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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > two person monohull, how big?
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Thread: two person monohull, how big? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-18-2008 11:51 AM
Boasun Safety is a state of mind! Your most important safety equipment is your brain. Knowing and being aware of the dangers around you and being prepared & equiped to handle them. Otherwise don't worry because that is just added stress you don't need.
11-18-2008 10:07 AM
yellowwducky Nope, not JUST worried about safety. Just think its prudent to be informed and doing the right thing. Informed to me means weighing the pros and cons of different setups and then going with what works best for my situation/preferences. Do I think a keel will fall off on me, nope. Do I think I will flip a catamaran, nope. But I want to weigh all the pros and cons of any design I go out on.
11-18-2008 07:57 AM
AllThumbs I guess my point is if your just worried about safety, boating may not be for you. I have nothing against being as safe as you can, but worrying about the keel falling off....well, I could worry about my wheel falling off the car, but I don't. I just maintain my car and drive it. Wheels falling off cars is probably much more common than keels falling off sailboats.

Eric
11-18-2008 07:50 AM
yellowwducky Mmmm, yea, fly, I would prefer to pass there. Give me the open road at a minimum. The open ocean sounds even nicer - none of these annoying people wanting to wand my privates and scan my shoes!
11-18-2008 07:31 AM
sailingdog Yes, and it has its own hazards, like dealing with the TSA, deep vein thrombosis, etc... and the stale recycled air really sucks compared to the fresh sea air.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idiens View Post
Oh yes! Statistically the safest place in the world, but after a while, one of the most boring.
11-18-2008 06:42 AM
Idiens
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllThumbs View Post
I would fly to your destination....safer.
Oh yes! Statistically the safest place in the world, but after a while, one of the most boring.
11-18-2008 06:35 AM
AllThumbs
Quote:
less time on a passage can only mean less potential exposure to something nasty developing while on your way.
I would fly to your destination....safer.
11-18-2008 12:04 AM
yellowwducky Interesting points!

sailingdog, that is indeed a good one about MOB - with a cat you are likely going a bit faster so your MOB is likely to be farther away. Heck, short handed with one person asleep and getting notified by a waterproof walky-talky they would be a good ways back and in the dark! Fortunately, you have to be a LOT less likely to fall off a Cat I would think.

I do wonder if its easier than thought to flip over a Cat - take a big wave a bit too sideways with a gust of wind at the right moment?

Yep, keels falling off (or getting knocked off) would defintely be a concern - especially since they are so much deeper than pretty much anything on a cat. The Etaps use 2 short ones mind you which would mitigate this - not sure how common that is though.

I agree, you can't give up seaworthiness for speed but its good everyone seems to agree that less time on a passage can only mean less potential exposure to something nasty developing while on your way. To me, this seems a big safety factor.

Now fire, Idiens, that doesn't initially spring to mind seeing as how you are surrounded by water, sinking comes to mind first! Yea, definitely something to pay attention to, especially with a couple hundred liters of diesel onboard! I would definitely be thinking a fire extinguisher in each hull of appropriate size is a necessity as well as one on deck. Should be a very manageable risk. I don't have a President by the way, I am a Canuck eh?! If we have a navy, no one told me about it.

Can you get a bow thruster for a cat - never seen that as an option. I would think it could be challenging with wind and current as mentioned.

I am wondering if you are familiar with the term 'jumping the shark' or 'nuking the fridge' Idiens? I like your idea for righting a cat with a life raft. It seems nigh on impossible short of a lot of luck to me but I like the thinking. I sort of envision the downside though of flooding the forward compartments a tad too much and sending the cat to the bottom...doh!

I am going to buy the Chris White book to see what he has to say about Cats out of curiousity - its cheap so why not. Plus thus far the 'best' design for sailing to me still looks to be the Atlantic with a central cockpit forward and a proper pilot house. I grant you I have never been on a cruising cat but the logic of this design seems very good to me at least.

Found the nauticat website - seem nice....definitely lumpy prices though considering they are 'only' a monohull.
11-17-2008 09:24 PM
sailingdog Soul-

It really depends on the specific boat design. The larger cruising catamarans can take a fair amount of supplies. The smaller cruising multis are pretty weight sensitive.
11-17-2008 08:02 PM
soulesailor What about the weight of what you want to bring along? A monohull is fairly safe to freight, especially if the heaviest items are stowed carefully in the central area and down low. Multihulls are typically dependent on being light and freighting them with cruising stores is much trickier.

Maybe SD has some real data on this?
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