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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Diesel heater chimney exits
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Thread: Diesel heater chimney exits Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-17-2007 03:07 PM
Valiente
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueBlue View Post
Got a great package price from Ocean Options. Included a new digital thermostat, wiring harness's, pump and all necessary misc. duct fittings/extentions, along with a furnace unit they had installed in a local sailboat, but had to remove shortly after.

The boat owner decided to go with hydronic instead of forced air - didn't like air blowing on her feet. I did all the installations - retrofitting my existing ducts and 6 output registers.
I'll pursue this, TB...I was aware of this, as well as the Webasto units. I suppose I'd then have single cooling options (the Marine Air on shore power), and dual heating options (Marine Air at dock and Espar diesel heat on the hook).

I wonder how simple it would be to tap into the existing vents and registers (which look well done) and what size exhaust stack I would require?

I'll ask around. Thanks!
10-17-2007 02:54 PM
TrueBlue Got a great package price from Ocean Options. Included a new digital thermostat, wiring harness's, pump and all necessary misc. duct fittings/extentions, along with a furnace unit they had installed in a local sailboat, but had to remove shortly after.

The boat owner decided to go with hydronic instead of forced air - didn't like air blowing on her feet. I did all the installations - retrofitting my existing ducts and 6 output registers.
10-17-2007 02:47 PM
Valiente Heh...I know the local vendor. It's possible this might may sense due to the fact that all the vents are already in place and there's room for the unit...right beside the Marine Air A/C!

Maybe I'm going about this the wrong way! To hell with a Dickenson!
10-17-2007 02:27 PM
TrueBlue Bite the bullet Val and install an Espar. The new 4D Airtronic I installed to replace the antiquated 3Dl only draws .3 to 2.5 amps at full peak - required for the electronics, fan and meter pump. Plus it sips diesel.



Ocean Options was my supplier.
10-17-2007 02:16 PM
Valiente I have a 12,000 BTU Mermaid Marine Air A/C-heat pump system that is very nice indeed, but which needs a hell of an amperage kick to start and won't work when the water is less than 40 F. There may be a way to run in when on the hook, but I'm not there in my thinking yet.

The idea is to create a single warm "room" in which a bulkhead diesel heater will run. It might be possible to use the existing vents to send warm air to other parts of the boat this way, but that's not the prime rationale, which is simply to take the edge off the cold in marginal conditions. Even this week, with haulout approaching, the unheated boat is still 15-17 C, which is light sweater or fleece temperature.

The saloon and the aft cabin are capable of having water-tight doors installed (yes, I would have proper venting to avoid poisoning or suffocating ourselves). This would make the saloon a smaller space to heat, and there is enough room to sleep in there.

There is a great deal of closed cell foam and sprayed insulation to the waterline. If it weren't for the greenhouse-like pilothouse, which is frequently 12 C hotter in summer than the saloon or the aft cabin, the boat is warmer and drier naturally aspirated, so to speak, than a lot of F/G boats of my acquaintance, which tend to condense expelled breath. I've been "rained on" in my bunk in spring and fall aboard space-heater equipped F/G boats...it's unpleasant.

A lesser-acknowledged benefit of a bulkhead heater is the ability to exchange the air several times a day and to dry out the boat thereby. Even when it is not strictly necessary to heat the boat, sometimes it would make sense to have the diesel heater on low to help retard mildew and condensation.
10-16-2007 10:44 AM
JohnRPollard I was also going to mention that you might consider mounting the stove down below in the main cabin, rather than in the pilothouse. Not knowing how your interior is configured, I generally would think it will be more difficult to force the warmth down into the cabin than to let it spill up into the pilothouse.

Or maybe two units?
10-16-2007 09:14 AM
Valiente That might show up today as I am a subscriber. Yes, I realize propane is simpler, but not in the more distant locales. Diesel is everywhere...you can beg it off a fishing boat if you have to...not that I expect to with 140 gallons aboard.
10-15-2007 06:24 PM
JohnRPollard
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valiente View Post
Commencing bullet-biting. I wanted to solicit opinions, and I have them. I'll pick a model of diesel heater, get out the measuring stick and do some drawings to figure out the best spot for my deck chimney.

Thanks, all.
Cutting the hole through the coachroof IS traumatic. I had to get up the nerve last winter before I could put the 3" hole saw to the deck which, when all was done, I discovered was over 1" thick.

Coincidentally, in the mail arrived today a complimentary copy of Ocean Navigator which contains an article on "Diesel Cabin Heaters". It's not especially detailed, more of a general pros/cons discussion, but it did provide specifics about the amount of fuel consumption and maintenance required. I was surprised at how much maintenance the diesel space heaters require compared to the propane units. Aside from that and the nuisance of preheating they seem like a good choice for the initial reasons you stated.
10-14-2007 11:42 PM
Valiente Commencing bullet-biting. I wanted to solicit opinions, and I have them. I'll pick a model of diesel heater, get out the measuring stick and do some drawings to figure out the best spot for my deck chimney.

Thanks, all.
10-14-2007 12:32 PM
JohnRPollard Valiente,

I have to say I'm not thrilled with your idea to vent the chimney through a portlight. I don't know how your boat is configured, but on ours doing that would encroach on the sidedeck and risk a serious burn for someone going forward. The chimney caps/charlie nobles get quite hot when the heater is in operation. Also, if you plan to use the heater while underway, it could end up taking water if it's on the leeward side in a stiff breeze.

I wish I had True Blue's Espar heat system, but I'm not sure the exhaust fitting is applicable to the chimney for a convection diesel heater. In a lot of respects the installation for the Espar is more like your engine exhaust system, absent the watercooling. Your proposed diesel heater is more like the installtion that Cameraderie describes, i.e. the exhaust exits via convection. There are minimum chimney height requirements to achieve the required "draft", and maximum permissible deflection angles. No 90 degree turns. Typically not more than 30 degrees off the vertical in order to maintain the proper draft when heeled.

I would download the PDF installation instructions for your proposed heater, then just bite the bullet and run the chimney through the coachroof/cabintop as it most likely recommends.

We installed the same Dickinson Newport propane stove as Faster, no worries about moisture with the double-walled chimney. Also, the view of the flame offers a nice ambiance.
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