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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > finding the perfect dingy
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Thread: finding the perfect dingy Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-26-2007 05:03 PM
jbarros
I'm flattered

Wow,

I honestly didn't think I'd be remembered, but I'm flattered.

I'm digging through information on the wayfarer association website now, as well as a few of the other boats mentioned.

Thanks.


-- James
12-26-2007 04:40 PM
Johnrb "Hello, My name is James and I was on this forum LONG ago"

This sounds like a personal introduction at a "Sailnet Anonymous" meeting.

Welcome back, I too remember your contributions. I also agree with Tenuki's suggestion that you take a look at the Wayfarer. They are pretty common on the Canadian side of the Great Lakes since Abbot makes them and have an excellent reputation for stability and safety (for a daysailor) with decent performance.

Here is the long distance voyage that Tenuki referred to:
http://www.amazon.com/Ocean-Crossing.../dp/0713675683
12-26-2007 12:46 PM
Jeff_H Welcome back James. I kind of missed your frequently thought-provoking questions.

I would suggest that you look for a self-rescuing design, by which I mean a boat with adequate floatation tanks near the rail that it will float high out of the water and can be righted and will drain if swamped. A properly configured Wayfarer isn't a bad choice. Some other options that come to mind might include the Jet 14, Flying Jr., Pearson Lark 14, the Explorer 14, and perhaps the Oday Daysailer (a little outside your weight range).

Jeff
12-26-2007 10:13 AM
sailingdog After looking at the Wayfarer, I'd say that it might be a good choice. It's about the same weight as the Jersey Skiff and probably avaiable used in your budget range.
12-25-2007 11:28 PM
tenuki Wayfarers have been sailed from Scotland to Iceland and across the North sea several times. Plus, you can pick one up used for the price range you are looking for. They also have a spinnaker and an active west coast racing class.
12-25-2007 09:22 PM
sailingdog James-

That's why I recommended the decked version of the boat, which has a closed off fore deck. Most small boats of this size are unballasted and have full flotation.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarros View Post
The jersey skiff is beautiful, although I must admit to some trepidation in my head about taking something that looks much different than an oversized wind surfer out there for fear of swamping her, whereas if there's no cavity in the boat, there's nothing to swamp. I suppose I should get over that fear and actually try to get a ride in some of these things.

-- James
12-25-2007 08:46 PM
jbarros The jersey skiff is beautiful, although I must admit to some trepidation in my head about taking something that looks much different than an oversized wind surfer out there for fear of swamping her, whereas if there's no cavity in the boat, there's nothing to swamp. I suppose I should get over that fear and actually try to get a ride in some of these things.

-- James
12-25-2007 12:06 PM
7Psych Sailingdog...You have a PM.........
12-25-2007 10:24 AM
sailingdog The Jersey Skiff I mentioned is only 360 lbs... with a trailer it's probably not much more than your motorcycle and trailer... it's design is based on old rescue skiffs, so it is pretty seaworthy, especially if you get the decked in version.
12-25-2007 06:00 AM
tenuki Harpoon 5.2, although hitting the heavy side of things, still under 500lbs
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