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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Jacklines
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Thread: Jacklines Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-27-2008 02:23 PM
allendick You'll find you instantly have superhuman strength, but not necessarily superhuman reasoning.

The second comment in post #44 was in regard falling over when not necessarily tethered, but also applies when tethered.

The first was pointing out that if the tether lets you fall over or through/under the lines -- which it should not but most do -- then getting back up may be impossible without strong assistance or a way to work your way back to a platform, ladder, or line and loop hanging over for such an eventuality.

Getting a tether by a stanchion may be a big problem or it may not, depending on the tack, waves, boatspeed, etc., however having two tethers makes it a whole lot less risky, since one can be detached and moved at a time. Of course with two tethers, the risk of going over should be much less in the first place.

Don't ask me how I know this.

Also, netting or weaving in the lifelines may look a little tacky, but it has saved many a dog, child, or adult sailor from an unscheduled swim after slipping or tripping and rolling under the lines.
08-27-2008 10:27 AM
Gashmore
Quote:
Originally Posted by allendick View Post
If over the side, climbing up can be impossible due to height or water movement, so a plan, made in advance, to get around to the stern is advisable. That needs to be considered: if the jack lines are set up to allow a person to go over, they must allow the person to get around to the relative calm astern, and hopefully a boarding ladder or platform.
Which brings up the question of how to get the tether to slide past the stantion tops.
08-26-2008 07:09 PM
allendick And if you are wearing an inflatable and hit the water, it is going to inflate, even while you are still tethered, adding drag and making getting back on deck a lot harder. Better to run the jacklines to prevent a fall outside the lifelines.

If over the side, climbing up can be impossible due to height or water movement, so a plan, made in advance, to get around to the stern is advisable. That needs to be considered: if the jack lines are set up to allow a person to go over, they must allow the person to get around to the relative calm astern, and hopefully a boarding ladder or platform.
08-26-2008 06:37 PM
Xosh Climbing webbing will be just fine if that's what you want to use. Tack on the "marine" label and pay out as arse. I used do a lot of rigging and the climbing webbing is more that sufficient to take the weight.

I've set up numerous slacklines (a tightrope of sorts made from 1" climbing webbing) on a 60' gap with a one inch piece of tubular climbing webbing threaded with another section of 3/8" webbing. The tension on the webbing was so great that in the center of 60' there was less than 2' of sag. I took numerous falls (aprox. 7'-9' drops) Shockloading the line under extreme tension. I'm still here to tell the story and if your in a chest harness taking that much force from waves, etc..you're going to get ripped in half.

Just my .2 cents

~Josh
08-26-2008 06:34 PM
sailingdog It depends on how the padeyes are mounted. If they're screwed to the fiberglass... no... if they're through-bolted with fairly large bolts (say three 1/4-20 bolts) and have a backing plate and such, yes, they probably are.
Quote:
Originally Posted by welshwind View Post
Are padeyes strong enough to serve as termination points for jacklines? The point about the aft cleats is well-taken and I have padeyes toward the centerline of the boat near the stern.
08-26-2008 06:16 PM
welshwind Are padeyes strong enough to serve as termination points for jacklines? The point about the aft cleats is well-taken and I have padeyes toward the centerline of the boat near the stern.
08-26-2008 04:30 PM
jdamens One thing that xort mentioned
The other attachment point would be the aft cleats and that puts the jacklines closer to the edge.
The cleats are probably strong enough, but you want to be sure that
if you do go over the side with a six foot tether and the tether slides aft along the jackline that your body doesn't end up anywhere near the
propeller.
08-26-2008 03:39 PM
mfbsail
2 cents...

Go with attaching your jacklines together, but make sure your carrick bend is pretty snug or what you deem useful and strong. I would always side with attaching to a cleat or horn based on breaking strength but keeping the person inboard is a must. Just think about the length of your tether and if you were to be, say 3 feet closer to the rail, you would be that much more under the boat if you were tossed overboard.

You may get impaled by the stanchion or something else but at least this way you do not get dragged to your death under the boat.

We have often debated this topic based on rescue coverage, fresh or seawater venues, etc, because the fact is that some can swim better than others and if, say your racing, and you can get aboard something in an hour and the water temp will not kill you,...I would rather take my chances in that situation vs being dragged to death. Single-handed sailing attaching is a must...as well as double-handed.
08-19-2008 11:29 AM
sailingdog Two points on that story. First, they weren't wearing a PFD, which is why they sank on the helo's first approach. Second, they weren't tethered to the boat... which is why the helo was looking for a head and arms, rather than a boat.
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagine2frolic View Post
08-19-2008 10:36 AM
imagine2frolic Sailor, knocked from boat, rescued 12 hours later - Yahoo! News

A lesson learned I hope?
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