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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Sailboat Design and Construction > Is this gash fixable?
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Thread: Is this gash fixable? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-17-2008 10:45 AM
mikehoyt JC

Couple of other points. The advice on your crack repair is all good so I will skip that as it has been covered.

1. This boat looks like it has been sitting for quite a while. There are a lot of other projects that will probably require more time and attention than the gash. Assess those as well. Concerns such as rigging, sails and motor as those are very expensive to replace...

2. I am guessing this is your first boat other than a dingy. As it is only 22 feet, pretty open and already pretty beat up I think it is an excellent learning platform for boat repair, restoration, etc.... At 22 feet all aspects are cheaper and even if you totally trash the boat by messing up the repairs you are not much further behind than where you started - unless you get hurt as a result

My advice? Consider this a learning boat. You will learn how to do fibreglass repair, cleanup, wiring, etc... and these skills will be extremely useful when looking to purchase and maintain other boats in your future. Consider this the education boat

Mike
07-14-2008 06:24 AM
Rockter If you have already got the boat than it's certainly worth giving it a try.
I would grind away all the edges to get to base material, inside and out, and grind a fair bit either side, and let rip with a an epoxy lay-up over the damage.
With proper preparation!!! it is very strong indeed and it certainly will not leak.
Try not to over-do it on the thickness of the new lay-up or the repair will be a bit too stiff. Try to spread the stiffness as best can.

If that is the boat pictured in your profile, it looks a neat boat and looks fast. Get a jet washer on there set to "fan" pattern and you will not recognise it in a few hours. Don't get too close with the washer.... it can lift paint if too close.
07-08-2008 05:03 PM
sailingdog Good enough...let us know how it goes.
07-08-2008 04:53 PM
jcstein I know little to nothing about composites and mixing resin. But I'm a relatively smart guy and I'm not afraid to read directions and get advice.

As for the crack. Ironically the crack is smack dab in the center of the port side bench. Its under one of the portions that is covered with fiberglass, but its not on any seam of any sort.

ATM my plans are to repair the crack and strip the paint off of everything anyway. I've glanced at Brian Gilberts website about his mac22 restoration. And planned on re-enforcing the joints as part of the project.

I haven't started anything yet as I am waiting on my copies of
Fix It and Sail by Brian Gilbert
Sailboat Hull and Deck Repair by Don Casey
Don Casey's Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance Manual

to arrive.

Thanks to everyone for their comments and advice.
07-08-2008 02:31 PM
hellosailor JC-
If you haven't been there yet, go to the West (aka Gougeon) web site. They have a free newsletter/magazine they send out, and archived copies available free for download that show detailed repair procedures. A hull repair like you want to do is fairly simple. If you call them (your dime) they'll even work up a bill of materials with you and tell you the retail cost of them.

Don't just start cutting away at the damage--you may find that it only needs to be feathered in, not cut out, and by removing less you need less new material ($$) and have an easier job rebuilding the proper hull shape.

You probably will need to unbuild the interior bench, so you can rebuild the damaged area from both sides for better strength.
07-08-2008 11:22 AM
funsailthekeys
you make an excellent point dog

You are quite correct in your comment, I find mixing resins for a particular repair fairly easy and forget that not everyone has my experience in certain things. I apologize if I seemed rude in my answer. This is a great forum and I'm new to it and will work on my communication skills. For a beginner the west system can't be beat as it is all premeasured and near fool proof. I agree the adhesion of epoxy over ester resins is superior and would make a strong repair.
07-08-2008 09:06 AM
sailingdog You're basically missing the point. While you might be able to get the repair done properly using a polyester or vinylester resin, the average layperson doesn't have the skills or experience in working with polyester and vinylester resins and may not get the same results. It is far simpler and easier for an unskilled layperson to get a quality repair if they use epoxy. Having too much specialized knowledge and experience can make you give as bad advice as having none at all when speaking to the needs of the average layperson.

My guess would be that the OP doesn't have a degree in Marine Technologies and doesn't have 20 years of composite engineering experience, since they're asking for advice on an internet forum. While you may be technically correct, your biased viewpoint—due to your intimate knowledge of the materials and your vast experience—is making you less than qualified for giving advice to a neophyte boat repair person. All of the composite DIY repairs, and many of the professionally done repairs I've seen that are structural in nature were done using EPOXY resins.


Quote:
Originally Posted by funsailthekeys View Post
Actually I have a bachelors degree in Marine Technologies and am certified in several areas of fiberglass repair including cobalt fiberglass repair. So with an engineering degree in this stuff as well as using it for 20 years I 'm pretty confident it would be a one time fix. Also the West system is for people that can't measure proportions correctly. For those of you that don't know, Cobalt fiber glassing is a 4 part mixture.
07-08-2008 08:53 AM
funsailthekeys
repair issues to polyester boats

Actually I have a bachelors degree in Marine Technologies and am certified in several areas of fiberglass repair including cobalt fiberglass repair. So with an engineering degree in this stuff as well as using it for 20 years I 'm pretty confident it would be a one time fix. Also the West system is for people that can't measure proportions correctly. For those of you that don't know, Cobalt fiber glassing is a 4 part mixture.
07-07-2008 07:54 PM
7Psych I would'nt worry about it......It'll buff right out...........
07-07-2008 05:46 PM
sailingdog Polyester resin is still used by a majority of the boat builders, primarily due to cost issues. There are also some complexities to using epoxy in boat-sized projects, like the need for a curing oven to ensure proper curing of all of the epoxy resin, that have also deterred some manufacturers from moving over to epoxies.
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