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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Gate valves and why we don't use them...
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Thread: Gate valves and why we don't use them... Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-12-2008 10:55 PM
jlprice I don't think it has anything holding them in place. I was hoping for an easier fix - I've got enough to do this winter.

Thanks for the help though.
11-12-2008 09:39 PM
sailingdog JLprice-

Is the through hull bolted or screwed to the backing plate??? If not, then yes, you'll probably spin the sucker when you're removing the valve.
11-12-2008 09:31 PM
jlprice I've been following this with some interest. We bought a 1975 38' C&C in July and none of the gate valves work and the surveyor recommended they be replaced with ball valves. Its in the cradle now and I plan to replace the gate valves with ball valves. Can I remove the valve from the through-hull and put on a ball valve or is it pretty well guarenteed that the through-hull is going to spin and I'll need to remove it and rebed it? If that's the case, then, is a flanged valve better?
11-12-2008 02:51 PM
sailaway21 sailboy,
You might try your local well-drilling supply house. 1-1/4" is a very commonly used pipe size in the water well industry. He may have only forged brass valves on hand but can get either bronze or stainless easy enough. Many of them sell products from these guys who you can see make all three types of ball valves, and yet others. Legend Valve

You might also consult Grainger, although you'll need a commercial account to order from them, if there's one in your area. Here's a list of a few of their bronze ball valves. http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg...eMatches.shtml
11-12-2008 07:38 AM
Maine Sail
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailboy21 View Post
Sounds like a plan Maine. I'll take every tool, material, & part possible to handle anything... Even the splash zone. The boat will start to settle at 11.5' and the thru-hull will expose at around 10' Start working then... I'll have 4 cycles to get it fixed before I will have to get off the grid or stay there for another month! Fun fun fun... BTW I had to get the darn thing Fedexed overnight because the big local marine store is shut down for inventory and no one else had a 1.25" freaking bronze ball valve. Gotta love Alaska. If I'm not too rushed I'll try to take some pictures so you can add a "What to do (or not to do) if you are a pathological procrastinator" section to your thruhull website..
Unfortunately 1.25" is a size that many don't stock. I'm lucky enough to be 10 minutes from Hamilton Marine, who does, but the local WM or Boaters World "fahghet about it"!!
11-11-2008 09:46 PM
sailboy21 Sounds like a plan Maine. I'll take every tool, material, & part possible to handle anything... Even the splash zone. The boat will start to settle at 11.5' and the thru-hull will expose at around 10' Start working then... I'll have 4 cycles to get it fixed before I will have to get off the grid or stay there for another month! Fun fun fun... BTW I had to get the darn thing Fedexed overnight because the big local marine store is shut down for inventory and no one else had a 1.25" freaking bronze ball valve. Gotta love Alaska. If I'm not too rushed I'll try to take some pictures so you can add a "What to do (or not to do) if you are a pathological procrastinator" section to your thruhull website..
11-11-2008 09:37 PM
Maine Sail
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailboy21 View Post
Sorry MaineSail. I remember that thread but I keep getting mixed up by BoatLife's advertising. It is a good thing you actually spoke to them otherwise I might have taken their product descriptions too literally



and..
I think both will cure but I'd be more comfortable with a product like 4200 Fast Cure than a slower curing polysulfide given the water and air temps and I generally don't like polyurethanes but I think this is one application that supports a fast cure product.

What I would do is get your boat ready for the tide cycle and tied in place on a dropping tide. At this point, and after plugging it from the outside, remove the gate valve. If you don't break the original seal on the thru-hull doing this yee hah! If it works you still have enough tide to bring her back to your slip and call it a day and if it does leak you're ready for the tide. Even if you break the seal of the thru-hull it will most likely be a drip, drip leak not a gushing river. So you can wait for the tide and be redy to go the minute it drops below the level of the through hull. Fly fishing waders work well to give you more working time. I used to careen my lobster boats when I was younger so I know the drill..
11-11-2008 08:29 PM
sailboy21 Sorry MaineSail. I remember that thread but I keep getting mixed up by BoatLife's advertising. It is a good thing you actually spoke to them otherwise I might have taken their product descriptions too literally

Quote:
Can be applied underwater for emergency repairs. Can be applied to damp surfaces.
and..
Quote:
CURE: Since Life-Calk sealant is a moisture/temperature cure and requires the absorption of moisture from the surrounding atmosphere, an increase in the relative humidity or submersion in water will result in a shorter tack free time and faster cure.
11-11-2008 02:58 PM
sailaway21 To be the safest, I'd take the rubber hose off and plug that elbo. Then I'd cut a plug to knock into the mushroom thru-hull from the exterior making sure that it does not reach the gate valve inside. Winterize your system and address the thru-hull and new valve at spring haul-out.
11-11-2008 01:41 PM
Maine Sail
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailboy21 View Post

Would life-caulk cure in time? It looks like I am going to be on the grid for about 12 hours. The next high tide isn't high enough to float off. Weather looks like chance of rain. Highs 45 low of 36 Shorepower is available so I could use a space heater if necessary at least inside the hull.
We answered this question last year in another post you made about tide grid & changing of seacocks.

Here's what I wrote last time after calling both 3M and Boat Life..


I called both 3M and BoatLife and spoke with tech support about cure times & launching. I did this because neither site really specifies launch time's or windows before launch and I would like to add this info to my article. Here's what I was told by each..

BoatLife: When I spoke with boat life they very clearly stated to me that a full cure of between five to seven days with Life Caulk is what they recommend before a launch. The tech support guy would not budge on this point even when I told him 3M 4200 and 5200 will finish curing under water. I could not get him to budge on this and he said tack and cure are two different things and cure times are very dependent on ambient temperature. He also stated that the air & hull temp can't drop below 40 degrees during the cure process and must be perfectly clean before application.

3M: I spoke with Tom about 4200, 5200 and 101. He advised against 101 due to it's very long cure time in a short window situation or regular 5200.

As for 3M 4200 & 5200 Fast Cure he stated that while they will still cure under water they don't advise running the boat, as in water movement over the hull, until cure has been completed because it can erode any sort of fillet or seal thus causing a leak and possibly moisture entrapment. I think a slow motor to your dock would not hurt as he was mostly referencing power boat failures.

3M also stated that a 40 degree minimum of both hull and air temp should be adhered to and that the lower the temperature the longer the cure time. The hull must also be bone dry & free and clear of any paint, dirt or oil when you are applying it.

3M's official policy on underwater use is to let them fully cure but this guy was being quite honest. He did say they have seen failures on quick launches that's why he advised NOT moving the boat after launch (no water flow across the hull).

Again, 3M's OFFICIAL LEGAL STATEMENT POLICY IS TO LET IT FULLY CURE BEFORE LAUNCH. I say this because I don't want people running around saying 3M told me it's perfectly OK to launch in one hour even though it probably is if you're smart about it....
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