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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Sailboat Design and Construction > Standing rigging
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-06-2007 07:06 PM
KeelHaulin Jeff-

Could you explain how rod rigging is easier to inspect? What would be considered a normal lifespan for rod rigging and how much longer than equivalent wire?

I was always under the impression that rod rigging is going to cost quite a bit more in purchase and maintenance because the only way to service it is by hiring a rigger with the proper x-ray equipment. With wire rigging a good visual inspection every few months should be all that's necessary until you discover a meathook or a cracked swage, etc. If you discover any signs of fatigue "it's time" to replace it; while rod rigging if not inspected for fatigue cracking with x-ray equipment is potentially a catastrophic failure risk (depending on it's age and amount of use). It seems to me that wire rigging is far more forgiving in terms of determining when it is time to replace it; can you explain why not?
12-05-2007 02:23 PM
Jeff_H The big thing about rod is that it has a much longer lifespan and is actually more reliable and easier to inspect. It also offers significant reduction in stretch for a given weight, strength and diameter.

Most wire rigging failures are at the terminals. Its true that with really shot wire rigging you get a meathook, but typically long before the meathook shows the wire has lost its strength.

Jeff
12-05-2007 01:59 PM
sailingdog TB—

I never said you were aging... any inferences you make are completely your own...
12-05-2007 01:42 PM
TrueBlue I never said it happened to me - and it hasn't. My rigging wire is very sound (as far as my aging eyes can tell, that is . . . ).
12-05-2007 01:39 PM
sailingdog I know that you were being facetious. but as you get older, the eyesight starts to go...
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueBlue View Post
I was being ficitious SD, just as "no-see-ums" can be seen, but usually only after you swat them dead against your biten skin.
12-05-2007 01:22 PM
TrueBlue I was being ficitious SD, just as "no-see-ums" can be seen, but usually only after you swat them dead against your biten skin.
12-05-2007 01:20 PM
sailingdog They're just hard to see prior to blooding them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueBlue View Post
SD,
If they weren't invisible, then the scores of impaled sailors with bloodied body parts, must all be blind.
12-05-2007 01:18 PM
max-on
Quote:
Originally Posted by labatt View Post
Max-on - I'd question the reason behind it. Yes, you get some increased breaking strength and decreased stretch and save some weight, but from what I understand - you pay A LOT for that. For safety (inspection) reasons I think I'd pick it over rod, but only if I was putting together an offshore racer and had a reason to pay the extra money.
Labatt, you may have not understood by question; the rigger recommended standard wire, I asked him about dyform, and he said it was not worth it. I was in a rush and late for an appointment that day and did not have time to inquire as to why, so I was curious as to the reason for his response. I did not know dyform is 'so' much more expensive, that is probably the reason for his comment.
12-05-2007 01:13 PM
labatt Max-on - I'd question the reason behind it. Yes, you get some increased breaking strength and decreased stretch and save some weight, but from what I understand - you pay A LOT for that. For safety (inspection) reasons I think I'd pick it over rod, but only if I was putting together an offshore racer and had a reason to pay the extra money.
12-05-2007 01:02 PM
TrueBlue SD,
If they weren't invisible, then the scores of impaled sailors with bloodied body parts, must all be blind.
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