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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Learning to Sail > Help me figure this out - planing upside down, or sailing a torpedo?
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Thread: Help me figure this out - planing upside down, or sailing a torpedo? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-21-2008 11:09 PM
ardoin Call me chicken and i type faster than i read (mask mast only one letter different )
I always thought it was the weight that made it easier for her to pull it off. Never planted my face in the mud but just about every time that boat went over we were working to free the mast from the mud. Vermillion Bay is shallow and muddy, managed to avoid the oyster and shell bars.
Now i'm missing the small boat... it was great fun.
04-21-2008 10:39 PM
Classic30
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardoin View Post
My girlfriend at the time used a technique where I would throw my body over the windward rail as she made the tack and then she would tighten the backstay and leave the jib up; "Screaming Reach" is a good name for it! But we seldom had big swells. I would usually scream as we would come close to flipping it. She said that pulling the backstay would pull the CE of the mainsail further back and keep the nose from diving.
That's a good idea! I guess it would - but only if you've got a backstay. Not all fractionals do..

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardoin View Post
It was a move she learned in Mobile Bay. I could never pull it off, so when i was at the helm I just reefed the jib in the tack. It may have something to do with the difference in body weight (she was 95lbs and i was 160lbs).
Weight isn't it - actually the more weight the better - but to pull it off you've got to be quick on your feet. Many a time I wasn't fast enough and the bow ploughed in.. Lancer-style!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardoin View Post
Glad you found good use in my recommendations Lancer28! If you are brave, try one of the variations of a Xtreem Screaming Reach and see if that will work as well. Just be prepared, more than once our boat capsized and we were pulling the mask out of the mud.
LOL! I assume you meant "mast", but given the speed at which the boat will capsize if you stuff it up (approximately the same speed as the wind!), if you happened to be near a mud bank at the time you just might be referring to your face!!
04-21-2008 10:23 PM
ardoin My girlfriend at the time used a technique where I would throw my body over the windward rail as she made the tack and then she would tighten the backstay and leave the jib up; "Screaming Reach" is a good name for it! But we seldom had big swells. I would usually scream as we would come close to flipping it. She said that pulling the backstay would pull the CE of the mainsail further back and keep the nose from diving. It was a move she learned in Mobile Bay. I could never pull it off, so when i was at the helm I just reefed the jib in the tack. It may have something to do with the difference in body weight (she was 95lbs and i was 160lbs).
Glad you found good use in my recommendations Lancer28! If you are brave, try one of the variations of a Xtreem Screaming Reach and see if that will work as well. Just be prepared, more than once our boat capsized and we were pulling the mask out of the mud.
04-21-2008 09:12 PM
Classic30 I used to have the same issues sailing the old Impulse dinghy (a 12' cat-rigged rocket-ship) in winds that I really shouldn't have been sailing in...

It took a bit of practice, but the basic technique was to make your less-than-gentle turn on the top of a wave and hike out the stern (literally over the stern of the boat) as hard as possible easing the mainsheet at the same time.

With the bow pointing skywards, the boat would then literally launch itself off the top of the wave you were on, skip off the back of the one in front and away you went on a "Screaming Reach" (the wind is screaming, the boat is screaming, you're screaming!..).

On a boat with a jib, it's a bit more controllable than it was for us: Pull in hard on the jib as you make the turn to depower the boat a bit, wait for the wave crest and then let it out to go flying. Timing is everything, but it's awesome fun!!
04-21-2008 12:14 PM
Lancer28 ardoin - I reproduced it yesterday, and it was too much jib / too round of a sail shape.

THANKS!
04-17-2008 09:27 PM
ardoin CE to far forward. Sounds like you were overpowered or too much jib.
Been there done that. Once the water start running over the bow you have
to correct the turn or you get washed off the boat. Turn gradually and the boat will not dip as fast. Another thing that worked if the wind wasn't too
strong was reefing the jib in the turn so the CE further back.
Had a small boat in Vermillion Bay and had the same problem when the
winds were brisk.
04-17-2008 08:35 PM
chris_gee You did have the bungs in?
04-17-2008 03:17 PM
poltergeist
Hmmmm

I took a look at the Stealth (manufactured by CL, right?) on the web, and now I'm as confused as you.

In your first post you mentioned having the main and jib up, but I understand the Stealth has a main and a "gennaker/assim spinnaker" on a retractable bowsprit. So assuming we're not quibbling about terminology here, if you were flying both sails (over 200 sq. ft. on a 14 ft. boat) could you simply have been overpowered? Traditional spinnakers with poles have big "shoulders" and tend to lift the bow ... I'm not sure that your assim wasn't pushing you down in a boat that light in 25+. Still, you said that upwind it sailed well. And in your last post, you said (if I understood) that you weren't flying the spinnaker because there was too much wind.

Looks like a very cool boat ... but I don't have a clue beyond that.

Kurt
04-17-2008 12:04 PM
Lancer28 Called the manufacturer.

They think that the jib had too much depth and asked me to be sure I wasn't using the spinnaker as a jib, because stock they don't have them and it is an add-on. (Of course I wasn't and the wind was just too high for a spin)

Does that sound right?
04-17-2008 11:55 AM
Lancer28 I was sitting as aft as possible, on a lake, not a river, no following waves and the boat is a stealth.

Sailormon6, your reply makes sense for what kept it underwater, but it wasn't a wave from the stern that dipped it in the first place - let me see if I can describe it - it was almost as if when I turned, the boat began to dig down.. I think that does it. Imagine being heeled over going upwind, then turning for a reach like going around a point on a course, and it is like the nose grabs and shoots underwater.
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