SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Cheoy Lee Offshore 40
 Not a Member? 


Thread: Cheoy Lee Offshore 40 Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
09-24-2010 12:44 PM
QuickMick There has been a 41' for sale at the marina ive been climbing around. lots of wood to maintain. Extremely roomy and cozy cabin. very pretty lines too. If she needs much work someone had mentioned to me that a lot of the parts (ie the winches stamped CL) were custom made for the yard and can be a PITA to replace if you want matching origianl stuff, but the user who is doing the resto could probably help you out there.

I think she is a real beauty.

oh, and imho venice is a magical place, though for beauty i prefered the almafi coast, isle of capri and lake como--but its tough to top rome
09-24-2010 12:23 PM
dancamp I've owned a Cheoy Lee built Offshore 40 sloop rig sailboat now for almost 4 years and absoulutely adore it in all respects. And she sails (points) into the wind beautifully so don't worry about that. The teak upkeep is a little daunting, but well worth it.
I've started a forum particularly dedicated to the Cheoy Lee Offshore 40 and the Rhodes Reliant that you may find interesting and informative. Hopefully you will join in and contribute.
Rhodes Reliant & Offshore 40 forum :: Index
08-22-2010 12:32 AM
jandrade I just tore off the teak deck on my 72 Luders 36.. had delamination on the staboard side and bow but not the port side. I ended up taking up the laminate and here is what I discovered: Login | Facebook

2 1/2" planks.. I though they were teak but when they dried out it seemed more like pine.. I'd love an opinion on what they actualy are... althought.. as of last week I now have a healthy, closed-foam cored new deck on top of the old one, which I fixed anyway... and a nice glass skin ready for awlgrip and nonskid...

and you can jump up and down on the deck and the boat moves on the stands more instead of flexing the deck...still would like to know what kind of wood you think that is.
06-11-2010 03:45 PM
svHyLyte Jeeze--

Talk about Thread Drift/High jacking...

To get back to Ganderbay's question:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganderbay View Post
I am currently looking to buy this boat and I am very interested in views of other boat owners or others familiar with this boat. It has been recently upgraded (new mast, standing rigging, engine etc.
Thanks.
Ernie.
We sailed a 1963 Rhodes Reliant in San Francisco for quite some while in the early to mid-70's. She was a beautiful yacht and very well built (teak decking over glass). There was, however, a heck of a lot of brightwork and the maintenance requirement was terrific. The yacht sported a yawl rig (frequently called a ketch but the mizzen was aft of the rudder post so properly a yawl) and on a broad reach with all sails flying, including the mizzen staysail (more a spinnaker), she'd move right along but, with a 27' water line, really pretty slow for her size. She didn't point worth a darn so a close reach was the hardest we'd push her.

We loved feel and look of the boat but finally gave her up for a somewhat smaller, more simple, easier to maintain 1976 Cal.

FWIW...
06-11-2010 10:54 AM
thalassa2444 I own a Cheoy Lee Offshore 40. They don't make them like that anymore. But unless the boat has been restored professionally you'll have a heck of a project. I purchased mine in 2007, and have been "restroing" her through the winters and sailing in the summers. This summer I'm not launching. I'm spending a year out of the water to complete the restoration.
04-30-2010 09:59 AM
reed1v
which reminds me

yup. there are a lot of "boat building" schools up here in maine. just dont understand why they teach kids to screw, nail, and glue stuff together to make a wooden boat. boats should be flexible and made of wood, not some cheap solution. if they wanted to teach real history and making real boats that last, they should study the old dories and skiffs. of course maybe building as they did 130 years ago is not de rigueur today.
kinda like mast tuning. some folks keep their standing rigging so tight, and then they wonder why stress cracks appear in their decks. duh. on wooden boats that will kill a ship quicker than a rocky shore.
04-29-2010 08:55 PM
sailingdog LOL... yeah, salt and iron don't play well with each other.
Quote:
Originally Posted by reed1v View Post
depends on the oxygen level of the waters. anerobic conditions will leave almost any organic materials unaltered, salt or no salt. your right about salt boxes. my task as a child was to fill the salt boxes aboard my grandfather's schooner in the summers. we also salted the bilges. but then again, his boat did not have much iron. only trunnels, wooden spikes, and interlocking beams.
04-29-2010 08:06 PM
reed1v
logs bogs mud

depends on the oxygen level of the waters. anerobic conditions will leave almost any organic materials unaltered, salt or no salt. your right about salt boxes. my task as a child was to fill the salt boxes aboard my grandfather's schooner in the summers. we also salted the bilges. but then again, his boat did not have much iron. only trunnels, wooden spikes, and interlocking beams.
04-29-2010 04:58 PM
sailingdog I'd point out that most woods won't rot all that well when submersed in SALT WATER... however, the wood in your deck would likely have more fresh water than saltwater getting to it, unless you like sailing with the boat inverted. This is one reason old wooden ships used to keep blocks of salt in the bilge...

I'd be a lot more impressed if Venice was in fresh water, since you're comparing apples to oranges.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eolon View Post
btw, if you really wanted a core that won't rot you would use european larch. The foundations of the city of Venice were built of larch logs, and they have survived being under seawater for 800 years.

Best Regards,


e

.::.
04-29-2010 03:45 PM
reed1v
venice?

and venice smells as such. btw: most wood that grows well in bogs resist rot. i forgot which company use to put iron stringers in their fiberglass hulls to stiffen them up a bit. great idea except glass, like concrete absorbs water. was not a good idea as it turned out. remember dick fisher use to fuss about what to fill the whaler shells with because invariably water will get in there. btw: the old whaler pic where the boat was sawn in half. that was his son. dicy shot. sure would not sink but would tip over.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:02 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.