the gobs of water they put out. Someone who cares can look that one up. (G)
NOPE

its called gas...pure kerosene is a no go...tried to explain that

but thanks though...

I got really investigative for my motorcycle project and it was a no go...simply put kerosene like would be used for a cooker you couldt find...

diesel and the gas version of kerosene called solvente yes...it will work its just not feasible money wise...
04-06-2014 01:13 AM
zeehag
Re: safe cooking

what one SHOULD be able to find HERE in mexico and what one DOES find HERE in mexico SHOULD be same...HOWEVER there is no alternative fuel found in ferreterias which are hardware stores there is none in pemex. there is none in walmart nor costco. come to mexico and do OFFLINE and REAL research instead of sitting at your puter. you might find your god lies. not all you read on google is fact.
get down here and try to find your precious non propane stove fuel.
migjt possibly find some in baja, but NO where else.
04-06-2014 12:56 AM
MedSailor
Re: safe cooking

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobmcgov View Post
Sure.

Does your CO detector/meter run on batteries, or on 12V? That might be a piece of kit worth having.

Per the original topic: We just bought a solar cooker/oven for use in Mexico & have been messing about with it here in Wyoming. It's great for people with limited fuel who aren't in a hurry. I.e., cruizers. No noxious gasses, and you'd have to try pretty hard to make it explode. Bakes lovely bread.
That thing will give you melanoma in no time, and diabetes from all the bread. Sorry, unsafe too.

The CO detector is a kiddie nighthawk I think. Battery powered. Looks like walmart has them for 20. I paid a little more for mine at Home Depot (maybe $35?) and it was a slightly different model, but not by much.
04-05-2014 08:57 PM
bobmcgov
Re: safe cooking

Quote:
Originally Posted by MedSailor View Post
Now THAT is an excellent and certainly plausible answer. Thank you. I also haven't heard the word stoichiometry since high school chemistry. It's got a nice ring to it....

Thanks for the explanation. It makes sense to me.

MedSailor
Sure. Looks like many household demand heaters sold today have powered-fan vents, even for vertical runs. I would bet that's because they are more concerned with fast combustion rather than perfect combustion, and there's a fair bit of CO as a byproduct. Also, the stack air doesn't have time to heat up, so you may not get good drafting. At any rate, I could see demand heaters being problematic on a boat.

Does your CO detector/meter run on batteries, or on 12V? That might be a piece of kit worth having.

Per the original topic: We just bought a solar cooker/oven for use in Mexico & have been messing about with it here in Wyoming. It's great for people with limited fuel who aren't in a hurry. I.e., cruizers. No noxious gasses, and you'd have to try pretty hard to make it explode. Bakes lovely bread.
04-05-2014 08:37 PM
MedSailor
Re: safe cooking

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobmcgov View Post
Med: what's missing is makeup air. Demand hot water heaters tend to fire up like the afterburners on an F-14 Tomcat; they have to take cold water and heat it to 120F in about one second. And keep heating new water that comes thru & spends a mere eyeblink inside the heat exchanger. They use a lot of gas for short bursts of time, and they need lots of oxygen to make the stoichiometry work right. If you are breaking lots of carbon bonds w/out enuf oxygen present, you don't get CO2 -- you get CO. Incomplete combustion. While most boats are sufficiently vented and air-leaky to supply makeup air, a demand heater in a remote locker or under a cabinet might be oxygen starved. Our house uses a demand heater in a small basement, and I ran a standpipe into the attic to ensure it could pull sufficient makeup air. (That's why the vent on demand hot water heaters is often huge, too -- ours is 6". Lots of in, lots of out.)
Now THAT is an excellent and certainly plausible answer. Thank you. I also haven't heard the word stoichiometry since high school chemistry. It's got a nice ring to it....

Thanks for the explanation. It makes sense to me.

MedSailor
04-05-2014 08:15 PM
bobmcgov
Re: safe cooking

Quote:
Originally Posted by MedSailor View Post
Yeah, I'm not sure what to make of that. I saw an on demand hot water heater on a recent survey that wasn't vented and it's removal was recommended. There's something missing to this story because NONE of the propane stoves that I've ever seen are vented. I kept a CO monitor on my boat that gives numerical readings and it never registered a single PPM from my propane stove. Once it registered a bit from my kerosene Aladdin lamp when I didn't have it adjusted properly, but then again, that's kerosene.

MedSailor
Med: what's missing is makeup air. Demand hot water heaters tend to fire up like the afterburners on an F-14 Tomcat; they have to take cold water and heat it to 120F in about one second. And keep heating new water that comes thru & spends a mere eyeblink inside the heat exchanger. They use a lot of gas for short bursts of time, and they need lots of oxygen to make the stoichiometry work right. If you are breaking lots of carbon bonds w/out enuf oxygen present, you don't get CO2 -- you get CO. Incomplete combustion. While most boats are sufficiently vented and air-leaky to supply makeup air, a demand heater in a remote locker or under a cabinet might be oxygen starved. Our house uses a demand heater in a small basement, and I ran a standpipe into the attic to ensure it could pull sufficient makeup air. (That's why the vent on demand hot water heaters is often huge, too -- ours is 6". Lots of in, lots of out.)
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