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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > The mystery of the Marine Environment
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Thread: The mystery of the Marine Environment Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-15-2008 01:33 PM
Maine Sail
My drill press..

It's funny, when we first bought our house on the ocean, we still had two homes. One of the first tools I brought from inland was my drill press. We then took a three week sailing vacation and when I came back my drill press had gone from looking really good, for a ten year old drill press, to looking like the photo in a very short time! Before I brought the rest of my tools up to the new house and I did coat them first and gave most a good coating. The only tools I have that look like that are my Roto Zip, Bench Grinder and my Drill Press... One of these days I'll get a new one, and treat it better, but the parts that matter still work fine even though it looks like crap...

Moving from inland to the ocean gives new meaning to "care and feeding of tools"....

I now also have a de-humidifier in my barn/work shop and a pellet stove for winter and they really help..
03-15-2008 01:17 PM
xtatico1404 yes agree that there are some things that need to be marinized....but a lot of things do not. I guess it depends on the object, and of course there will be regions where corrossion is harsher, such as in the tropics.

Yes corrossion can be major in some things. I spent 4 years on an aircraft carrier working with fueling the aircraft. Every time that we pulled into port it was a huge battle against corrossion. We would strip the stations down to bare steel, prime it, paint it, and after pulling back in, the same thing would be done. Corrossion did not attack the fuel pipes at all (just some paine needed every now and then, but the stanchions that hold the pipes in place, heavily corroded.

I certainly agree that TV (from Walmart), rigging (marinized), safety gear (marinized).....a lot of the interior stuff can be non-marinized.
03-15-2008 12:54 PM
LarryandSusanMacDonald
Quote:
Thanks for cutting thru the hype Chuck. You are entirely correct. What is the value in paying 8 times the price for an item when it will only last twice as long? Especially for creature-feature type stuff? Now I don't skimp on the stuff that keeps me upright and afloat, but a maranized cd player? No thanks! A 38-dollar unit from Wally World works fine and I throw it away when it corrodes.
Couldn't agree more. I have two 20lb propane tanks I picked up at home depot for about $25. each. Had to replace them when they mandated that overflow device thingy - but compared to the $300. west marine wants for aluminum? Mine are just fine. The first set lasted 5 years, the second is going on six and they're just fine - I keep them in a custom box on the back deck. I'm sixty two years old. Do the math. $50 for 2 or $600 for 2 and they'll last ten years, easy. Let's see, I'd have to live to be 122. We're currently on the Chesapeake also, but have accumulated several years in Florida and the Bahamas.

I personally have a little salt encrustation but I'm planning on taking a shower someday.
03-15-2008 12:44 PM
chucklesR Alright gentlemen, post pictures of your pristine drill presses or leave poor Hal alone.

Mine, at 5 years old, looks like Hal's but dustier because of the oil trapping the dust.
03-15-2008 10:50 AM
TrueBlue
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
I think Sailaway's right... what you don't see it the three identical drill presses in the same room, one of which has been coated with WD40, one with light machine oil and one with Boeshield T9. Halekai is only showing the control unit.
Inquiring minds want to know - hal, which of the three test sample drill presses is shown in your photo, the one with oil, WD40 or Boeshield T-9, so we know which to avoid?
03-15-2008 10:15 AM
sailingdog I think Sailaway's right... what you don't see it the three identical drill presses in the same room, one of which has been coated with WD40, one with light machine oil and one with Boeshield T9. Halekai is only showing the control unit.
03-15-2008 10:09 AM
sailaway21 That is NOT just a drill press. That's a corrosion test sample! Notice the bronze control piece on the table along with the fine wire test sample in the chuck? hal's on the case. Results appearing in a sailing mag, or not, in the fall. (g)
03-15-2008 09:49 AM
TrueBlue I also live on the coast, actually an island, with a salt water beach off our back yard on the Sakonnet. The back end of my garage is set up with a shop and crammed with tools - all subject to rust and corrosion from the sea air . . . but I won't allow it.

No offence halekai, but your drill press is a sorry sight. (g) Why haven't you coated all your steel tools with a rag dampened with light machine oil? At least spray WD40 over them, or what I use, Boeshield T-9.
03-15-2008 09:30 AM
sailingdog Halekai-

It's obvious from that photo that all of your tools are in sad state of neglect... I'm going to have to call the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Tools and Equipment. They'll be over with a bucket full of brass bristle toothbrushes...

Not everything needs to be marinized... but it also depends on the boat too. On a Gunboat 62, with its high freeboard, and exceptionally dry ride and air conditioning... I'm pretty sure the 42" HDTV they have in the salon and the two stereo systems are off the shelf from Best Buy or Tweeter. On a Cape Dory 25 or Corsair 28, both of which are far smaller and wetter boats, the electronics inside the cabin would probably be much happier if they were marinized.


Anything related to the safety and operation of the boat, like the list Halekai has mentioned:

Quote:
USCG rated fuel line, seacocks, AWAB hose clamps, UL tinned marine grade wire, plotter, radar, standing rigging, sheets and lines, Sunbrella, Strataglass, Starboard (plastic lumber), exterior varnish, VHF antenna and VHF, EPIRB, USCG flares, on and on etc. etc..
really should be "marine" grade.
03-15-2008 08:13 AM
Maine Sail
I have tons..

I have tons of non marine grade stuff on my boat. My iPod, my stereo, the cabin speakers, the "imitation" Ultrasuede interior fabric ($14.00 per yard as opposed to $70.00), every pot, pan, dish, spoon, knife and fork, our pepper grinder, our sheets, pillows, faucets, pats organizer bins, PB Blaster, throw rugs, Varathane oil based polyurethane for my cabin sole on and on etc. etc.

There are however things I do have that are marine grade. USCG rated fuel line, seacocks, AWAB hose clamps, UL tinned marine grade wire, plotter, radar, standing rigging, sheets and lines, Sunbrella, Strataglass, Starboard (plastic lumber), exterior varnish, VHF antenna and VHF, EPIRB, USCG flares, on and on etc. etc..


I buy from Wal*Mart when ever I can and do my part to support the Chinese instead of my fellow Americans who take joy in ripping us off every day at West Marine with 600% margins on some items!!

The bottom line is that living on the ocean I do see stuff wear out at my house only slightly less than on the boat if it's in the barn, shed or out doors. In the house with heating and cooling systems I see NO rust or corrosion on my electronic components and I eventually do on the boat...

80% + humidity on the inside of my boat during the summer and 50% or bellow inside my house during the summer months and they are 100 yards apart.. The difference is the humidity control afforded by my HVAC system..


This is what the ocean does at my house!! Perhaps i should have purchased a marine grade drill press?
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