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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Engines > Outboard > Legality of 2 strokes.
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Thread: Legality of 2 strokes. Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-06-2014 09:45 PM
ericb760
Re: Legality of 2 strokes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dabnis View Post
IIRC, on every motorcycle, outboard, generator, & snowblower I have had, which amounts to about 25 items, there has been a screw or bolt located at the bottom of the float bowl. Loosen until no more gas flows out after a shake or two. Some drain screws/bolts are right in the open, some are kind of hidden.

Older cars with carburetors, if any are left, should also be drained, same locations as above, if not driven every week or so.

If your motor is in a well, or way out there on a transom bracket, the drain screw may be a bit difficult to get to. So the next best thing is to "run it dry", even though there will be a small amount of fuel left in the bowl. If you back the screw all the way out it is guaranteed it will fall in the water.

I have used this for many years and have had no fuel related problems except for one time I forgot to drain over the winter, which was my fault. No affiliation with Berryman's, other additives may work as well or better. Maybe they aren't even necessary, your mileage may vary.

Fuel Additives / Treatments | Berryman Products

Paul T
Thank you.
05-06-2014 05:18 PM
dabnis
Re: Legality of 2 strokes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ericb760 View Post
Can you explain exactly how you do this, please?
IIRC, on every motorcycle, outboard, generator, & snowblower I have had, which amounts to about 25 items, there has been a screw or bolt located at the bottom of the float bowl. Loosen until no more gas flows out after a shake or two. Some drain screws/bolts are right in the open, some are kind of hidden.

Older cars with carburetors, if any are left, should also be drained, same locations as above, if not driven every week or so.

If your motor is in a well, or way out there on a transom bracket, the drain screw may be a bit difficult to get to. So the next best thing is to "run it dry", even though there will be a small amount of fuel left in the bowl. If you back the screw all the way out it is guaranteed it will fall in the water.

I have used this for many years and have had no fuel related problems except for one time I forgot to drain over the winter, which was my fault. No affiliation with Berryman's, other additives may work as well or better. Maybe they aren't even necessary, your mileage may vary.

Fuel Additives / Treatments | Berryman Products

Paul T
05-06-2014 01:52 PM
ericb760
Re: Legality of 2 strokes.

[QUOTE=dabnis;1803610Since that, I drain the carb each time[/QUOTE]

Can you explain exactly how you do this, please?
05-04-2014 02:06 PM
dabnis
Re: Legality of 2 strokes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by outbound View Post
I do run my 2 strokes in a garbage can twice a year. Even the ones only used in fresh. It's when I tune them and winterized / commission them. If properly tuned the water is much cleaner. The old ones don't like 10% alcohol much. Use race gas then stabize then pinch feed to carb and burn bowl dry for winter. Was having seals go but now they are fine.
If had to choose would go 2 stroke for everything. They will run even on lousy gas. Gas on a boat now has alcohol . It always gets water in it after awhile. Don't store more than 5g because of that.
Use bunny ears on the 9.9hp 4 stroke merc for the ding any chance I get. Got it cheap but hate that engine. All controls in handle and no way to adjust choke.
Some time ago I forgot to drain the gas out of my Honda 2 HP 4 stroke and ended up with a float bowl & jets full of grunge, Thoroughly cleaned the carb & finally got it to run OK, but not spot on, as before, my fault. New carb, about $100 was needed.

Since that, I drain the carb each time, unless I am going to use it again in a few days. Same procedure for my generator & snow blower. Just running them "dry" still leaves some gas in the float bowl. Also use this:

Fuel Additives / Treatments | Berryman Products

No more problems, even with ethanol.

Paul T
05-04-2014 10:50 AM
outbound
Re: Legality of 2 strokes.

I do run my 2 strokes in a garbage can twice a year. Even the ones only used in fresh. It's when I tune them and winterized / commission them. If properly tuned the water is much cleaner. The old ones don't like 10% alcohol much. Use race gas then stabize then pinch feed to carb and burn bowl dry for winter. Was having seals go but now they are fine.
If had to choose would go 2 stroke for everything. They will run even on lousy gas. Gas on a boat now has alcohol . It always gets water in it after awhile. Don't store more than 5g because of that.
Use bunny ears on the 9.9hp 4 stroke merc for the ding any chance I get. Got it cheap but hate that engine. All controls in handle and no way to adjust choke.
05-04-2014 09:18 AM
Maine Sail
Re: Legality of 2 strokes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jzk View Post
That is not the information that I am seeing. I see a very heavy 2 stroke evinrude being offered for sale:

15-HO High Output (H.O.) Engines | Evinrude USA

High Output (H.O.) Performance to the Max Engines | Evinrude USA

Be sure to read the explanation about how there are no oil changes, that the oil is burned in combustion. The 15hp is 181 lbs and more.
Those are their high output series loaded with features and options that weigh them down like power tilt/trim, larger alternator etc... For a two stroke they are still tanks.

was assuming folks were looking at the "portable range", which are four strokes and actually lighter..... In order to make a 2 stroke legal you clearly add a bunch of weight, about 100 pounds if you want the HO series...!! The old Yamaha 2 stroke 15HP weighed in at 80 pounds......

15 HP Portable engines Engines | Evinrude USA
05-03-2014 08:21 PM
dabnis
Re: Legality of 2 strokes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumble View Post
The real advantage to a diesel outboard is that it can use the same fuel source as the mothership. Ignoring everything else, not needing to deal with gas onboard is a huge plus. And being able to burn the ships diesel allows a lot of options otherwise not available like using the outboard as a get home option in case of serious problems.
They are an interesting concept. I noticed in the specs that even the 4 HP has electric/manual start. From 10 HP up I didn't see a manual start option. I can imagine trying to start even the smaller motors manually could be difficult, although we had a 50HP Evinrude V4 that had no electric starter on it, difficult, but possible to start.

Our 6HP 4 stroke Tohatsu takes a pretty heavy & fast pull to start, much harder than our 1970 6HP 2 stroke, two cylinder Johnson, which I gave to my daughter because I could no longer use it on Lake Tahoe.

Paul T
05-03-2014 07:07 PM
Stumble
Re: Legality of 2 strokes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by newhaul View Post
It appears that the fhd10'. The 10HP model is exhausted thru the prop and the literature says it is epa and Iso 9001 certified and at 78 kg its heavier than the four stroke gas. By about 25 kg however it is significantly better on fuel.
The real advantage to a diesel outboard is that it can use the same fuel source as the mothership. Ignoring everything else, not needing to deal with gas onboard is a huge plus. And being able to burn the ships diesel allows a lot of options otherwise not available like using the outboard as a get home option in case of serious problems.
05-03-2014 05:50 PM
newhaul
Re: Legality of 2 strokes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dabnis View Post
Oh m, I wonder if they include ear protection with the motor? With all the grief automotive diesels have to go through, I wonder if the EPA will "allow" them?

Paul T
It appears that the fhd10'. The 10HP model is exhausted thru the prop and the literature says it is epa and Iso 9001 certified and at 78 kg its heavier than the four stroke gas. By about 25 kg however it is significantly better on fuel.
05-03-2014 05:28 PM
MarkSF
Re: Legality of 2 strokes.

If I was going to use an outboard for extended periods, I would go with a 4 stroke. The better fuel economy means carrying a lot less gas. The only circumstances under which I'd go for a 2 stroke would be if I were particularly sensitive to weight - ie lifting it on and off a dinghy.

Try this : run your two stroke in a bucket for a while, then look at the water in it. It's disgusting what they put out. Up to a third of the fuel consumed comes out unburned, plus the oil. I happen to care about that.
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