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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Danger
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Thread: Danger Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-17-2008 11:10 AM
GaryHLucas
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
How did you do it?
It's very simple. All of these multiple dial locks have the same weakness. They are not machined accurately enough, so the cams don't share the load. If you pull hard on the shackle it will load one cam more than the rest. You can feel that one is harder to turn than the others. When that one is lined up it gets a little looser, and one of the others will get harder to turn. You then turn that one until it gets looser, and on to the rest.

I learned how to do this as a kid on a 7 hour trip to Vermont skiing. I was bored and worked on my cable lock until I could open it easily, then my sisters, dad's, and mom's lock. After that I could open them so fast you'd swear I knew the combination!

The old dial type are much harder to crack, but I have had luck with some of the cheap ones. If there is any drag it give you a hint where the cams are.
09-17-2008 10:07 AM
ckgreenman The issue isn't the key type but rather the shackle lock mechanism. Most (if not all) locks use the same type of catch and are vulnerable.
09-17-2008 08:55 AM
xort What about the round key type locks? I've been under the impression they are more difficult to pick.
09-17-2008 12:07 AM
ckgreenman I wish I knew about this before drilling out the rivets in my lift control box. I bought the lift used and it came with a combination lock. The owner couldn't remember the combo so we ended up having to drill it.
09-17-2008 12:02 AM
davidpm
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryHLucas View Post
I like those locks, I don't have to worry about losing the key! I was sitting on the back of a guy's truck a while back playing with one of those locks. I handed it to him open. He said he must of left it open. I closed it and spun the dials, then proceeded to open it again with the lock behind my back, in about 1 minute. I can do the same with nearly any brand of that style of dial lock.
How did you do it?
09-16-2008 08:58 PM
GaryHLucas
Quote:
Originally Posted by SVDistantStar View Post
I like those locks, I don't have to worry about losing the key! I was sitting on the back of a guy's truck a while back playing with one of those locks. I handed it to him open. He said he must of left it open. I closed it and spun the dials, then proceeded to open it again with the lock behind my back, in about 1 minute. I can do the same with nearly any brand of that style of dial lock.
09-09-2008 10:36 PM
ckgreenman
Quote:
Originally Posted by AboardIndigo View Post
Most anti-theft systems are to deter the casual crook from stealing your stuff (i.e. to encourage the casual crook to steal some stuff that isn't yours).
Kinda like the reason why you scuba dive with a knife AND a buddy. Especially When there's sharks around.
09-09-2008 08:45 PM
AboardIndigo Most anti-theft systems are to deter the casual crook from stealing your stuff (i.e. to encourage the casual crook to steal some stuff that isn't yours).

We have combination locks (various types) that are used by our employees. When an employee forgets the combination, I "crack" them by feeling my way through the lock to the correct combination. I haven't met a lock that I couldn't beat. Does that mean we don't use them? Nope, because they are better than having no lock at all, as long as we know what their limitations are.
09-09-2008 08:35 PM
gc1111 I have a son that went to MIT. He told me that part of freshman orientation there was a lock picking course. The justification was that they were going to learn how anyway, and now everyone knew that and could react appropriately.
09-09-2008 08:21 PM
AdamLein
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
I'm not so sure its exclusively a bad guys thing.
I totally agree. When I said, "The tricks only work because etc.," I meant that they are only useful for criminal purposes because etc.
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