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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Music Etiquette at the Dock
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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-29-2014 03:23 PM
RichH
Re: Music Etiquette at the Dock

My wife plays fiddle, I play 5-string banjo. When we arrive at an anchorage or a new marina nobody minds at all .... until we get out the gas powered air-horn bagpipe and the kettle drum.
07-29-2014 02:18 PM
jzk
Re: Music Etiquette at the Dock

So we sailed from South Haven, Mi to Chicago on Sunday. When we returned to the dock, all of the drunk powerboaters were returning from the playpen. For a while, this one powerboat was blasting Jimmy Buffet so loud that I could enjoy it maybe 5 slips down. Then another sea ray type came in across from him and was jamming their club music. Both boats have amplifiers well in excess of what might be stock on a powerboat. They seemed to get into a battle to see who could blast their music the loudest.

For them, "boating" is driving over to the playpen with a boat full of partiers, drinks, and whatever other substances they enjoy. They usually have the relaxation station inflated. They anchor at the playpen all day and drink, party, and play music as loud as physically possible.

I found it somewhat annoying, but no big deal. That is just how our dock is on a Sunday late afternoon.
07-29-2014 02:14 PM
caberg
Re: Music Etiquette at the Dock

Quote:
Originally Posted by smurphny View Post
If one acoustic guitar and vocal bothers people, well, they probably ought to get the cork out of that place the sun don't shine. I have had to put ear buds in on occasion when nearby boats or shore venues start playing totally obnoxious rap type "music," GAWD.
Can you really not see that for some people, listening to a guy play Pete Seeger songs on his guitar is just as painful for them, as the "rap type 'music'" is for you? Sounds pretty arrogant to assume that everyone loves you and your guitar.
07-29-2014 11:59 AM
Minnesail
Re: Music Etiquette at the Dock

Quote:
Originally Posted by bblument View Post
I like to cruise into quiet anchorages or marinas while blasting Wagner's "Ride of the Valkyries."
That'd be a sight!

It is surprising how well sound can carry over water. I remember once coming into an anchorage in the late afternoon. As the skipper motored around scouting for an anchoring location I was playing music quietly, it didn't interfere with conversation and didn't bother the skipper's concentration.

That evening we were hiking on shore and got called over by some people having a bonfire. They said "We heard you playing the Beastie Boys when you anchored and figured you guys would be up for a party tonight, we gathered extra firewood and brought beer ashore!" So we hung out with them all night and had a great fire.

(Sorry, yes it was rap.)
07-28-2014 08:41 PM
outbound
Re: Music Etiquette at the Dock

Some of us are on the boat without putting feet on the ground for days and weeks. Music is a neccessity for some to maintain the golden path. When batteries allow and situation permits with out untoward intrusion on others yes we play music. In my view this is demonstration of a cultured gentleman or lady. I can see how playing music on the sound system inside the boat where it is not audible to others or in cockpit speakers on,passage or in an empty anchorage is any but a inducement to feel the finer aspects of true harmonious living.
07-28-2014 08:37 PM
hellosailor
Re: Music Etiquette at the Dock

mhgirl, this is the reason that you can no longer find simple old fashioned ice picks for sale at the local hardware store, or WalMart. They've been banned from the civilian market, OK, not banned but it is really hard to get a license and carry permit for them.

You'll find the judicious application of an ice pick through the holes in the center of a speaker grill has been known to passivate the world's finest elevator music. A marine model is not necessary for marine use, as they are all designed for use with (frozen) water anyhow.

A stun gun usually will accomplish the same thing, high voltage model, about five seconds in the middle of the speaker grill. But that's noisy, it ain't got no class.
07-28-2014 08:32 PM
Multihullgirl
Re: Music Etiquette at the Dock

Shnool,

Those aren't just at lakes. The GOM is riddled with that ****. There's a sound installer here which specializes in high-powered marine installations. It's worse than the kids in cars, Fosgates etc. I figure that one day I'm gonna have enough and 'going postal' ain't gonna be in it.
07-28-2014 08:19 PM
AlaskaMC
Re: Music Etiquette at the Dock

Quote:
Originally Posted by SHNOOL View Post
You folks have obviously not met the owners of these kinds of boats... our WHOLE lake gets to listen, because they usually run about 200+ watts, because you know the wake boarder has to be able to hear it (over the 5000+ hp motor)...
Yep, that was what I was thinking. We have these ALL OVER THE LAKE, all playing at the same time, all different music styles. It is so loud it is amazing. And I am an ex opera guy and rock music person and highly appreciates all types of music at all volumes and it still is totally irritating.

Funny, no one notices my small bluetooth speaker playing Bob Marly at light volume. I was once told to turn it up.

Interesting how environment and perspective can make the answer to the OP so different.


EDIT: Just so no one misunderstands, you should do what is appropriate for the environment. Mostly this means no loud (audible outside your boat) music on the hook or marina. But, if the environment is a "party" one already, your politeness may not be noticed over the noise.
07-28-2014 06:33 PM
CaptainChaos
Re: Music Etiquette at the Dock

Quote:
Originally Posted by skygazer View Post
I would like to emphasize the distinction between actually playing music on an actual acoustic instrument and the misnamed "playing" music as in "playing" the radio.

Flipping a switch on a sound machine and then partially ignoring it should not be compared to a human playing music on an acoustic instrument, which requires fairly total concentration and effort. I'm not including amplified instruments or electric instruments, which require less effort and produce more volume.

Concentration and effort are difficult to maintain, so an insrument player is not going to go on forever like a machine. Having a living breathing human behind the music makes it more interesting to listen to, they are expressing human feelings through the music (I hope). Even if just practicing I find it pleasant to listen to.

While I detest boats that come into a quiet anchorage or dock and blast the radio/stereo I found that I enjoyed listening to a guy who sat on his foredeck, leaned against his cabin, and played his acoustic guitar. He didn't need to be professional, it was just real and pleasant to listen to. I knew it couldn't last, and was a bit sorry when it ended.

On the subject of bagpipes, I've always enjoyed them. Where I lived in Nova Scotia the local radio always played the "morning march", a single selection of their bagpipe recordings that played at 6:55 AM. I loved rolling down the hills to my job with the morning march "playing" on my car radio. It ended just as I arrived at work. I've often been moved by the solitary bagpipe player at funerals or at sunset. The pipes I'm familiar with were used in war long ago, I can see the men being fearsome with their tall hats and music that didn't falter as they climbed over obstacles. So the sound evokes feelings of life and death and thoughts of eternity and those who have gone before and will come after.

Rap..... mmm, no so much.

I personally only play my guitar inside my cabin. I have no dedicated speakers on my boats, I've purchased boats that had them and removed or ignored them. Of course, tiny built in speakers on the marine and weather radio. I think it can be a loss for people to try to "get away from it all" and then bring it all with them, and inflict it on those who may appreciate the peace and nature sounds of the outdoors. If I do want to listen to something I use headphones, then I don't bother anyone, not even my wife onboard with me. And it saves power for the all important freezer - think cold drinks - which by the way I power with a cheap solar panel along with lights etc. No generator.

I guess we must be extremists, because the times my wife and I wanted to listen to something at the same time she used her earbuds, one for me and one for her.

By the way I didn't care for the idea that I could easily move if someone noisy anchors near me. Since I anchored under sail and the wind may have let up, and the sails are furled and covered, it is not so easy to move.
There is a lot of truth in your comments though I may be more extreme as I opted to not have the freezer...
07-28-2014 03:25 PM
skygazer
Re: Music Etiquette at the Dock

I would like to emphasize the distinction between actually playing music on an actual acoustic instrument and the misnamed "playing" music as in "playing" the radio.

Flipping a switch on a sound machine and then partially ignoring it should not be compared to a human playing music on an acoustic instrument, which requires fairly total concentration and effort. I'm not including amplified instruments or electric instruments, which require less effort and produce more volume.

Concentration and effort are difficult to maintain, so an insrument player is not going to go on forever like a machine. Having a living breathing human behind the music makes it more interesting to listen to, they are expressing human feelings through the music (I hope). Even if just practicing I find it pleasant to listen to.

While I detest boats that come into a quiet anchorage or dock and blast the radio/stereo I found that I enjoyed listening to a guy who sat on his foredeck, leaned against his cabin, and played his acoustic guitar. He didn't need to be professional, it was just real and pleasant to listen to. I knew it couldn't last, and was a bit sorry when it ended.

On the subject of bagpipes, I've always enjoyed them. Where I lived in Nova Scotia the local radio always played the "morning march", a single selection of their bagpipe recordings that played at 6:55 AM. I loved rolling down the hills to my job with the morning march "playing" on my car radio. It ended just as I arrived at work. I've often been moved by the solitary bagpipe player at funerals or at sunset. The pipes I'm familiar with were used in war long ago, I can see the men being fearsome with their tall hats and music that didn't falter as they climbed over obstacles. So the sound evokes feelings of life and death and thoughts of eternity and those who have gone before and will come after.

Rap..... mmm, no so much.

I personally only play my guitar inside my cabin. I have no dedicated speakers on my boats, I've purchased boats that had them and removed or ignored them. Of course, tiny built in speakers on the marine and weather radio. I think it can be a loss for people to try to "get away from it all" and then bring it all with them, and inflict it on those who may appreciate the peace and nature sounds of the outdoors. If I do want to listen to something I use headphones, then I don't bother anyone, not even my wife onboard with me. And it saves power for the all important freezer - think cold drinks - which by the way I power with a cheap solar panel along with lights etc. No generator.

I guess we must be extremists, because the times my wife and I wanted to listen to something at the same time she used her earbuds, one for me and one for her.

By the way I didn't care for the idea that I could easily move if someone noisy anchors near me. Since I anchored under sail and the wind may have let up, and the sails are furled and covered, it is not so easy to move.
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