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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Recommended cruising boats
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Topic Review (Newest First)
10-23-2003 02:02 PM
WHOOSH
Recommended cruising boats

H37C Skipper, Jeff and the Group:

I surely didn''t mean to (and don''t think I did) criticize the design nor the sail plan. And perhaps I''m thinking of a different model? The one I''ve watched being cruised first hand was a Cherubinni (sp?) design, built in the 70''s. Tabbing failed, the rudder post bent like wet carboard, and the prop shaft/strut similarly bent on another occasion, all from inside cruising on the ICW. There were other ''issues'' which were more cosmetic than structural but resulted from humidity (and some leaks due to lack of proper bedding) and which the crew still had to address with much disgust. Some of the working gear on the rig was hardly suitable for offshore work which, after all, one may find one has to do when trying to work to windward getting down to the Caribbean). This was a new boat, on it''s first 2-year cruising run (PEANUT BUTTER by name) altho'' I did hear similar comments from a 2nd H37C owner based in Charleston...but I never got below on the boat. Perhaps it was a lemon? Perhaps I''m being overly picky? Perhaps I''ve got a different boat in mind? And/or perhaps two data points don''t describe a full continuum.

Jack
10-23-2003 09:51 AM
h37skipper
Recommended cruising boats

Unusual for us too. We left Canada with a nice NE breeze and jib(yankee) alone. The winds built and were coming over the port quarter. You have to see 8-footers only three seconds apart to appreciate how that makes a 20000# boat roll. True, there was a better point of sail but it would have taken us way off course. Besides, not every day do you get to sail at 9 knots.
10-21-2003 11:29 AM
sailingfool
Recommended cruising boats

Skipper,

You must have a real charm to find conditions like that on a regular basis, I suspect most of us see such conditions once or twice a season. I am curious to understand the physics of constantly heeling 40 degress and surfing - our keel boat usually only heels materially sailing close to the wind, or surfs when running before the wind, but never the two together. How do you manage to combine these two behaviors, other than perhaps during a hopefully transient, spinnaker broach?

10-21-2003 09:04 AM
h37skipper
Recommended cruising boats

I would invite Jack to crew on my ''79 H37C on Lake Erie. We only, if not too crazy, sail in six to eight footers. But when you consider the wave period averages three seconds we get considerably more stress than many other bodies of water(I have sailed extensively in the Atlantic).

On a recent return from Canada in 30+ kts we were constantly at 40 degrees and surfing over 9 kts. The crew was never uncomfortable or in danger. The only structural changes to the boat are new bronze portlights. All else is original. The cutter-rig is an excellent sail plan, I often single-hand.

10-20-2003 06:03 AM
Jeff_H
Recommended cruising boats

Jack, with all due respect, I believe that you and I are talking about two different models. The Hunter that I am refering to had a partial skeg hung rudder and a beefy hull deck joint consisting of an aluminum toe rail closely bolted through the deck and a wide, thick inward facing flange. These boats appear to be pretty close in quality to the Brewer designed Morgan 38 although you might be right that the Brewer has a potentially more robust skeg hung rudder.

Respectfully,
Jeff
10-20-2003 06:03 AM
Jeff_H
Recommended cruising boats

Jack, with all due respect, I believe that you and I are talking about two different models. The Hunter that I am refering to had a partial skeg hung rudder and a beefy hull deck joint consisting of an aluminum toe rail closely bolted through the deck and a wide, thick inward facing flange. These boats appear to be pretty close in quality to the Brewer designed Morgan 38 although you might be right that the Brewer has a potentially more robust skeg hung rudder.

Respectfully,
Jeff
10-20-2003 03:57 AM
WHOOSH
Recommended cruising boats

Jeff makes a valid observation, altho'' of course the trick is to fold in all these variables (build quality, size, layout, cost, etc.) into some choices that are desireable to the person asking the question.

My reading of the original post is that a Caribbean cruise is being considered. I would be VERY reluctant to take a Hunter 37 cutter down there, only because the 37''s I''ve seen (different from the ones Jeff''s seen) are poorly constructed, suffer from bent rudder posts and bent shafts even on the ICW run, and would not enjoy the heavy windward motorsailing, while the hull/deck monocoque structure is worked over and over by the opposing swell & wind waves. Just about anything can get down there, of course, but the boats mentioned ("... Island Packet 35, the Tayana 37 and perhaps a Morgan 38") are all IMO of substantially better construction and more suitable for that kind of run without undue stress on the crew.

Jack
10-17-2003 03:57 PM
Jeff_H
Recommended cruising boats

I would suggest that you would get more useable space in a more easily handled boat, perhaps even for less money if you looked for a longer boat with the same displacement and therefore less beam. Beam buys you little in the way of useable space as compared to length. While beam makes a shorter boat feel bigger, within reason a longer narrower boat will produce a more comfortable boat in all ways. The price of beam is a real reduction in sailing ability and seaworthiness to the point that you might want to consider a trawler, at least that way you will spend less time motoring.

Respectfully,
Jeff
10-17-2003 10:57 AM
mdougan
Recommended cruising boats

You might want to have a look at the Hans Christian boats. They have a good reputation for cruising and are very well appointed below. They come in lengths of 33, 38 and maybe 42-43. I think you can find some in the 33 to 38 size in your price range. Check www.yachtworld.com
10-17-2003 07:09 AM
gregreinhard
Recommended cruising boats

The requirement of a broad beam is because the admiral demands it. Kitchen work space, live aboard, etc.
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