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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > J-Boat 41
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-16-2010 11:29 AM
CBinRI
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
The J-36 was the third design that J-boats produced after the J-24 and J-30. It was a fractionally rigged design that was not rule based but which was set up like the ocean racers of that day in terms of interior layout and deck plan. They are very good boats for that era but are a bit spartan down below.

J-boat eventially cut down the hull mold for the J-30 and used the weight savings to add a heavier, more efficient keel and an optional masthead rig to produce the J-29. That treatment was so successful that J-boats cut down the hull mold for the J-36 and went to a simplified deck plan, a deeper/ heavier keel, tiller steering and a masthead rig version that became the J-35. The J-35 is a very versitile design offer good performance in a wide range of conditions. Later J-35''s were offered with an optional pretty full interior but of course minimal headroom and cruising gear.

J-35''s are still competitive race boats typically rating somewhere around 72 and still with active one design fleets in much of the country. The J-35 is generally considered 9 to 12 seconds a mile slower, especially in a lighter air venue like Long Island Sound. The J-36 is actually an easier boat to handle and certainly the easier of the two to single-hand assuming that the deck layout has been modified.

Three reasonable alternatives to these boats would be the Express 37, Frers 36 (F3) and the Farr 11.6, each with their own advantages and disadvantages.

Jeff
I don't even have a fraction of Jeff's knowledge on these subjects but I would definitely factor into your analysis that the J-35 is a MUCH more popular boat than the J-36, is still a popular one-design class and likely will be much easier to sell if you ever decide to move on.

Edit: Erps. Just noticed the age of the thread. Oh well, maybe he's still looking at them.
04-15-2010 08:17 PM
JohnRPollard
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimsCAL View Post
This is a six year old thread guys.
That it is, that it is.

For my part, I was replying to Jose, who popped in more recently with some new questions about the J-41.
04-15-2010 07:59 PM
JimsCAL This is a six year old thread guys.
04-14-2010 01:14 PM
SW329xl I would add that you should get a clear picture in mind of what kind of sailing you really want to be doing. If you want to daysail, especially shorthanded, then you should look at a smaller boat. The bigger the boat the more it costs to operate, the more effort is required for even short daysails, with the result being that you will use it a lot less. If you are thinking about living aboard, that brings up a whole other set of issues, but chances are you would be doing little daysailing at that point too.

When you see a boat like a J41 advertised for what seems like peanuts, it can look like a winning lottery ticket someone dropped on the ground. I promise you that is only an illusion. There is a reason why the boat is that price, and it is because it has a very narrow range of uses, and costs a ton of money to run.
04-14-2010 12:44 PM
puddinlegs
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
The J-36 was the third design that J-boats produced after the J-24 and J-30. It was a fractionally rigged design that was not rule based but which was set up like the ocean racers of that day in terms of interior layout and deck plan. They are very good boats for that era but are a bit spartan down below.

J-boat eventially cut down the hull mold for the J-30 and used the weight savings to add a heavier, more efficient keel and an optional masthead rig to produce the J-29. That treatment was so successful that J-boats cut down the hull mold for the J-36 and went to a simplified deck plan, a deeper/ heavier keel, tiller steering and a masthead rig version that became the J-35. The J-35 is a very versitile design offer good performance in a wide range of conditions. Later J-35''s were offered with an optional pretty full interior but of course minimal headroom and cruising gear.

J-35''s are still competitive race boats typically rating somewhere around 72 and still with active one design fleets in much of the country. The J-35 is generally considered 9 to 12 seconds a mile slower, especially in a lighter air venue like Long Island Sound. The J-36 is actually an easier boat to handle and certainly the easier of the two to single-hand assuming that the deck layout has been modified.

Three reasonable alternatives to these boats would be the Express 37, Frers 36 (F3) and the Farr 11.6, each with their own advantages and disadvantages.

Jeff
Great stuff Jeff. To the OP, if you're going to do some racing, it's all about a boat's ability to sail near it's rating and the cost involved to make it do so. As Jeff mentions, and it can never be repeated enough, before you buy any boat, talk to several people to get an idea of the actual cost of running the boat that's caught your eye. A quick call and a couple of ball park estimates from a sailmaker is one of the first things that will reduce your dreams by about 5' LOA (if not more) in a heartbeat!
04-14-2010 08:54 AM
JohnRPollard
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josehoya View Post
Jeff-
If gotten cheaply could this J 41 be turned into a comfortable live aboard? and single handed or double handed safely around the chesapeake and eventually the BVI's? Without breaking the bank to convert things?

I'm dreaming of being a liveaboard. It seems that if I am going to buy anything, I'm going to have to do it without much help from the banks. They need it to be a newer boat which means more expensive boat or smaller boat. I'd like something like a 36 or 38' Catalina, but to gather that much in cash would take me a while. So the idea is to get a deal on a boat that I could make into something just right for myself over time.
Thanks,
Jose
Jose,

I don't think the J-41 would be a good choice for what you plan to do with this boat. While you may be able to pick one up inexpensively, it would be a very poor choice for short-handed cruising and living aboard. So many modifications would need to be made that it would prove a false economy. And even then it would not be well suited compared to many other boats conceived for your purposes from the outset.

Based on the little info you've provided, it really sounds like price of admission is a driving factor. If so, you might be wise to modify your search and look at smaller boats. The refit and on-going maintenance of a 41 footer, will be something like twice the cost of a mid-30 footer.

So you might save a lot over time by scaling back your size requirement, and paying a bit more for a well-suited design in decent condition. Fortunately, you don't necessarily have to compromise on comfort. There are many mid-30 footers that will always be more comfortable and better suited to your purposes than even a heavily modified J-41.
04-14-2010 06:35 AM
sailingdog I think Jeff already answered this when he said:

Quote:
Boats like these took a lot of skill to sail, and more skill to sail well. They are tender and easily overpowered. Their rigs were fragile and needed careful playing of the checkstays to keep in column. I had looked at one that was very cheaply priced but ultimately ruled it out as being unsuitable for adaptation to a single-hander and concluded that the J-41 requiring too many people to even go out daysailing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josehoya View Post
Jeff-
If gotten cheaply could this J 41 be turned into a comfortable live aboard? and single handed or double handed safely around the chesapeake and eventually the BVI's? Without breaking the bank to convert things?

I'm dreaming of being a liveaboard. It seems that if I am going to buy anything, I'm going to have to do it without much help from the banks. They need it to be a newer boat which means more expensive boat or smaller boat. I'd like something like a 36 or 38' Catalina, but to gather that much in cash would take me a while. So the idea is to get a deal on a boat that I could make into something just right for myself over time.
Thanks,
Jose
04-14-2010 12:28 AM
Josehoya
J 41 continued

Jeff-
If gotten cheaply could this J 41 be turned into a comfortable live aboard? and single handed or double handed safely around the chesapeake and eventually the BVI's? Without breaking the bank to convert things?

I'm dreaming of being a liveaboard. It seems that if I am going to buy anything, I'm going to have to do it without much help from the banks. They need it to be a newer boat which means more expensive boat or smaller boat. I'd like something like a 36 or 38' Catalina, but to gather that much in cash would take me a while. So the idea is to get a deal on a boat that I could make into something just right for myself over time.
Thanks,
Jose
03-17-2004 02:27 AM
smartselos
J-Boat 41

Thanks Jeff for all the great information you have provided me with!
03-10-2004 06:15 PM
Jeff_H
J-Boat 41

The J-36 was the third design that J-boats produced after the J-24 and J-30. It was a fractionally rigged design that was not rule based but which was set up like the ocean racers of that day in terms of interior layout and deck plan. They are very good boats for that era but are a bit spartan down below.

J-boat eventially cut down the hull mold for the J-30 and used the weight savings to add a heavier, more efficient keel and an optional masthead rig to produce the J-29. That treatment was so successful that J-boats cut down the hull mold for the J-36 and went to a simplified deck plan, a deeper/ heavier keel, tiller steering and a masthead rig version that became the J-35. The J-35 is a very versitile design offer good performance in a wide range of conditions. Later J-35''s were offered with an optional pretty full interior but of course minimal headroom and cruising gear.

J-35''s are still competitive race boats typically rating somewhere around 72 and still with active one design fleets in much of the country. The J-35 is generally considered 9 to 12 seconds a mile slower, especially in a lighter air venue like Long Island Sound. The J-36 is actually an easier boat to handle and certainly the easier of the two to single-hand assuming that the deck layout has been modified.

Three reasonable alternatives to these boats would be the Express 37, Frers 36 (F3) and the Farr 11.6, each with their own advantages and disadvantages.

Jeff
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