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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Crew Wanted/Available > Computers on Ships
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Thread: Computers on Ships Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-03-2012 08:10 PM
Classic30
Re: Computers on Ships

Quote:
Originally Posted by steel View Post
It still should be better than trying to outsource software work to India!
Not necessarily..

1. Their internet connection speed and up-time will be far better than yours on land (never mind at sea)
2. Their hourly rates are about half whatever you might ask for, and
3. If the client needs someone to attend an urgent meeting, they're a plane-flight away - not 1000 miles from the nearest land..

If you're into IT and wanting a job at sea, a cruise ship is the best place to be - their IT needs are enormous. Walking to work is good to!
05-03-2012 03:45 PM
steel
Re: Computers on Ships

It still should be better than trying to outsource software work to India!
05-01-2012 05:01 PM
hellosailor
Re: Computers on Ships

Steel, anything is possible IF your employer is willing to accept telecommuting and "at sea" doesn't happen during assignments. Because truly at sea, you'll be using satellite data connections and you can still figure a buck a minute or more which is still really damned cheap considering what was possible ten years ago.

One might ask, if a competent "software engineer" shouldn't be able to figure out the possibilities and costs for internet connections. Unless you're really something special, most employers want solid connectivity while contractors/employees are on any kind of assignment.
05-01-2012 04:45 PM
steel
Re: Computers on Ships

I've been wondering if it would be possible to be a software engineer at sea. You could communicate by live chat & email, and then upload your work back home each day. It shouldn't require much bandwidth.
05-01-2012 01:53 PM
SHNOOL
Re: Computers on Ships

Given that this is a 2007 thread, he's probably since joined the Navy, and done the 4 years and moved on.
09-21-2007 08:20 AM
huguley3 Regarding cruise ships and the conditions. That is kinda what I figured they would be like. It just seems like to much of a dream job that their would have to be a big downside since people would want to do it. If people want to do it then corporate will find a way to exploit it. The cramped quarters and lack of privacy would not be a big issue. If I can plan to join the Navy then a cruise ship can't be worse than that. Except for maybe the potential for beatings in international waters, the Navy probably does not do that.

The general reason I am looking into this is that I am kinda burned out on IT related things. A break or a different angle on IT(maybe radar,radio satellite comms etc) will help to reenergize me. I agree about the money to be made in IT its pretty hard to beat. It used to be that I loved my job so it was a win-win but atm I would rather get less money and do something I liked.

Thanks for the pointers and advice everyone. I will post back here with anything interesting I find for others who may have the same questions.
09-20-2007 09:01 PM
LakeTravisP26 Consider going into the consulting side of IT. I officially live on a sail boat in Texas (no state income tax) and work all over the country. Currently in the SF bay area and sailing out of Sausalito this weekend. Two weeks ago I was camping in the Rio Chama Wilderness in NM hiking the continental divide trail.
09-20-2007 08:34 PM
Classic30
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
On commercial ships, I doubt there's any full-time IT position since they really try to go almost crewless in order to keep costs to the bone. On cruise lines--you are looking at something arguably worse: A combination of the 'hospitality industry' and shipping, each of which generally believes that pond scum can be whipped into working harder and for less money, and easily replaced if they object. A lot like corporate IT in many ways--but you don't get to go home at night, you get a bunk bed in a shared cabin, indoors, below decks, with instructions not to fraternize with the paying passengers.
It depends what you're willing to put up with, I suppose... Some people don't mind shared quarters in steerage if it means an interesting and varied job.

IT positions on cruise liners and mega-yachts certainly do exist and will become more so as ships get bigger (thinking "The World" and things like that).

One thing is for sure - your typical "IT" role might be only 5% of the job, so if that is all you're good at, forget it.

--Cameron
09-20-2007 07:56 PM
hellosailor On commercial ships, I doubt there's any full-time IT position since they really try to go almost crewless in order to keep costs to the bone. On cruise lines--you are looking at something arguably worse: A combination of the 'hospitality industry' and shipping, each of which generally believes that pond scum can be whipped into working harder and for less money, and easily replaced if they object. A lot like corporate IT in many ways--but you don't get to go home at night, you get a bunk bed in a shared cabin, indoors, below decks, with instructions not to fraternize with the paying passengers.

I think you'd do better to try finding a job in corporate IT in one of the fields that pays well (security, etc.) or possibly in casino security operations (and then moving to a shipboard casino, since security has some limits to hours and some extra pay) in a shop that is big enough to have shifts, so you get time off--when you can take some of that hard-earned pay and go sailing on your own with it.

A lot of corporate IT shops want 20 year olds with 20 years of experience, willing and outright eager to work 80 hour weeks at 40 hour pay. Those are the shops that will promise you lots of excitment and growth--and burn you out fast. Interview them, and screen them, agressively to avoid getting stuck in one.
09-20-2007 07:39 PM
Classic30 If you want to get into Maritime IT, I'd suggest downloading copies of the installation regulations/standards and becoming familiar with the equipment used on the majority of the world's shipping. The main regulatory bodies involved are:

- Lloyd's Register (LR)
- Bureau Veritas (BV)
- Det Norske Veritas (DNV)
- American Bureau of Shipping (ABS)
- Registro Italiano Navale (RINA)

Although there are a host of others, these are the main ones. Do a web search for the standards of each of these and get familiar with them.

Remember that Maritime IT is not restricted to just a few office computers and servers (although there will certainly be that) - you must come up to speed with digital radar, GPS, radio and satellite comms and protocols especially AIS and GMDSS.

If you have experience with amateur radio, that would help. Search the web sites of the main navigation equipment suppliers like Thales, Raytheon, etc.. and good luck.

--Cameron
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