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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > $1800 head
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Topic Review (Newest First)
09-04-2004 10:06 PM
waltward
$1800 head


I guess it was about 1970, I took my father inlaw sailing on a Pearson Ensign, he had never been on a sail boat before. By that time the ole prostate was not helping him very much. After being out for awhile, he said he had to go. I said "Use that bucket". He picked up the bucket, turned his back to myself and his two grand sons, and did his thing. He then turned around with the bucket in hand and asked, "What do I do with it now"? I said, "Throw it over-board", a bad choice of words. The old man stood there a few seconds looking at the bucket with a puzzzled look on his face, then shrugged his shoulders, and threw the bucket in the lake. It was however, a good man overboard drill, I got the bucket before it went down.

Now the important part. We all want to rinse the bucket after use, so we have a length of line tied to the bucket handle for dipping water over the rail. Be sure to throw the bucket forward, and pull it up and out of the water before you pass it. At six or seven knots a bucket can dislocate your shoulder or pull you overboard. I know. After all the years and all the time on sail boats, six years ago I was going down Lake Huron on a 50 ft. race boat and I made that mistake. We were moving at some where around seven or eight knots, in a fresh breeze, when the bucket got behind me, I almost went over. Closer to it than I ever want to be again. A stanchion saved me, I was able to get my feet braced and get the bucket back aboard, but I thought for a while that the shoulder was gone. It took all I had to get it done. I would suggest carrying more than one bucket, if you get in that position, LET IT GO.

Walt Ward
09-04-2004 12:09 PM
starcresttoo
$1800 head

you dont even need that.I croosed the ocean on a 100 foot half finnished schooner.there were 9 people on board.Imagine 9 people all using the same bucket.
09-04-2004 10:24 AM
wgwl13736
$1800 head

great advice! thanks, guys. it never even crossed my mind that i could live aboard long-term with only a porta-potty
08-28-2004 04:56 AM
pirateofcapeann
$1800 head

I vote for the Port-O-Potty. Thirteen years I''ve had one now and lived aboard for seven of those. No through-hulls to leak, no excessive tankage to find a location for, a lot less spare parts to carry around and a simple enough operation that even an idiot can figure it out.

With its siphon-brakes, joker valves and three-way valves, the Marine Toilet is a wonder of the plumbing world. As such, its intricate workings are easily foiled by the ingestion of implements that it can’t handle. Many people are accustomed to tossing “stuff” in their shore-based facility, and they usually don’t think to change their habits when afloat. This has been the cause for many accidents resulting in anything from the need to spend two hours, hunkered over the thing, braking it down and clearing everything out of it to actually causing the boat to sink! You decide which is worse.

For all of its fragile demeanor, it is my opinion that the patent “marine” toilet has no place aboard a boat! K.I.S.S. Go with a Port-O-Potty. Around a hundred bucks for the best model on the market!
08-27-2004 07:02 AM
maestro
$1800 head

18 gal. holding tank _ $150
Grocco Head _ $175 (you can get a cheaper one)
hoses / clamps - $75
thru-hull _$25
6 pack of favorite beer - $8
your own labor - Free

ALL UNDER $500
08-26-2004 10:36 AM
e-27 sailor
$1800 head

And here''s another thought. How offen do you think you''ll use your new head? I''ve owned a 27'' boat with a porta poti for a couple years now, and it''s never been used. If you''re a day sailor, you''ll probably only be on the water for a few hours at a time-maybe half a day, and depending on where you sail, there are usually plenty of fuel docks you can stop at, for the price of a soda.
08-25-2004 08:02 AM
Irwin32
$1800 head

One more idea. when I installed mine, I did a lot of work once the baot was in the water, so I was not able to put a thru hull in. I simply washed the bowl with a glass of water each time. That has worked well and I did not put a thru hull in over last winter''s storage.
08-16-2004 08:55 AM
wgwl13736
$1800 head

thanks capttb for all that info.how did you know what my next two questions would be?thanks again.frank
08-15-2004 10:12 AM
capttb
$1800 head

The dockside pump-out is a vacuum pump Frank, you do need to see that it seals fairly well in the fitting on your deck, the nozzle is usually a tapered rubber thing that seals pretty good.
Also, remove that cap at your dock first and be prepared to chisel it out and replace, they are often corroded (sp?) in place.
Thru hulls for flush water and macerator pump closed so you don''t suck seawater up thru tank from bottom.
Most boats have a "macerator" pump at the tank so you can pump the tank out into the ocean beyond the 3 mile limit, the pump grinds everything to size required. Some boats will have y-valve so waste can be directed to tank or direct to ocean. In some areas these must be fixed to direct to tank for environmental reasons.
08-13-2004 07:42 AM
wgwl13736
$1800 head

guys,you are AWESOME!!! thanks for taking the time to answer silly questions from a green beginner,and i have another silly one.does the dockside pumpout station have its own pump or do i need to install one after the holding tank?thanks,frank
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