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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Fishfinder or depth sounder
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Thread: Fishfinder or depth sounder Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-24-2009 04:41 AM
noelex77
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
The only problem with getting one of the Garmin/Lowrance/Hummingbird combination GPS chartplotter/fish finders is that the wind instruments won't be able to talk to them, and can't estimate true wind speed then. If you don't use electronic wind instruments... you're home free.
The Raymarine ST60 wind instruments wont display true wind from a gps derived SOG. For expensive up market wind instrument they should be able to do this. Other wind instruments will.
05-23-2009 07:09 PM
Cemseller
New Question, Same Line

I have an In Hull Transducer, old but still there. Has anyone rewired one of these to a new fishfinder was planning on buying one but didn't know if it would work.

Thanks
03-16-2008 09:35 PM
T34C Polysulfite caulk works very well to attach the puck style transducers for shoot thru hull aplications. It will set-up fairly solidly and doesn't flex like silicone and screw up the reading.

While it is true that these combo units cannot "talk" to your wind instruments, I'm not sure what they would have to say even if they could. The best case senario would be that you could have one display that could toggle thru multiple instruments, but I'm not convinced I would want that anyway. I like the idea of having all the data on screen right in front of me.
03-16-2008 05:12 PM
Valiente
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryL View Post
Hello,

If your boat has a solid fiberglass hull, installing the transducer should take about 1 minute. You can use a 'puck' type transducer instead of a through hull. You don't need to epoxy the transducer or mount it in a tube filled with oil. All you need is some toilet bowl wax (about $1.00 from Home Depot, etc.). Press a wad of wax onto the hull where you want to place the transducer, then press the transducer into the wax.

I did this about a year ago. I originally planned on using the wax to find a good location, and then epoxying it in. However, since it has worked great, I have no reason to glue it down.

Good luck,
Barry
I used a smear of 4200 in front of the keel root, aimed about 8-10 degrees forward. That gives me the view directly beneath my bow, and the depth is "my keel plus six inches for waterline variables"!
03-16-2008 12:49 PM
sailboy21 Some of the companies state in their product description that the in hull transducers work as good if not better than the thu-hull types. Toilet bowl wax sounds good. I had similar results with "shoe goo." Sometimes you have to play around with location due to trapped air in the laminate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryL View Post
Hello,

If your boat has a solid fiberglass hull, installing the transducer should take about 1 minute. You can use a 'puck' type transducer instead of a through hull. You don't need to epoxy the transducer or mount it in a tube filled with oil. All you need is some toilet bowl wax (about $1.00 from Home Depot, etc.). Press a wad of wax onto the hull where you want to place the transducer, then press the transducer into the wax.

I did this about a year ago. I originally planned on using the wax to find a good location, and then epoxying it in. However, since it has worked great, I have no reason to glue it down.

Good luck,
Barry
03-16-2008 12:47 PM
Quickstep192
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
The only problem with getting one of the Garmin/Lowrance/Hummingbird combination GPS chartplotter/fish finders is that the wind instruments won't be able to talk to them, and can't estimate true wind speed then. If you don't use electronic wind instruments... you're home free.

I prefer the Garmin units, since some of their models have all of the US coastal water charts pre-loaded and they seem to have the best user interface and software of the different brands.
This is a good point. Why can't Raymarine provide functionality on their chartplotters that would let them display a wind instrument? Seem like it would be easy to do.
03-16-2008 12:10 PM
BarryL
mounting transducers

Hello,

If your boat has a solid fiberglass hull, installing the transducer should take about 1 minute. You can use a 'puck' type transducer instead of a through hull. You don't need to epoxy the transducer or mount it in a tube filled with oil. All you need is some toilet bowl wax (about $1.00 from Home Depot, etc.). Press a wad of wax onto the hull where you want to place the transducer, then press the transducer into the wax.

I did this about a year ago. I originally planned on using the wax to find a good location, and then epoxying it in. However, since it has worked great, I have no reason to glue it down.

Good luck,
Barry
03-16-2008 10:03 AM
US27inKS
Quote:
Originally Posted by merttan View Post
Quick tip: If you install the transducent to your rudder instead of the hull you will avoid another hole to create problems and can get readings wider than fixed installation. My transducent is installed on the back of the rudder and I can get readings of the wider area beneath the boat by turning the rudder left and right...
I have a garmin fish finder. I epoxied the depth transducer to the inside of the hull under the v berth. It works great and it tells me I'm going to hit something just in time to hang on. Most fish finder transducers that I've seen are not easily mounted on my transom since it is angled and out of the water.

One other problem that I had was how to mount the speed transducer. Garmin doesn't offer a thru hull transducer for my fishfinder. I solved this by building a small solid fiberglass "transom" and gluing it to the bottom with 4200 between the keel and rudder.
03-16-2008 03:16 AM
Valiente
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
And I'm not big on fishing

When there is a need for knowing the depth, a depth sounder can do just that. And no more.

A fish finder provides a whole range of info like the shape of the bottom and the make-up of the sea bed (rock, sand, etc). Many of the better ones have forward-looking sonar that is also very useful.

And it can also see fish if that's of any value to you.
Not to mention shipwrecks, big rocks...they are fun to twiddle with. I got a monochrome Eagle fishfinder for the nav station because I could make the numbers quite large, large enough to be read from the cockpit. I kept the old, still functional cathode ring one as a backup, but really, I use the new one a lot more.

Another trick is to set the alarm for a known depth contour, like 10 metres or 30 feet or something that will stick out on a chart. Then you can follow the contour in fog knowing where you are not, if you follow, which can be quite helpful. For instance, if you find a nav aid that your DR tells you is near, and it's close to a known contour, you can be in fog at night and find it, and then literally get your bearings.

I'm no Luddite who would turn down a chartplotter, but give me a paper chart, a fishfinder (tells me when I've hit "shelly bits" or some unusual charted bottom state) and a compass, and I can usually find my way to safety.
03-15-2008 02:59 PM
Freesail99 I wonder if a fishfinder was called sonar would more people want them ?
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