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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Will my boat sink? What should I do?
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Thread: Will my boat sink? What should I do? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-23-2008 06:25 PM
sailingdog Countrybumpkin-

Maine sailing's handle here is Halekai36. He's a good egg, and one of the SN members I've met in person.
09-23-2008 03:12 PM
countrybumpkin
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalebD View Post
Since Halekai, er, mainesail has not piped up yet I will plug his web pages on the 'how to' of thru-hulls and seacocks.
See the first two links that have great pictures and explanations here: "How To" - The Boat Projects & Upgrade Blogs Photo Gallery by Maine Sailing at pbase.com

Wow! Great webpage! So much information and the pictures are fantastic!

(and it's free!)

Thanks CalebD for posting and thanks to mainsail for creating.

good stuff.......
09-22-2008 06:02 PM
J36ZT CB,

It looks like you've made an effective emergency repair. It's easy for the rest of us to be armchair sailors. As for whether to trust it or not and for how long...only you can make that call.

Your idea of inducing heel by halyard is not a new one. If I'm correct, some riggers will do this when they tune masts. And, I've heard of the halyard to an anchor trick when a boat has run aground. But, there are dangers... Several years ago, I saw the halyard to induce heel trick done to repair a thru-hull, and it worked well for the most part. The guy forgot to close the seacocks on the other side of the boat. By the time the guy had replaced the thru-hull and valve, his boat was half-filled with water. He hadn't noticed the rising waterline because the boat was heeled.

So, be careful and think things through.

Skipper, J/36 "Zero Tolerance"
09-22-2008 05:05 PM
countrybumpkin
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbondy View Post
A related question: It appears you have two hoses running from that valve. One is the raw water intake for the engine cooling system. What is the other?
The exhaust? I have to trace it.
09-22-2008 11:28 AM
runner Off topic but close enough. My father was given a fancy bass boat that had been sitting in a barn for years. We tuned it up and headed to Winter's Park to test things out. It would really move and seemed perfect for the first couple of miles. Then it seemed to start losing some power. By the time I got back in, I had all of my passengers as far forward on the bow as they could get and the fuel tank was completely under water.
All but one of the old thru hull fittings had snapped off leaviong multiple holes in the hull. Those plastic thru hull fittings age and decay sitting dry. We had to replace all of them. West Marine sells a bag full of different sized plugs just for that possible problem. Never go out very far without having a plug for every hole in the hull!
In our case, the boat was pretty much unsinkable to begin with and all I had to do was keep her level and get back to the dock. Still, when the water started coming up thru the floor drains, it was not a nice feeling!
09-22-2008 10:36 AM
jbondy A related question: It appears you have two hoses running from that valve. One is the raw water intake for the engine cooling system. What is the other? FWIW - I don't recall if it was here or one of the other forums I monitor, but there was recently significant discussion about the possible downside of sharing the engine coolant intake with anything else. The bottom line was that it wasn't considered a good idea.
09-22-2008 12:24 AM
CalebD Since Halekai, er, mainesail has not piped up yet I will plug his web pages on the 'how to' of thru-hulls and seacocks.
See the first two links that have great pictures and explanations here: "How To" - The Boat Projects & Upgrade Blogs Photo Gallery by Maine Sailing at pbase.com
09-21-2008 11:43 PM
hellosailor Bumpkin, heeling the boat over with a line form your masthead to another slip or such is a perfectly traditional way to get a fitting above the waterline.

Beeswax makes a fairly good temporary plug, and it is easy to "chew" and wipe back out of the fitting afterwards. But I was thinking more of using it as a backup for your epoxy repair, than as a primary plug while you were spinning fittings off.

The plugs are usually available in a poly-bagged four pack from all the boat supply stores, of course at least two of them will fit nothing on your boat "one size fits all" haha. They're usually "NAFTA" packaged for the US/Canadian market, so the French side calls them "tampons", apparently that's simply French for "plug".

At first i couldn't figure out the pcitures you posted, then I realize the u-bolt and grey glob are the PATCH, not normal equipment. Ideally the shut-off valve should be as close to the hull as possible, so there's less chance of someone standing on it, or something banging past it, and shearing it off. I'm not sure what all that plumbing there is doing--but anything you can also so to reduce it and make it less vulnerable, counts.

Of course whatever parts you need, from a reputable source, in the right material, will only be stocked in the wrong thread size or special ordered from a craftsman in the far north of Finland. that's just the way marine plumbing goes--be prepared to make multiple trips, multiple measurements, and wait a week, twice.

All good reason to "do it right the first time" !
09-21-2008 10:09 PM
Valiente ...proper BRONZE ball valves...

Brass is 1/8th the price, sure, but it's not for below the waterline and won't fit the proper through-hull threads anyway.
09-21-2008 07:39 PM
CS271409 Hi Bumpkin,
Others may condemn this idea but I think you have afforded an excellent repair and I would think it would do you until you need to haul out for the winter. When I bought my boat, the galley sink drain through hull had cracked on the "dry" side of the old original gate valve and it was held together with the handyman's friend Duct Tape. Yikes. I cut the through hull and the valve out with a hacksaw and replaced both before I put it back in the water at my marina. I have since replaced all of my through hulls from the orignal equiment (in 1978) gate valves to proper ball valve seacocks. Heeling the boat at the slip is an ingenious idea but I think your chances of sinking are very low and I would enjoy the rest of the season and do the work when it is easy to get at both the inside and outside of the hull. I would suggest changing the through hull along with the valve to ensure a proper thread match. The through hull is inexpensive compared to the valve.
If it was my boat, I would leave it as is until haulout.

Dave S
CS27
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