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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Cruising On A Cal 20
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Thread: Cruising On A Cal 20 Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-02-2013 01:46 PM
campuscab
Re: Cruising On A Cal 20

I am going to take mine next year from Miami to the Bahamas. I figure after a year of sailing on the great lakes i should be able to handle it no problem. You should not have to be rich to enjoy sailing. I could have bought a bigger boat and I am sure I will. The boat can handle the trip. The reason is the adventure, and accomplishment. It us just being different. So I,think training and outfitting are the key. I have done many dangerous things in my life safely. The trick is being prepared for the worst and plan for the best.
10-10-2007 01:19 PM
cockeyedbob Willy

Bet your one of those folks who drive 'round town.

Ya give no thought to jousting with another, closing at 80+ mph, passing with 6' clearance, trusting they ain't drunk, yackin' on the phone, figurin' the GPS, slappin' the kids, lightin' the fag, changin' the station, eatin', spillin' the coffee, or fiddlin' wit da willie ... just to get somewhere ya probably didn't need to go in the first place. That's nuts!

Go ... have a bail-out plan and look at the bright side. It's less expensive to cut up and haul a 20 footer off the beach than a 40 footer. If yer dead, just think of all the taxes you're gonna get outta payin', and, best of all, no Hillary forever!
10-03-2007 03:03 PM
willykunkle Mr. Gainer you've hit the nail directly on the head. GO SMALL, GO YOUNG, GO NOW. I don't have much money, but I have lot of drive and ambition. I don't need a lot of food or sleep, I just need to go.

My trip will be very well researched and planned, this is why I've given myself almost a year to do so (which is a very long time for someone my age!).

Some of you may think I'm foolish, but how else will I learn, except by just doing it?

Thanks to everybody on here for all the encouragement, as well as the challenging replies!
10-03-2007 03:43 AM
arbarnhart
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailaway21 View Post
As usual Mr. Ganier brings up an excellent point. Captain Bligh sailed his longboat because it was the only boat he had. I suspect Robert crossed the Atlantic in his boat for much the same reason. There are countless threads here devoted to the ideal cruising boat, if not the ideal deep sea boat. I suspect that many young people do not feel that they have the time, money, and certainly not the patience to acquire that lightly used Swan and end up saying, "screw it, this is what I got, I'm going".
That is pretty much the story with the guy I contacted who crossed over to the Bahamas in a boat just like mine. He didn't even have it exactly; someone loaned it to him. It was available and he didn't run into anything he could not handle. That doesn't make it a wise choice; another boat would have given him a wider margin of safety with respect to what he could handle. But he didn't purchase a boat, so his choice was yes or no. Our young friend who started this thread has more choices.
10-03-2007 02:37 AM
RickLaPaz Very nice, Mr. Gainer. You took the 612 words right out of my mouth............
10-03-2007 02:17 AM
Tartan34C
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailaway21 View Post
Captain Bligh sailed his longboat because it was the only boat he had. I suspect Robert crossed the Atlantic in his boat for much the same reason. There are countless threads here devoted to the ideal cruising boat, if not the ideal deep sea boat. I suspect that many young people do not feel that they have the time, money, and certainly not the patience to acquire that lightly used Swan and end up saying, "screw it, this is what I got, I'm going".
As a teenager I did a lot of sailing in a 22 foot Sea Sprite daysailor. When I was getting ready to do my first trans-Atlantic in 1974 I arranged sponsorship and had a Sea Sprite weekender built for the trip. That trip and the deals that made it possible started to come together in 1971 when I was only 18. She was not quite a stock boat but close to it. I had decided that sailing was what I wanted to do and turning my trips into sponsored events was the way I paid for everything. It was clear to me that if I did the conventional thing and worked first and then sailed after retirement I would be, as I am today old and tired when I started doing long distance sailing so I wanted to sail first and then retire from the world of professional sailing into a sailing related job and settle down. I never quite got the settle down part right but I did get into the boat design/build/repair business.

I donít understand where most people get the impression that small boat sailing is tough or dangerous. At one time long distance cruising in decked sailing canoes was normal and trips of over a thousand miles were not uncommon. The British still have a yearly trip from England to Iceland by kayak. There is a class of 17 foot boats that used to race trans Atlantic on a regular basis and of course a lot of small boats are out there doing long trips without any fanfare at all and most of you just donít hear of them. Sometimes I think the most vocal opponents of small boat voyaging are the people with the least experience with or knowledge about the subject. I have cruised in boats as small as 13 feet and most of my long trips were done on boats without engines or electrical systems. In fact my first crossing was on a boat that was a real sailboat and she didnít have an engine. And letís not get started on the subject of GPS instead of sextant. Today you donít need to know a third of what you needed to know before modern gear and GPS became popular. Long distance sailing has become safer and simpler then ever before. And in a strange twist I think that may spell the end of long distance sailing was we know it today. As more people try it without proper preparations and using larger boats that they canít handle in an emergency the governments have taken notice and started to think about regulation because of the increase in accidents and problems that go with inexperience and ignorance offshore.

Is a Cal 20 suitable for the trip this gentleman is considering? If you have decided to base your plans on a light displacement boat the Cal 20 is an excellent choice for offshore work. She can be made ready with a minimum amount of work and I think if you do your homework and prepare properly you will have a great time. Not my style in boats but still a great choice. Each boat is different and requires a plan written for the trip/boat combination. I like to sail in CCA style boats but have enough experience in light boats to understand the attraction they have for some people. A light boat requires a different mindset for stores and storm tactics and definitely will not be able to sail on the same routes that a heaver boat could sail. But there are no problems about the Cal 20 and the trip this man is considering that good planning couldnít overcome.

After everything is said and done as far as the boat goes the biggest question becomes one about the person himself. Some people donít ever get comfortable in a small boat and some find that being alone and out of sight of land is not as much fun as they expected. Small boat sailing isnít for everyone and thatís fine. Build up to it and make sure you really want to do it before committing to a long trip you might not enjoy. But as someone else said, go small go now, and I think he was right because you are young and capable only once and having money and larger boats comes with age. And age dulls the sense of adventure and kills the spirit. I have never regretted for a moment the sailing I did as a kid but would not do any of it today. I sail a Tartan 34C now and want a dry warm bunk these days.
Good luck and all the best,
Robert Gainer
10-03-2007 12:50 AM
RickLaPaz
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailaway21 View Post
Please don't tell me it's a copy of, "Grilling with the Cruising Dad".
Haven't heard of that one, but if you like to cook, try this oldie but goody. My fave for cruising--and at home......

And no, I'm not gonna send you a copy on my peso.


http://cgi.ebay.com/TERENCE-JANERICC...QQcmdZViewItem
10-03-2007 12:35 AM
sailaway21 Please don't tell me it's a copy of, "Grilling with the Cruising Dad".
10-03-2007 12:24 AM
RickLaPaz
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailaway21 View Post
Extra credit?
I actually call them "go-aheads" and the reason is that you can't back up in flip-flops, you can only walk forward or go ahead.
Nicely done, Sir.

"Tell us what our contestant has won, Johnny"............
10-03-2007 12:20 AM
sailaway21 Extra credit?
I actually call them "go-aheads" and the reason is that you can't back up in flip-flops, you can only walk forward or go ahead.
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