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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Need ideas on how to raise a sunk boat.
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Thread: Need ideas on how to raise a sunk boat. Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-04-2007 01:36 PM
sailingdog Mooring fees or dock fees... same difference—legally either would be a connection to the boat.
09-04-2007 01:25 PM
SVDistantStar When was it said it was at a dock? Its in the middle of an anchorage. Nothing but moorings and boats all around it.
09-04-2007 01:24 PM
SVDistantStar Eh, i doubt ill ever hear about it. In the same area theres about 10-15 other boats that are sunk. I do have the title on the boat, but i havent transfered it to my name yet.
09-04-2007 01:23 PM
sailingdog As HS has pointed out, if the boat can be traced to you—even if they don't find actual ownership papers—since you've been paying for the slip or dock storage fees for the boat, the authorities might find that enough to hold you responsible for salvage fees.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SVDistantStar View Post
The hull to deck joint was fibreglassed over by one of the boats last owners. The only opening in the boat is the companion way, so i was thinking put some of the tubes in the v-berth where they wouldnt fit through the door.

As for my many boats, ive really only got this one and my Pearson. Ive given away and given up on the others that i had or was trying to get. The Kittiwake 23 got smashed to bits by a larger boat.

I cant really leave the boat where it is since its right next to a mooring. I guess if it comes down to it, i can abandon it where it is and cut the rig down. I dont really have any money into it yet other than almost a year of keeping up with it.

Oh yea, forgot about the O'Day 27 we just pulled out the marsh.
09-04-2007 01:10 PM
hellosailor "I cant really leave the boat where it is since its right next to a mooring."
Are there any ownership papers with your name on them? If so, and you abandon the boat, you could get a phone call one day, or a bill for the salvage and removal of it from navigable waters. An expensive surprise.
09-04-2007 12:58 PM
retclt Don’t cut! Have your diver buddies disassemble the rigging and any other parts and put them on the net for sale. Masts are hard to come by these days – at a reasonable price anyway. I could have used one that size for an old ocean racer I had awhile back.
09-04-2007 12:38 PM
SVDistantStar The hull to deck joint was fibreglassed over by one of the boats last owners. The only opening in the boat is the companion way, so i was thinking put some of the tubes in the v-berth where they wouldnt fit through the door.

As for my many boats, ive really only got this one and my Pearson. Ive given away and given up on the others that i had or was trying to get. The Kittiwake 23 got smashed to bits by a larger boat.

I cant really leave the boat where it is since its right next to a mooring. I guess if it comes down to it, i can abandon it where it is and cut the rig down. I dont really have any money into it yet other than almost a year of keeping up with it.

Oh yea, forgot about the O'Day 27 we just pulled out the marsh.
09-04-2007 10:42 AM
retclt The van we moved was 21 feet deep on the sand putting the top at about 14 feet. We filled our inner tubes using 200 feet of hose run to a compressor on shore. Even though we floated the roof of the van to the surface none of the tubes popped, probably because the tubes themselves only rose about 14 feet and we hadn’t fill them completely to begin with. We had to use rope tying the tubes together so they didn't escape through the front window and back where the doors were no longer there. I would think a boat might be easier since you only have the companionway opening to deal with. I have 32 years of diving experience in all types of situations. Black water, caves, wrecks, etc. but even still, if it were me I’d hire it out. Even if the boat isn’t worth a large amount you’re stuck at this point. It is easy to get hurt or dead on something that appears to be so simple.

Our little prank took all day to pull off. It would have been much easier if the previous owner had left the keys in it.
09-04-2007 10:31 AM
morganmike
Quote:
Originally Posted by deniseO30 View Post
to figure out how much floatation (for example)a barrel would have.. is it something like the gallons it holds? The weight of a gal of water is about 9 lbs. so a 30 gal barrel would displace 30 gals of water X 9? = 270 lbs? I'm sure I'm wrong but it seems logical enough. ...
That's pretty much exactly it, you're not wrong at all. The bouyancy of a given volume is exactly equal to the volume of water it displaces. The volume measurement can be taken in any convenient unit of measure, be it gallons, liters, cubic feet, or steres (cubic meters). It all depends on what's convenient. If you had a 55 gallon drum, and assumed 8.5 pounds per gallon (actually it's closer to 8.3, but 8.5 makes the math easier) then you'd be pretty much right on the money at 467.5 pounds of displacement. That is, an empty 55 gallon drum will displace about 460 pounds less the weight of the drum itself and even the polyethylene drums weigh 10 pounds or so. It would be safe to assume you get approximately 450 pounds of displacement per drum. So, theoretically, to lift a 3500 pound boat you'd need 8 drums. Of course, as previous posters indicate, finding attachments and restraints for 3500 pounds of displacement isn't always easy.
09-04-2007 09:34 AM
KismetP362 My boat was under water the first time I saw it.

I was a part of the salvage team and this is what we tried. (note I said "tried")

Attempt #1: Cheap float bags (water beds)
stuff the bags in the cabin, fill. The result was the bags provide so much lift that they found their way to the companion way hatch and blew out the lip that holds the slide in place.

Attempt #2: Tie plastic drums and fill (55 Gal)
The drums didn't want to stay down and there is no tie point on the round drum.

Attempt #3: leave lid off drum, poke hole in lip.
Worked much better, no lid means that swimming it down there was no issue, a bowline through the hole in the lip of the barrel to a strong point on the boat. Repeat for each stanchion, cleat and chainplate. Fill a little air from the scuba tank to keep it upright. Then someone passes down the compressor hose and you start filing. This still didn't break the suction.

Resolution: At low tide, Tie many lines from the docks around the boat down to the strongest points on the hull. (A sling under would be great but the whole keel was sunk in the muck). Let the tide come up. Here is the key point>>> at high tide, tie the boat to the pilings and let the tide drop. Now the barrels can help out and your good to go. Pump out the cabin really quick and up she floats.

Now this is assuming that you are a: near docks. and b: in Maine where we have 12' tides.

See my site for some of the salvage pics if you want.
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