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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Beneteau loses rudder..boat sinks
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Thread: Beneteau loses rudder..boat sinks Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
06-05-2008 09:45 PM
blt2ski While on the same subject, anyone know how the 36.7 rudder assembly is installed vs the 40 or 44? The 36 is one boat I might consider at some point in time, not that I would be sailing it in 7-12' seas, more likely up to 5' max in Puget sound.

The main thing I see, is no lives etc were lost or folks hurt etc.

Marty
06-05-2008 04:13 PM
sailingdog Rofl. point for Vasco...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasco View Post
font is larger?
06-05-2008 04:09 PM
Vasco font is larger?
06-05-2008 03:46 PM
sailingdog Ros-

Exactly how is that any different from the post that Vasco got from the Bendytoy's Google Group??
06-05-2008 03:27 PM
Ros
The Captains Story

This is the email from CB2 that was sent to me today:

All Members:

CB2 member Steve Rudiger forwarded the following message concerning Annapolis based Beneteau 40.7 Making Waves. Although it is very unfortunate that the vessel was lost, the story demonstrates the importance of handling the situation calmly and without panic, assessing the problem quickly, summoning the proper assistance, and making realistic decisions concerning the importance of people over things regardless of how fond we may be of them. There is a similar story of this same thing happening to a CAL 31 in Lake Erie last year in the June 2008 issue of SAIL. The situation was handled in much the same way and although the vessel sunk (later to be raised and recovered) there was no loss of life of injury.

Start of Message
Friends –

As some of you may have heard Making Waves, our Beneteau 40.7, sank 15 miles off the Long Island coast yesterday afternoon. All hands are safe and sound.

We were in the process of delivering the boat to Newport for the start of the Bermuda Ocean race. We were under sail in 5-7 foot seas with about 20-25 knots of breeze (both from our stern quarter) and the boat was sailing great, clipping double digit speeds coming off swells, when we heard a banging noise and lost steerage. When we investigated we discovered that the rudder tube had broken just above the hull joint and we were taking on water. We aren’t certain whether the rudder stock actually broke first or the tube it rides in, which in turn broke the rudder stock. In any event, we were able to control the flooding using our bilge pumps until the Coast Guard reached us with a 47’ motor life boat. The CG was initially also going to scramble a helicopter, but weather conditions scrapped that plan. A 100’+ trawler also answered our mayday and shadowed us until the Coast Guard released them. We had also set off the EPIRB and the VHF MMSI distress call, both of which the Coast Guard acknowledged receiving.

The Coast Guard took us in tow, but we were unable to keep the boat in line with the tow since we had no rudder control. Seas were now 7-9 feet with an occasional 12 footer and the additional force from veering back and forth apparently sheared the rudder post completely and we started taking on water at a much greater rate. On top of that, as we veered back and forth with the seas the tow line was putting heavy pressure on the forestay, and we were afraid we might take it out and bring the rig down. At that point we decided the prudent course of action was to accept a ride home with the government and they transferred the six of us to the MLB in 2 passes. That was a pretty interesting maneuver in itself – they actually brought the MLB right up to the leeward side of the boat in rolling seas and we walked/jumped/vaulted across to the waiting arms of the crew – I swear they didn’t scratch the gel coat. Water was mid-calf deep in the cabin when the last person came out, but it took nearly an hour for the boat to settle and sink in 165 feet of water – the CG had to hang around to make sure the boat would not be a hazard to navigation.

We were taken to Coast Guard Station Shinnecock (near the Hamptons) where the Guardsmen treated us warmly, feeding us and even offering us a ride to the Islip airport where we rented a van for the drive home. I can’t say enough about the professionalism and skill of the Coast Guard, particularly since most of the boat crew appeared to be barely out of high school. I am also very proud of the way our crew handled the situation. We worked through the problems efficiently and calmly which is why we got out of the situation with no injury or loss of life.

Guys and gals, I’m sorry we won’t be able to do the Bermuda Race and apologize to those who were coming to Bermuda to help us deliver Making Waves home. We will try to find some way to make it up to you. Anyone who had gear on board (Grant, David B., Mike, Larry, Bob, Alan, et al.) please let me know what was there and its value and we will submit it with our insurance claim and make you whole.

Many people have already called and e-mailed to express their concern about our well-being and sympathy over the loss of the boat – thank you for your thoughts. I am simply thankful that our crew is home and safe.

Jim
End of Message

Be safe and know that there are great folks out there ready to help, but plan for the unlikely event that something similar could happen to you – because it could.

Mike Everitt
Vice Commodore

06-05-2008 02:13 PM
sailingdog Actually, I have been further out, in heavier seas than that in my boat. Turned around when the seas were getting up past 14' or so... since I was soloing the boat and it wasn't really setup for soloing properly yet. Still working on that btw.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Giulietta View Post


But you don't sail 15 miles off shore and in 7 foot waves....
06-05-2008 02:03 PM
Giulietta
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Thanks for that post Vasco.

As I said earlier in this thread, the rudder in my boat is in a compartment that is sealed off from the rest of the boat... and if I lost my rudder stock it wouldn't flood the rest of the boat. I don't see why more boats aren't designed this way.


But you don't sail 15 miles off shore and in 7 foot waves....
06-05-2008 01:56 PM
sailingdog Thanks for that post Vasco.

As I said earlier in this thread, the rudder in my boat is in a compartment that is sealed off from the rest of the boat... and if I lost my rudder stock it wouldn't flood the rest of the boat. I don't see why more boats aren't designed this way.
06-05-2008 01:43 PM
Vasco From Beneteau Google Group:

All Members:

CB2 member Steve Rudiger forwarded the following message concerning
Annapolis based Beneteau 40.7 Making Waves. Although it is very
unfortunate that the vessel was lost, the story demonstrates the
importance of handling the situation calmly and without panic,
assessing the problem quickly, summoning the proper assistance, and
making realistic decisions concerning the importance of people over
things regardless of how fond we may be of them. There is a similar
story of this same thing happening to a CAL 31 in Lake Erie last year
in the June 2008 issue of SAIL. The situation was handled in much the
same way and although the vessel sunk (later to be raised and
recovered) there was no loss of life of injury.

Start of Message

Friends –

As some of you may have heard Making Waves, our Beneteau 40.7, sank 15
miles off the Long Island coast yesterday afternoon. All hands are
safe and sound.

We were in the process of delivering the boat to Newport for the start
of the Bermuda Ocean race. We were under sail in 5-7 foot seas with
about 20-25 knots of breeze (both from our stern quarter) and the boat
was sailing great, clipping double digit speeds coming off swells,
when we heard a banging noise and lost steerage. When we investigated
we discovered that the rudder tube had broken just above the hull
joint and we were taking on water. We aren’t certain whether the
rudder stock actually broke first or the tube it rides in, which in
turn broke the rudder stock. In any event, we were able to control
the flooding using our bilge pumps until the Coast Guard reached us
with a 47’ motor life boat. The CG was initially also going to
scramble a helicopter, but weather conditions scrapped that plan. A
100’+ trawler also answered our mayday and shadowed us until the Coast
Guard released them. We had also set off the EPIRB and the VHF MMSI
distress call, both of which the Coast Guard acknowledged receiving.

The Coast Guard took us in tow, but we were unable to keep the boat in
line with the tow since we had no rudder control. Seas were now 7-9
feet with an occasional 12 footer and the additional force from
veering back and forth apparently sheared the rudder post completely
and we started taking on water at a much greater rate. On top of that,
as we veered back and forth with the seas the tow line was putting
heavy pressure on the forestay, and we were afraid we might take it
out and bring the rig down. At that point we decided the prudent
course of action was to accept a ride home with the government and
they transferred the six of us to the MLB in 2 passes. That was a
pretty interesting maneuver in itself – they actually brought the MLB
right up to the leeward side of the boat in rolling seas and we walked/
jumped/vaulted across to the waiting arms of the crew – I swear they
didn’t scratch the gel coat. Water was mid-calf deep in the cabin
when the last person came out, but it took nearly an hour for the boat
to settle and sink in 165 feet of water – the CG had to hang around to
make sure the boat would not be a hazard to navigation.

We were taken to Coast Guard Station Shinnecock (near the Hamptons)
where the Guardsmen treated us warmly, feeding us and even offering us
a ride to the Islip airport where we rented a van for the drive
home. I can’t say enough about the professionalism and skill of the
Coast Guard, particularly since most of the boat crew appeared to be
barely out of high school. I am also very proud of the way our crew
handled the situation. We worked through the problems efficiently and
calmly which is why we got out of the situation with no injury or loss
of life.

Guys and gals, I’m sorry we won’t be able to do the Bermuda Race and
apologize to those who were coming to Bermuda to help us deliver
Making Waves home. We will try to find some way to make it up to
you. Anyone who had gear on board (Grant, David B., Mike, Larry,
Bob, Alan, et al.) please let me know what was there and its value and
we will submit it with our insurance claim and make you whole.

Many people have already called and e-mailed to express their concern
about our well-being and sympathy over the loss of the boat – thank
you for your thoughts. I am simply thankful that our crew is home and
safe.

Jim

End of Message

Be safe and know that there are great folks out there ready to help,
but plan for the unlikely event that something similar could happen to
you – because it could.

Mike Everitt

Vice Commodore
06-05-2008 01:28 PM
sailingdog Vasco-

Given the issues regarding the rudder, if you source the page you got the material you're cutting and pasting, it should be okay. That's generally covered by FAIR USE provisions of the 1978 Copyright act.
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