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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Last trip was almost the last trip.
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Thread: Last trip was almost the last trip. Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-28-2008 11:02 AM
Faster Thoroughly enjoyed your blog account... glad you were able to keep your sense of humour about you.. and survive the ordeal besides.

Lots of lessons learned, and there for others to learn from too. Well done.
05-28-2008 08:51 AM
Sasha_V All the way through the ending, where you were motoring into the marina I was expecting the next thing to be the same as what happened to me once...

We had just a finished a major overhaul including lovely two pack paint on topsides and deck. Fresh varnish on the rub rail, the whole works.
So we need to motor away form the working area and back into the normal berth. Easiest way to do this si also the most fun, just motor all the way out through the canal and then turn around in open water and come back in and take the canal branch to "home". Did al the geting out part, needed to give the engine some extra revs after the turn around to come back into the canal on a wave, once in immedieatly go to slow the motor and find the throttle is jammed wide open! (well, it was once I jiggled it, it wouldn't decrease, so I gave it a shove to loosen it, it went into wide open just fine, and wouldn't come any way back at all.) So we are blasting along this narrow canal, the diesel does not have a kill switch that works independently of the throttle and we are in a boat that has just cost a fortune to make pretty. No room to turn around....Scant second to do anything at all. It was interestiing.

I was so expecting you to get there with your tale too.

Glad you didn't.

Sasha

P.S It all turned out fine for us too.
05-28-2008 12:29 AM
sailingdog Not a bad idea..but some parts don't do well as used spares... and others aren't worth the hassle of installing. Head pumps are one thing that you generally leave well enough alone unless absolutely necessary.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wind_magic View Post
I wanted to add here that another way of doing this that I have read about and now try to do myself is when you buy a spare, install it! Then use your original as the spare. That way you know how to install it, you know you have the tools to install it, you know you have all of the parts you need, etc.

Working on a boat isn't like working on a home project. At home you can just jump in the car and run to the hardware store to pick up that little washer you dropped, or the screw that the manufacturer neglected to send along, etc. On a boat it's often .. well, slightly more difficult to get to the hardware store.
05-28-2008 12:24 AM
wind_magic You said ..

Quote:
Lesson #2: Carry 2 spares for everything. When something breaks, have the spare, and have the second spare for when the first spare breaks while waiting for the order.
I wanted to add here that another way of doing this that I have read about and now try to do myself is when you buy a spare, install it! Then use your original as the spare. That way you know how to install it, you know you have the tools to install it, you know you have all of the parts you need, etc.

Working on a boat isn't like working on a home project. At home you can just jump in the car and run to the hardware store to pick up that little washer you dropped, or the screw that the manufacturer neglected to send along, etc. On a boat it's often .. well, slightly more difficult to get to the hardware store.
05-28-2008 12:06 AM
wind_magic Murphy was an optimist. Great read.
05-28-2008 12:05 AM
jrd22 Good story and lot's of good lessons learned. You should be pretty proud of yourself for fixing/solving all that went wrong and apparently keeping your cool throughout. Think of it this way; you gained several seasons experience in one week, and you still have a girlfriend that wants to go sailing with you. Things could be a lot worse. Thanks for a good read.

John
05-27-2008 11:09 PM
Greenman That was a great read, informative and well written. Thank you, I look forwards to reading more in the future.
05-27-2008 01:47 PM
eherlihy
Quote:
Originally Posted by MysticGringo View Post
I will check out the Lavacs and add it to my list. I have more important things on their right now though.
When you get around to the head, you may also want to check out a composting toilet... I read a blog about a live aboard that is using one here. So far, he seems happy.

I have NO experience with them myself. But, if I were to replace a head, I would definitely check them out.
05-27-2008 12:20 PM
sailingdog A lot of having things go well have to do with massive amounts of preparation, which, if you don't own the boat, you really never see or realize.

Cam-

Going out in near gale force winds could seem idyllic if nothing breaks compared to what he went through...

Quote:
The thing I didn't like the sound of was when we came into port, and I told a guy who helped us when we got in about all the issues... he said, yup, seems normal. Having an issue or two is normal I think... having that many was not normal in my opinion. I grew up on boats, power boats, game fishing and diving. We never had this number of issues crop up in one trip... which gave me new respect for my dad and his preparation, and made me realize I need to do alot of work getting my boat set up more reliably.
05-27-2008 12:14 PM
camaraderie Welcome back MG & good blog read. Your GF is definitely a keeper if she can go through all that and still want to go again! Next time out will be idyllic!
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