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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > diesel winterization questions
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-09-2008 09:57 PM
Sometimesbrilliant
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimsCAL View Post
The annual winterization for my raw water cooled Universal for the last 18 years has been:
1. Run engine on fresh water until warm.
2. Drain fresh water and fill with antifreeze.
3. Change oil and filter.
4. Change Racor fuel filter.
5. Change transmission oil.
6. Spray fog into air inlet while cranking engine slowly.

Haven't had a problem yet and she starts easily each spring.
Short and to the point. Thank you!

Dan
10-20-2007 02:18 PM
JimsCAL The annual winterization for my raw water cooled Universal for the last 18 years has been:
1. Run engine on fresh water until warm.
2. Drain fresh water and fill with antifreeze.
3. Change oil and filter.
4. Change Racor fuel filter.
5. Change transmission oil.
6. Spray fog into air inlet while cranking engine slowly.

Haven't had a problem yet and she starts easily each spring.
10-20-2007 11:25 AM
JohnRPollard
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueBlue View Post
John - You're correct regarding thermostat location, but I wasn't taking any chances with the new-to-me boat. My last boat did not have a heat exchanger and was raw water cooled . . . this stubborn old dog can't be taught new tricks I suppose.

I neglected to mention that the real reason for running the engine to normal operating temp, was to fully warm the oil for draining and replacement with fresh oil. I prefer to do this during layup to eliminate most of the sulphuric acid, formed from the sulphur which is present in oil and in the diesel exhaust . . . not especially good for your engine.

Of course, engine pencil zinc anodes are also changed along with oil and fuel primary/secondary filters - naturally, before filling the crankcase with new oil. Biocide added to fuel tanks, electrical connections cleaned and sprayed, battery electrolyte topped off . . . etc.

But now I'm wandering into other boat winterization topics - perhaps more info than the OP asked for.

True Blue,

Truth be told, with our first boat I did exactly as you described for a couple years until someone pointed out the heat exchanger/thermostat issue. All the other engines I had previously assisted with winterizing were raw water cooled, so the heat exchanger twist was new to me.

But you're right, for all the reasons you described it would be good to heat the engine up. I usually take the boat for a hard spin under power after completing those tasks to make sure the new lubricants and additives are fully circulated prior to lay-up. Then the antifreeze gets added.

Capnhand,

We usually leave the boat in the water for the winter anyway. But when it does get hauled, our marina has a push/pull boat with which they move the boats to the travellift, as most boats are winterized prior to haul-out.
10-20-2007 10:37 AM
neil36 New boat for us, and the genset's westerbeke is in need of a starter solenoid, which I wouldn't get to before winter....is it possible to use air pressure to blow out the raw water cooling side, instead of drawing in antifreeze? Can the block be drained?
10-20-2007 10:07 AM
TrueBlue John - You're correct regarding thermostat location, but I wasn't taking any chances with the new-to-me boat. My last boat did not have a heat exchanger and was raw water cooled . . . this stubborn old dog can't be taught new tricks I suppose.

I neglected to mention that the real reason for running the engine to normal operating temp, was to fully warm the oil for draining and replacement with fresh oil. I prefer to do this during layup to eliminate most of the sulphuric acid, formed from the sulphur which is present in oil and in the diesel exhaust . . . not especially good for your engine.

Of course, engine pencil zinc anodes are also changed along with oil and fuel primary/secondary filters - naturally, before filling the crankcase with new oil. Biocide added to fuel tanks, electrical connections cleaned and sprayed, battery electrolyte topped off . . . etc.

But now I'm wandering into other boat winterization topics - perhaps more info than the OP asked for.
10-20-2007 08:41 AM
CapnHand http://www.ays.com/library/Universal_Manual_2.pdf

Winter storage starting on pg 17 for fresh and sea water cooled engines. Cooling system arrangements starting on pg 36. If the cooling system arrangement looks the same on the Yanmar, the winterization process should be the same, yes?

This has me scratching my head. If you winterize the engine before haul out, how do you move the boat to the lift? What am I missing?
10-19-2007 06:02 PM
JohnRPollard TrueBlue,

I agree, I prefer to winterize while still in the water too. All around, it's just a lot easier.

That sounds like a good method you used when your boat was hauled out, but I would have thought it unnecessary for a "fresh water cooled" engine (by which I assume we both mean an engine equipped with a heat exchanger). On our boat at least (Yanmar 3GM30F), the thermostat is not in the raw water/heat exchanger loop, but rather is in the closed "fresh water" side of the cooling system which already contains antifreeze. So it's not necessary on our boat to warm the engine up in order to get the winterizing antifreeze fully into the raw water system.

Does your boat have a thermostat in the raw water side of the cooling system? That seems improbable, but who knows? Certainly no harm in doing it the way you described, but I'm wondering was it necessary? Perhaps I've missed something...
10-19-2007 04:51 PM
TrueBlue
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnRPollard View Post
Another question that comes to mind if the boat is on the hard when you do the winterization:

On the raw water cooled engines, wouldn't the engine need to be run long enough for it to warm up and for the thermostat to open? If the engine is cold when you run the anti-freeze through the system, won't the antifreeze largely bypass the engine block because of the closed thermostat?

I suppose you could bypass the thermostat by temporarily removing it.

In a system equipped with a heat exchanger, you only have to worry about filling the intake lines, exchanger, and exhaust with anti-freeze, since the engine block already contains it.
For this reason, I normally winterize the engine before end of season haul-out. The first season with this boat however, it was hauled out and brought inside for barriercoating the bottom - prior to winterizing the engine.

After bottom work was completed she was moved back out to sub freezing conditions. So, using a 5 gal pail with a hose leading from it to the raw water strainer, a long garden hose was then led from the same pail to a boatyard water tap. After filling the bucket with the garden hose I started the engine with the hose's nozzle adjusted to the water pump's draw rate, and ran it for several minutes to reach operating temperature.

I then shut off the hose nozzle when a couple gallons of water was left in the pail while pouring two gallons of undiluted antifreeze into the bucket - killing the engine when the antifreeze was seen ejecting from the wet exhaust. My engine is fresh water cooled, but this process assured me of the proper 50/50 mix and a total fill, of the raw water sections of the engine.
10-19-2007 04:33 PM
petegingras I concur with Jeffh and the "fog" process is not needed. In New England, i've winterized three yanmars, 2QM, 3QM, & the 4 series (only the 2QM was raw water cooled). Never have i removed the fule injector during winterizing.

I'm hessitant to add any thing to the fuel system, but the fuel. And engine block drain, i assume you mean change the oil? That, i'd do, but repalce/refill the oil.
10-19-2007 04:30 PM
USCGRET1990 If you use the green anti-freeze, be sure to catch it and dispose of properly. It is poisonous to most lifeforms. There are newer extended life permenant antifreezes that range in color from amber to red. They are much more expensive.
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