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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Sea Trial Tomorrow, Now What?
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Thread: Sea Trial Tomorrow, Now What? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
06-05-2008 02:56 AM
artbyjody
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryL View Post
T

If the surveyor finds serious problems with the boat, why would you waste your (and everyone else's) time on a sea trial?

Barry
I do them both at the same time myself as it saves me the frustration. Although I agree, I would never make a offer on a boat until I have done my own surveyor like inspection, but its his first boat and first experience doing this. Now is the time he can back out of the deal since survey is done / sea trail, counter get the price it should go for, and if not then decide if 19K is really worth it considering better maintained models are at that price...
06-04-2008 09:45 PM
BarryL
boat buying

Quote:
Originally Posted by artbyjody View Post
Go over it like you would buying a used car (or new for that matter). Get into every nook and cranny (you'll pick up things that the surveyor may not). Look for broken items, dark colored wood that indicates wood rot, check and make sure all the buttons, switches, etc work and if not labeled what they are used for etc, check all the bildge accesses, locate all the tanks and seahulls...

Take time to also chat with the owner if on board and ask questions - but more importantly ask them what they found to be weaknesses or annoyances with the boat - and what you should be aware of in terms of the boats quirks...

You'll be surprised how forth coming people are when asked directly.

Most of all - after clamoring around and soaking where things are - take a few moments to relax and consider if this is the boat you see yourself doing whatever style of sailing you intend...
This is all very good advice - but this is something you should have done long before the sea trial. IMHO, the sea trial is really just the icing on the cake. Way BEFORE you make an offer on the boat you should be crawling all over it looking to see what is wrong. Then, if it passes your test, you make the offer. Then you negotiate with the broker / owner. Then you arrange for the survey. Only after the survey has been done (at least most of it) should the sea trial occur (really, it's the last part of the survey).

If the surveyor finds serious problems with the boat, why would you waste your (and everyone else's) time on a sea trial?

Barry
06-04-2008 08:14 PM
montenido
Thanks Everybody, See New Post

Thanks, montenido
06-04-2008 03:58 PM
artbyjody Go over it like you would buying a used car (or new for that matter). Get into every nook and cranny (you'll pick up things that the surveyor may not). Look for broken items, dark colored wood that indicates wood rot, check and make sure all the buttons, switches, etc work and if not labeled what they are used for etc, check all the bildge accesses, locate all the tanks and seahulls...

Take time to also chat with the owner if on board and ask questions - but more importantly ask them what they found to be weaknesses or annoyances with the boat - and what you should be aware of in terms of the boats quirks...

You'll be surprised how forth coming people are when asked directly.

Most of all - after clamoring around and soaking where things are - take a few moments to relax and consider if this is the boat you see yourself doing whatever style of sailing you intend...
06-04-2008 03:29 PM
ratherbesailing Ask for a list of all repairs done on the boat. If they didn't keep a list/log, they didn't take care of the boat!
06-04-2008 02:48 PM
BarryL
Quote:
Originally Posted by montenido View Post
If I get the jist of this, trust the surveyor while asking lots of questions, and discount the opinions of the selling broker. Take as much time as needed, then use the findings of the survey and sea trial to negotiate the final price.
That is basically it. However, don't expect to have any major changes because of the price. On my first boat the survey didn't show anything major and the closing was a week later at the agreed on price. For my second boat the survey showed minor things (a few navigation lights didn't work, some rigging wasn't run right, etc.). I had the seller correct those problems before closing on the boat.

Barry
06-04-2008 12:16 AM
negrini Try to get there a little earlier and spend some time looking to the boat, and imagine you and beloved ones boarding and sitting around. Sea trial results has no meaning if you don't fall in love with her. Ok, don't be fooled by this, so check the fridge and make sure there is enough space for beers .... good luck !
06-04-2008 12:13 AM
jrd22 At our sea trial (my first) the surveyor also went along, and I was glad he did. We sailed upwind on both tacks, then downwind. Check steering on all points of sail, check for any looseness or "clunks". If you are fortunate to have good winds push her to the limits, that's where any weakness will show up. Under power take it up to full throttle for a full 5 minutes to check for overheating, excessive smoke or a loss of oil pressure when you go back to idle. Check all instruments for proper operation. We did the sea trial first so we could check the engine for leaks after being run hard.

good luck, John
06-03-2008 11:40 PM
montenido
Great Information, Thanks

Hi, all. Wow, what a great bunch of info to use tomorrow. If I get the jist of this, trust the surveyor while asking lots of questions, and discount the opinions of the selling broker. Take as much time as needed, then use the findings of the survey and sea trial to negotiate the final price. I am making a compilation of all the great posts here and will post the final sea trial list for further use later.

Thank you all. I will let you know how it goes.

montenido
06-03-2008 11:35 PM
BarryL
Surveyor

Hello,

IMHO, you should do whatever the surveyor asks to be done. If he's good, that will include a thorough check of the:

engine
transmission
steering
winches
furler (if there is one)
stuffing box
motor mounts
etc.

The other things people mention should be done, but don't have to be part of the sea trial.

If there is a broker you should not expect the owner to be present. It's the broker's job to do the work of selling the boat. If the broker is good, he won't let you dock the boat, or otherwise risk damaging it.

Good luck,
Barry
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