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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Origo stoves
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-03-2009 07:57 PM
Fitz87 I noticed a funny smell when pumping up my alcohol stove the other day and found a steady stream of alcohol coming from the bottom of one of the burners.

It sounds like the non-pressurized system is safer and better. I think I will order one of these Origo stoves and trash my old Princess model! Thanks for all the info.
11-23-2008 06:32 PM
scottyt i love my 2 burner stove, non pressurized. but i do have a cheap propane bottle feed stove that sits ontop of the alky stove, it has no bottom and almost locks in place for back up.
11-23-2008 02:35 PM
johnshasteen We have the Origo combo no-pressure alcohol and 110v electric. Works great - at home cooking in the slip and decent cooking offshore. We also have a SeaSwing propane unit tht we use in the worst of all conditions.
11-23-2008 02:26 PM
mccary
Safer Yes, Totaly Safe NO

I have an old Origio 3000 on my boat and while I agree that alcohol is safer that propane/butane/etc it is still a stove and as the old saying goes, "Where there is smoke there is fire" Any stove can be a potential danger spot. THE advantage to alcohol is that it can be extinguished with water AND it evaporates! So, when the flame get a bit out of control you can douse with a bucket of water and it's gone... and if the fuel is spilled it flows into the bilge and will eventually evaporate. Propane, etc, is also heavier than air and also goes into the bilge and stays there until it is burned off (BOOM!).

Also, lets not forget the potential for burns (both direct fro flame and also from boiling liquids) with any stove.
11-23-2008 02:06 PM
jpn01
Origo stove and heater

I have had the two burner non-press Origo stove and think it is great. Maybe not quite as hot as propane but easier, safe, compact and light. Buy an extra fuel cannister and fill it when convenient. Put a cap on the spare cannister and it's at the ready if you need i. I would not expect it to store full for long periods but to make sure your stove stays hot while preping dinner, it's a great insurance policy. BTW the Heat Pal by Origo uses the same canister and is the perfect heat accessory for boats. It's portable, safe(within reason) and puts out a lot of warmth. Great suggestion, use high quality alcohol fuel only.
11-22-2008 03:09 PM
t6im
New model Origo 4100 FIRE

Beware the slide controls and components are made of a VERY flamable plastic. Almost ruined my week at Catalina when they caught fire. My wife was making hash brown patatoes for breakfast on a griddle. The griddle apparently held in to much heat. She called me in the cabin and said the "knobs are melting". Just as I looked in fire erupted. She had already removed the patatoes so I calmly grabbed the pot holders and carried the griddle outside and thru it in the Pacific Ocean. Then I went inside grabbing the extinguisher on the way, pointing it into the hole where the slide control used to be I gave it one short blast.
THIS COULD HAVE ENDED IN DISASTER!!!!!!
We have used that same griddle many times before with no problem.
I called Swego (941-355-0248) and ordered replacement slide controls, part#388027-81 SLIDE CONTROL KIT. There is one slide control per kit.
They must know of the problem because the replacement parts are metal. TIM, Bayliner 2452
05-28-2007 09:33 PM
TrueBlue When our good friends had a very nasty boat fire during the Newport Folk Festival a couple years ago, we were very glad to have propane fuled appliances onboard our boat.

His Pearson 33's alcohol stove, inadvertantly leaked fuel into the bilge as he tried priming the cup on his pressurized Kenyon unit. Once ignited the cabin was ablaze, resulting in 10 music lovers jumping overboard . . . a near total disaster.

Fortunately, the captain was sober enough to extinguish the flames before his vessel sunk.
05-28-2007 09:33 PM
sailingdog Baking soda works quite well and is a bit less corrosive than salt. Absorbs nasty odors too.
05-28-2007 09:27 PM
dmchose
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
There have been reported cases of burning alcohol "floating" on top of water used to put out the fire, and starting a fire elsewhere in the boatódry chem extinguishers are probably best.
We always carried a pour spout type of container, of salt for that. Many times, perhaps too many, I remember a leaking stove creating the " invisable flame" and having to use salt on the stove area at sea.Maybe that is why dad always was busy at the helm Anywho, I learned that hair grows back quick, salt is cheap, and finally how to rebuild a alcohol at 14.
Don Mc
05-28-2007 08:55 PM
sailingdog Alcohol is probably the most expensive fuel, per btu. Also, be careful with alcohol stoves, as if you try to refill the cans while they're still hot, you can get a nasty, almost invisible fire for your troubles.

Finally, alcohol fires can be somewhat problematic and difficult to extinguish. There have been reported cases of burning alcohol "floating" on top of water used to put out the fire, and starting a fire elsewhere in the boat—dry chem extinguishers are probably best.
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