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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Living Aboard > Downside of living aboard
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Topic Review (Newest First)
1 Hour Ago 08:35 AM
Sal Paradise
Re: Downside of living aboard

Brent you had me convinced until you said to stop smoking, boozing and chasing women.
2 Hours Ago 07:57 AM
miatapaul
Re: Downside of living aboard

[quote=Brent Swain;2804770]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tbone View Post
I am not fully moved into my new boat, a Pearson Vanguard, but I'm quite comfortable on it for long periods, and I don't need anything else. My only gripe about living aboard so far is waking up with a hangover when the wind is pounding or there's lots of boat traffic in the little bay where my marina is, and feeling more like crap than if I were on land with a hangover because my boat is getting bounced around at the dock. Other than that, I have no complaints that I can't do anything about.

Living aboard is not the problem. Boozing is.
The solution is simple and cheap.
STOP BOOZING!
Amazing how that eliminates hangovers .
Miraculous!
I think he was saying that he felt like he was hung over, not from booze but from the boat rocking. Note he says when the boat was rolling due to boat traffic. Basically sea sickness. No need to be so judgmental.
17 Hours Ago 04:42 PM
Brent Swain
Re: Downside of living aboard

Yep, including walking all the way up and down your gangway in the rain trying to carry groceries, or just get to work dry, living in a space with no insulation nor AC, leaking port holes, constant mold that has to be managed and all the other things regular humidity harms like framed pictures and guitars, etc.

And, you'll find your "I'll sail most day after work and every weekend" ideas don't materialize when it takes more than an hour to turn her from a home to a sailing vessel that won't break all your stuff on the first gust or big wave.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- No insulation is easy to resolve. Insulate the boat well, a must for comfortable living aboard in a cold damp climate. If done well , it keeps a boat super dry ,by eliminating condensation. Leaky ports ? Then bed them properly.
Some where on this site, someone mentioned spending a night on a Beneteau, the most damp and uncomfortable night he had ever spent.
Stock boats need a lot of added insulation, and an added heat source, to be liveable in a cold climate. They are made for pretty, not function.

My boat got musty when it was painted white. Painted her dark green, and the mold went away. Hull felt warm to the touch in the sun, on minus 12 degree days. Dried the lockers right out.
Wood stove helps a lot.
My interior is set up so I can set sail any time, without anything falling or breaking. Don't rig your interior like it is a house.
If your boat is not the most comfortable dwelling you have ever lived in, you are doing something wrong. It can be. There is a cure.
17 Hours Ago 04:24 PM
Brent Swain
Re: Downside of living aboard

[QUOTE=Tbone;2804098]I am not fully moved into my new boat, a Pearson Vanguard, but I'm quite comfortable on it for long periods, and I don't need anything else. My only gripe about living aboard so far is waking up with a hangover when the wind is pounding or there's lots of boat traffic in the little bay where my marina is, and feeling more like crap than if I were on land with a hangover because my boat is getting bounced around at the dock. Other than that, I have no complaints that I can't do anything about.

Living aboard is not the problem. Boozing is.
The solution is simple and cheap.
STOP BOOZING!
Amazing how that eliminates hangovers .
Miraculous!
17 Hours Ago 04:09 PM
Brent Swain
Re: Downside of living aboard

I have been living aboard my current boat for over 30 years. I built her in the summer of 1984 to my own design, a 31 ft steel twin keeler. With previous boats I have owned, I have lived aboard full time, for most of the last 45 years. I have for several years had the free use of a large house with a huge flat screen TV and all the comforts. Two days there and I cant wait to get back on my boat. I find land dwelling one of the most boring things imaginable.

My boat is the most comfortable home I have every had, Several of my clients have said the same thing about their boats.
Living aboard full time has saved me so much money that it enabled me to semi retire in my mid 20's, working about a month a year to acquire all the money I needed.
How so?
I NEVER pay moorage. I stay anchored. I see some paying more in moorage than my total cost of living.
Building my boat from scratch enables me to get things right the first time ,including getting enough epoxy on the inside of my boat, the most important paint you can ever put on a steel boat. Steel construction means zero deck leaks. Thick spray foam insulation ,and a good airtight wood stove, means a super warm, dry interior. Twin keels means being able to stay in drying anchorages for weeks on end, for free. A good rain water catchment means getting my water for free.
I have done only two haulouts in 31 years. I do all my own my work, on the beach at low tide when necessary. .
Don't drink ,don't smoke, don't do drugs, and don't chase women, drastically cutting my costs. Hunt and fish for groceries, drastically cutting my costs.
There is no way I could ever afford to live any other way, as cheaply.
When I built my first boat, it was worth the same amount as a house. Now they are giving boats away, and a house costs a million bucks.
I am meeting a lot of young people lately, especially young women, who realize the only way they could ever afford their own home is if it is a boat. What a change! In my 20s all the women I met wanted nothing to do with boats.They were locked on two goals, real estate and making babies.
Great to see them enjoying such freedom, and valuing it. Great to be able to pass on what I have leaned over the decades.
19 Hours Ago 02:25 PM
newhaul
Re: Downside of living aboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
Apparently the big non-no for boaters are the 1 or 2 pound propane bottles. There's no valve on them, just rubber "ball" that is supposed to block off the gas when nothing is screwed into the bottle. Unfortunately, I've seen those rubber balls just not make a good seal, so the propane can and will normally leak out. Even the "good" ones can go bad in storage that way. Although, some clever soul does sell gasketed brass caps that can be screwed over those, to ensure there us a positive seal.
I use those 1lb disposable tanks and have never had a problem. I store new ones in the lazeret ( vented to sea). My rule fro them is once it is hooked to the regulator of portable equipment it stays on till its empty a valve is much more reliable than the check valve on the tanks
23 Hours Ago 11:03 AM
Tbone
Re: Downside of living aboard

I am not fully moved into my new boat, a Pearson Vanguard, but I'm quite comfortable on it for long periods, and I don't need anything else. My only gripe about living aboard so far is waking up with a hangover when the wind is pounding or there's lots of boat traffic in the little bay where my marina is, and feeling more like crap than if I were on land with a hangover because my boat is getting bounced around at the dock. Other than that, I have no complaints that I can't do anything about.

I have a list of "to do" projects taped to the inside of my coach roof. Like someone said before, new liveaboards tend to start out strong and their will dies off. I take it slow with my projects and have fun in between. My projects involve both comfort of living, safety issues to address, cosmetics, and mechanical work. Basically everything to keep a boat as it should be kept. The safety and rigging projects I have take priority. Without them, I feel much less comfortable sailing the boat. The comfort projects are mostly little things I can do in the evenings before or after dinner, or on a rainy day where I mostly stay inside the cabin.
1 Week Ago 03:46 PM
travlineasy
Re: Downside of living aboard

For me, a 20-pound bottle lasts me about 6 months of cooking. And, those bottles have a valve on top, which I can readily access when I need to turn the stove/oven on or off. That's why I didn't spend another $150 for an LP gas detector that had the solenoid valve in the system. I've had small bottles leak from the rubber valves after removing the regulator, so I just don't trust them, though I use them on my kettle grill. After connecting the valve on the small bottles, I usually just leave it connected and leave the bottle attached to the grill unless the weather is going to be real nasty. If that's the case, I remove the bottle, leave the regulator connected and bungee the bottle to the stern rail, which if it were to leak, the leakage would blow overboard. I must admit, though, I've only had one of those bottles leak in 50 years of using them.

All the best,

Gary
1 Week Ago 03:32 PM
hellosailor
Re: Downside of living aboard

Apparently the big non-no for boaters are the 1 or 2 pound propane bottles. There's no valve on them, just rubber "ball" that is supposed to block off the gas when nothing is screwed into the bottle. Unfortunately, I've seen those rubber balls just not make a good seal, so the propane can and will normally leak out. Even the "good" ones can go bad in storage that way. Although, some clever soul does sell gasketed brass caps that can be screwed over those, to ensure there us a positive seal.
1 Week Ago 03:02 PM
travlineasy
Re: Downside of living aboard

yes, it's marketed as an LP gas detector, which is the primary reason I purchased it. However, when I began reading the associated literature that came with it I discovered it works for many other explosive gasses. Just a bonus I guess.

Now, there are others that have cut-off valves that automatically shut down the propane with a solenoid when explosive gasses are detected, but they are quite expensive in comparison. I always turn off the propane after cooking, just to be on the safe side. In the past 4 years, though, I've never had a propane leak. I've had batteries overcharge, spilled gasoline, but not a single propane problem.

All the best,

Gary
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