SailNet Community - Reply to Topic

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Just how important is a wind gauge?
 Not a Member? 


Thread: Just how important is a wind gauge? Reply to Thread
Title:
  

By choosing to post the reply below you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Click here to view the posting rules you are bound to when clicking the
'Submit Reply' button below


Topic Review (Newest First)
06-20-2008 12:59 AM
davidpm The charter customer was possibly just making a big deal out of it to get a discount. Might as well nothing to loose.
06-19-2008 11:26 PM
merttan I'm no pro... but I don't see the necessity of it at all... After all what you feel is what you get... If you cant feel the wind on your face, you may need one...
A wet finger is always useful for those purposes
06-19-2008 09:08 PM
therapy23
Quote:
Originally Posted by funsailthekeys View Post
I am the operations manager of a charter fleet and wanted conformation that the failure of the wind instrument was not a life and death struggle as the charterer stated. ( now if only my boss would see that) PS the boat has top of the line electronics and weather overly. (covet-covet)
I wonder why you came here for an answer, given your position.

What is your bosses title?

The charterer might be over exaggerating the need in your mind but given you said it was a cat, then to someone unfamiliar with that type of cat (a charterer for example ) and the need to reef at specific wind speeds as per the manufacturer, then the charterer may well need that info to not make a mistake in estimating the time to reef and indeed risk "life".

Is the insurance policy up to date?

worst case;
Boat is said to be OK to charter.
Charterer disagrees but follows your (professional charter business) standing on the matter.
Wind blows boat over with only one reef in place.
Someone drowns.
You lose.
06-19-2008 08:07 PM
blt2ski Did Columbus have one when he sailed the ocean blue?

Enjoy your trip

Marty
06-19-2008 07:59 PM
sgkuhner If you were going to leave to sail around the world in the trade winds, I would definitely recommend a wind speed indicator. The reason is that when sailing down wind, it is hard to judge how hard the wind is blowing. On our first circumnavigation in the early 70s, the only instrument we had was a wind speed indicator. We didn't even have a depth sounder; we used a lead line. However, that said, the wind-speed indicator was a useful tool in determining when to reef when going down wind. Other than on a broad reach or run, we would ALWAYS reef the FIRST time I thought about it. My motto was another day I have, another mast I don't have. As for the wind direction, pieces of yarn tied to the rigging will do fine.
06-19-2008 05:03 PM
chucklesR Back to the specific conditions of the OP,
My windex died as a result of a collision with a heft wind blow chunk of tree on week three of my brand new Gemini. It points from 0 to 90 degrees, now where else - wind speed was not affected.

I still haven't fixed it because I hate going aloft.

It's important only in that I can't operate my St60+ in windvane mode, otherwise every time I've checked the boat still sails just the same.
06-19-2008 04:42 PM
johnshasteen I've voyaged far and wide on Paloma and have never missed it - matter of fact, if we had a wind guage in either of the two Force 10 storms that we've weathered, we would have really been worried. In the March '08 storm, for 36 hours, we thought the winds were 40-50 and gusting a bit over - no real big deal for Paloma, the bluewater warrior princess. When we got back into port and I talked to the Coast Guard, they said, oh no, the winds were 50-60, gusting well above 60 and when you couple that with the cold front that was carrying the winds was moving 35 mile per hour - the wind effect was even higher - I thought, I was sure glad we didn't know that at the time.
06-19-2008 04:27 PM
Stillraining
Quote:
Originally Posted by weareleaving View Post
Have gone far and wide without one. If you are that faint of heart without something simple like that, you shouldn't be sailing. It's a nice thing to have, but definitely not necessary! What a butthead!
Nice first post... ...Welcome to Sailnet none the less..Good thing we dont have neg.reps anymore..or is it?
06-19-2008 03:47 PM
funsailthekeys
Yes I agree with everyone

I feel that the wind instrument is not necessary for most purposes.(my opinion here) As you are all boat owners, you are well aware that things fall out of the sky at the moat inopportune times. As I am sure you will all agree the captain is ultimately responsible to accept or deny the vessel. This has been fun with all the spirited replies, thank you all. I forgot to mention that it failed 2 days after he left and the unit was only 4 days old.
06-19-2008 03:35 PM
DrB
Yes, a charter boat is a different issue.

If I am paying to rent a boat, car, hotel room, etc., I expect everything to work. I don't expect everything to be in pristine condition, but in good working order is expected. If I had no other options to fix a damaged piece of equipment, and the items that were not working were not critical to the safety of the crew or vessel, I would make it very clear to the charteree that the items were defective before they left the dock.

DrB
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:28 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.