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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Winter Sailing
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Thread: Winter Sailing Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-01-2009 09:59 AM
RealityCheck It is really nice to read and see photos of the cold winter problems some sailors have.

Reminds me of why I am where I am!!
12-01-2009 03:37 AM
mitiempo Being a Westcoaster, my boats are always in the water all year and I've never winterized an engine. Neither have my neighbors. The water is salt and as long as there is some heat on the boat no problem. The heater set to come on near freezing is a good idea. As I now live aboard it's always quite warm. I was going to post a pic of my marina last December under lots of snow but couldn't find one so this will have to do. Not me or my boat but a cool pic.
12-01-2009 01:47 AM
davidpm
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrh40cal View Post
So, to winterize the ball valve, after the engine is filled with anti-freeze, I blow into the secondary hose and open the seacock until I hear bubles blowing out the bottom of the boat, then close the valve. Then I fill up the secondary hose with anti-freeze until it is above the water line. Then open and close the seacock again, allowing the antifreeze to sink down into the ball valve.
Is this common practice? I'm pretty sure my yard doesn't go this far.
10-15-2008 03:56 PM
thedinghysailor I think my neighbor has an ice eater for a pet...
11-15-2007 10:51 AM
sailingdog IIRC, pouring oil into the water is a MARPOL violation, even if it is just vegetable oil. If the local LEO's see the oil on the water and trace it back to your boat, you might be in some trouble. The fines for pretty nasty... the law doesn't distinguish between petroleum-based oil and vegetable-based oils as far as I can tell.

Quote:
Discharge of Oil and Other Hazardous Substances

Regulations issued under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act require all vessels with propulsion machinery to have a capacity to retain oil mixtures on board.
  • You are not allowed to discharge oil or hazardous substances. The penalty for illegal discharge may be a fine up to $10,000.
  • You are not allowed to dump oil into the bilge of the vessel without means for proper disposal. Fuel spills can be removed using absorbent bilge pads.
  • You must discharge oil waste to a reception facility. On recreational vessels, a bucket or bailer is adequate.
  • You must immediately notify the U.S. Coast Guard if your vessel discharges oil or hazardous substances in the water. Call toll-free 1-800-424-8802. Report the dischargeís location, color, source, substances, size, and time observed.
  • If your vessel is 26 feet or longer, you must display a 5 x 8 inch placard made of durable material, fixed in a conspicuous place in the machinery spaces, or at the bilge pump control station, stating the following:
Quote:
Discharge of Oil Prohibited

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act prohibits the discharge of oil or oily waste upon or into any navigable waters of the U.S. The prohibition includes any discharge which causes a film or discoloration of the surface of the water or causes a sludge or emulsion beneath the surface of the water. Violators are subject to substantial civil and/or criminal sanctions including fines and imprisonment.
Quote:
Originally Posted by andydroit View Post
I wet stored my boat last year, with saildrives. I can shut off the raw water where it enters the boat, but there is still salt water in the sail drive leg. I don't winter sail, and was concerned that antifreeze would mix with seawater and become ineffective. I ended up winterizing the engine with antifreeze, thru the raw water strainer, then, with the engine off, poured some cooking oil into the raw water strainer until it showed up in the water outside the hull. This stuff is edible, so I assume non-toxic, and it floats on top of the salt water, not mixing. It stayed in the saildrive over the winter. Also, not a conductive medium, so should help galvanic corrosion.
Any thoughts?
11-15-2007 10:15 AM
christyleigh It's a small amphibian imported from Iceland that lives on ice.
11-15-2007 10:05 AM
davidpm What is an ice eater. Around hear they use bubblers
11-14-2007 01:34 PM
andydroit
freeze protection

I wet stored my boat last year, with saildrives. I can shut off the raw water where it enters the boat, but there is still salt water in the sail drive leg. I don't winter sail, and was concerned that antifreeze would mix with seawater and become ineffective. I ended up winterizing the engine with antifreeze, thru the raw water strainer, then, with the engine off, poured some cooking oil into the raw water strainer until it showed up in the water outside the hull. This stuff is edible, so I assume non-toxic, and it floats on top of the salt water, not mixing. It stayed in the saildrive over the winter. Also, not a conductive medium, so should help galvanic corrosion.
Any thoughts?
11-14-2007 11:21 AM
mrh40cal
wintering in the water

To the original thread... The only thing I don't think I saw covered is the seacock. If you leave the boat in and re-winterize after sailing, be sure to get the 'raw' water out of the ball valve. I have a T-fitting above my seacock with a ball valve attached that gives me the ability to winterize without removing hoses. So, to winterize the ball valve, after the engine is filled with anti-freeze, I blow into the secondary hose and open the seacock until I hear bubles blowing out the bottom of the boat, then close the valve. Then I fill up the secondary hose with anti-freeze until it is above the water line. Then open and close the seacock again, allowing the antifreeze to sink down into the ball valve.

To labatt regarding keeping a boat in the water in Annapolis... I keep my boat on Rock Creek outside Baltimore. This will be the 5th winter in the water. We have ice eaters and it keeps the ice off the boat. My creek freezes hard enough to keep a thrown brick from penatrating, so it is a hard freeze. Just winterize thoroughly and make sure ice eaters keep the ice away from the hull. You do risk scratches and some minor damage from ice as the boat will move around in the hole in the ice where it can rub. I have had no problems with this, but it can happen. Good luck.
11-14-2007 11:11 AM
Newport28Defiant
Emergency Bilge pump

If you install a y-valve as suggested, it will also make for an excellent emergency bilge pump if you run the (fresh water) hose long enough to reach into the bilge. It is pretty amazing how much water the engine can pump out the exhaust when it is running.
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