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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Single handed
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Thread: Single handed Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-13-2007 02:37 PM
Boasun
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
I guess you could put up two anchoring daymarks and sleep for a few hours during the day. The signal of two round dayshapes over one another indicates that the boat is not under command IIRC. I think that if you're single handing, being awake at night is more important than being awake during the day... but it also depends on where you are at the time. Sleeping in the middle of a large shipping channel to a major harbor is asking to win a Darwin Award. Staying out of the shipping channels as much as possible is a good idea for small sailboats that are single handing.
SailingDog you have it correct: Not Under Command is; Two vertical black balls during the day and Two vertical all around red lights at night. But that don't relieve you of having to maintain a proper lookout. But it may by using those day shapes or light, keep you out of a little less trouble.
And a little less trouble may make the difference. But then you are depending on someone who may or may not be standing a proper lookout on one of those ships. And as to whether they see the Not Under Command shapes or lights may be another story.
A single hander was partially held at fault by the courts when he was ran down by a ship, because he was not standing a proper lookout. The only good part of his story was that he survived the collision.
But maybe someone can program a RaCon or a Sark to display a singlehander's code on a ship's radar and have it accept by SOLAS. Anything to make life safer out there.
03-13-2007 12:21 AM
sailingdog The no alcohol is very key...even small amounts of alcohol can impair your judgement and interfere with your night vision...
03-13-2007 12:17 AM
Freesail99 Sounds like great advise, Mark.
Thanks
03-13-2007 12:15 AM
Mkfcdl I can tell you what I did crossing the gulf of mexico by myself last fall: no sleeping at night PERIOD; stay out of shipping lanes except at the start and end (Galveston to Key West), sleep during daylight with a 30minute timer AND radar with a 10nm zone alarm (I would much rather have too many false echoes than miss one too close), use the autopilot routinely (uses power but saves fatigue), and heave to in bad weather and sleep. The final rule was no absolutely none whatsoever alcohol while on the voyage and no coffee after arriving and securing the boat and entering a blessed uninterrupted yes I am dead stage 10 REM (that's more than normal stage 4 sleep by one level per day of sleep deprivation)! And of course, that's one of the little blessings of single-handing: when the voyage is over and you really want to sleep, no one is pestering you to do the dishes or take them to get some real food to eat. Ha!

Cheers,
Mark
03-12-2007 09:33 PM
sailingdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by wumhenry
What good does stopping do? Isn't your chance of being run over by a ship the same whether you're moving or stationary? If so, sailing on autohelm while sleeping would improve your odds, by reducing time at sea.
The only time I think that stopping makes sense is if you're going to get close to shore or a major shipping lane if you don't stop. Otherwise, making progress towards your destination makes much more sense.
03-12-2007 08:38 PM
wumhenry
Quote:
Originally Posted by katytoo
I believe that Robert Manry who crossed the Atlantic in his 13 foot sloop "Tinkerbelle" used a bucket on a line that he tossed off the bow of his boat each night to act as a sea anchor. The sea anchor would cause his boat to basically stop in the water, and this would enable him to catch some sleep each night, though I'm not certain how much. It should also be possible to heave to for some sleep time, particularly if one used a sea anchor in conjunction with heaving to to prevent the boat from drifting backwards.
In today's world, with the greater volume of sea traffic that exists, some sort of alarm system, perhaps like the CARD system which sets off an alarm whenever it picks up a radar signal, could be used to avoid being run over in the middle of the night by some giant.
This system obviously would not work if racing offshore, but for one who is in no big hurry it might solve the sleep problem a bit better than catching catnaps for weeks on end.
What good does stopping do? Isn't your chance of being run over by a ship the same whether you're moving or stationary? If so, sailing on autohelm while sleeping would improve your odds, by reducing time at sea.
03-12-2007 08:06 PM
snider
Duh Huh!

Duh Huh! Let me guess, Tartan 34? Am I right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by snider
Hey Robert, I'm curious, what kind of boat do you have? Tell us about the windvane. Thanks Brandon
03-12-2007 08:02 PM
snider
Boat?

Hey Robert, I'm curious, what kind of boat do you have? Tell us about the windvane. Thanks Brandon

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tartan34C
My current boat is a 34 footer and she also sails herself and she does it better than I can.
All the best,
Robert Gainer

PS. On my current boat I am adding a windvane designed and built for my boat by Dr. David Parker. Itís a neat piece of gear.
03-07-2007 07:51 PM
Freesail99 This is a good post. But on the east coast of the USA and even into the Caribbean, you be hard pressed not to be able to find a place to set an anchor for the night. We are talking about crusing after all ..... And yes I know about Fl. and anchoring..
03-07-2007 07:42 PM
Tartan34C Why are people so hung up on windvanes? My first trans-Atlantic was in a 22 foot boat that steered herself without a wind vane and I did that trip solo without a windvane, electric system or engine and didnít have any problems. I have used windvanes on other boats but they are not 100% required on all boats.

My current boat is a 34 footer and she also sails herself and she does it better than I can.
All the best,
Robert Gainer

PS. On my current boat I am adding a windvane designed and built for my boat by Dr. David Parker. Itís a neat piece of gear.
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