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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Rozinante Project
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Thread: Rozinante Project Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-15-2009 04:12 PM
Valiente If it's a solid glass coach house and it's in good shape, I would keep it, if only because of its strength and for the access to backing plates, etc.

If this is just for "looks", consider it just as you would a false or dropped ceiling. You could even glue battens onto the roughened surface, and screw countersunk screws into those.
02-15-2009 10:30 AM
glassrozinante Maybe I'll just cut off the overhead and build a new wood one from scratch. Probably less work, less glue in the eye and would likely end up being lighter weight.
02-15-2009 02:32 AM
Valiente May I suggest an alternative? 1/4" is heavy and glassing it in is heavier. Perhaps if you glassed in "bolt receivers" every foot or so that allowed a half-inch standoff. Glue in closed-cell foam, and then glue and screw veneer or battens over that. Make channels for wiring as needed...a little planning and a couple of "dummy runs" will allow for new mast gear, lighting, etc.

This might make a lot more sense than 1/4" panels, and the foam will make it quieter and cooler down below.
02-15-2009 12:10 AM
glassrozinante Thank you greatly for your advice. I will take your thoughts into consideration as I work through this project, I will post photos of my progress and will surely have more questions as the journey evolves. I may reconsider the bead board overhead previously mentioned and might instead do some more sanding and just paint it and glue up some orford cedar beams.
02-14-2009 08:52 PM
Sailormann
Quote:
Hello Everyone, I am in the process of gutting and rebuilding the interior of a 1966, fiberglass, Cheoy Lee built, Herreshoff Rozinante.
Very nice design and hats off to you for preserving one.
Quote:
I am attaching a picture to show the current condition down below. I would like to hear of any advice, tips or criticism of my plans. So far I have gutted and ground off 90% of the old paint and have knocked down some ugly fiberglass lumps. I plan to use a lot of wood to give the feel of a wooden boat. I am thinking of paneling the overhead with .25 inch beadboard that will be glued in place with epoxy puddy. I chose this option because of how uneven the glass surface is and that it would appear like planks running fore and aft. I will then run perpendicular beams to add support and again to appear like a wooden craft.
As Jeff mentioned - avoid adding any weight at all that doesn't have to be there, and in particular, any weight that is above the waterline (it will adversely affect the boat's performance and seaworthiness).

Generally it is a bad idea to glue wooden sheets directly on to a fibreglass hull. First - it is almost impossible to get a perfect seal when you do this. There will be voids between the wood and the fibreglass. Condensation will form in there and the wood will rot. You may not see it for years but it will be occurring. Secondly, the wood and the fibrglass expand and contract at different rates and in different directions. The wood will constantly be trying to work its way off the fibreglass.

The method that seems to be the most successful is to run stringers of wood laterally on the interior of the hull (perpendicular to the waterline), and then to affix ceiling strips (which is the term used for the slats of wood which line a boat) longitudinally. When you attach the stringers to the boat, don't glue them directly to the hull but rather run a thin strip of airex core or similar material between the stringer and the hull and then attach the stringer using fibreglass tabs on the sides and top of the stringer. This avoids "hard spots" to a large extent and allows for some flexure of the hull when the boat sails.
Quote:
The area where the windows are will be wood, possibly a veneer, which will also be epoxied in place.
This is called the cabin trunk. The veneer should be a workable approach if your interior surface is beautifully smooth. If not, then consider using the ceiling approach as detailed above with solid wooden "gasketing" around the portholes.
Quote:
The rest of the ceiling area will be painted white with a one part polyurethane.
This should work but think about insulation.
Quote:
We have a Sardine woodstove on order from the San Juan Islands that should be arriving in a couple months, which will be taken into consideration when designing the cabinets on the aft, starboard side of the cabin. A seat will fit into the aft, port side of the cabin that will be at a perfect angle to sit and smoke a pipe or look over charts.
Sounds cosy. Remember to think about weight distribution so that your boat is not appreciably heavier on one side than the other.
Quote:
Most of our plans have been inspired by LFH himself right down to the cedar bucket / head, which we recently acquired.
Real purists eh !
Quote:
What recommendations do any of you have for materials for building the cabinets and seat framing, as well as the veneer for the window area (By the way, what is the proper term for that location?)? On the cabinets, I am thinking of marine plywood, possibly beadboard centers on the door and drawers and some sort of fancy wood for the trim work. I realize teak is desirable for the trim, but would like to use a more sustainably and locally (this continent) harvested wood. I also plan to build a sliding hatch cover. Please contact me with your ideas, etc. Much thanks.
Teak is nice wood, but mahogany, oak, any hardwood can work well on an interior. Give a lot of thought to ventilation. Using cane for the center panels of doors and -if possible-drawers goes a long way to cutting down on mold and mildew. Marine plywood is wonderful stuff and you should be able to construct just about everything from it, relying on the veneers for finishing. Good luck with your project ! It is nice to see people maintaining classics and I hope that you post photos of your progress here.
02-14-2009 07:44 PM
Jeff_H I really love these boats. Always have.....The Rozinante's are one of my favorite L.F. Herreshoff designs. The sail remarkably well for their era and wetted surface.

Unfortunately, the Choey Lee fiberglass versions were not the best renditions of these boats. The secret to the sailing ability and seaworthiness of the wooden Rozinante's was that they were remarkably light in weight and fairly heavily ballasted. Their light weight came from their light weight planking (typically cedar on white oak) and minimalist interiors.

The fiberglass hulls and decks on the Choey Lee versions were much heavier than the wooden versions and so were their interiors much heavier. Therefore the Cheoy Lee's used much lighter ballasting so that the boats would float on thier lines but where also a lot more tender. Some of the later Cheoy Lee Roz's even had concrete and steel ballasting aggrevating the problem with this low density ballasting. Even with the reduced weight ballasting the glass boats sat pretty deep in the water compared to the wooden ones.

My point is that whatever you do on this boat, keep it as light as you know how. Adding a wooden overhead, cabin sides, and the like, while very attractive may be a poor solution. Try to use woods like port orford or western red cedar for the interior since these are light weight species. Avoid using large quanties of epoxy putty as the weight adds up quickly. Try to keep the weight low as the Cheoy Lee boats have a very high vertical center of gravity compared to the wooden ones.

In other words think carefully about where you put weight and how much weight you add back into the boat, and you will end up with a wonderful boat all around. Add weight carelessly and you may end up with a nice looking boat that sails miserably and is dangerous in heavy going.

Respectfully,
Jeff
02-14-2009 04:00 PM
glassrozinante
Rozinante Project

Hello Everyone, I am in the process of gutting and rebuilding the interior of a 1966, fiberglass, Cheoy Lee built, Herreshoff Rozinante. I am attaching a picture to show the current condition down below. I would like to hear of any advice, tips or criticism of my plans. So far I have gutted and ground off 90% of the old paint and have knocked down some ugly fiberglass lumps. I plan to use a lot of wood to give the feel of a wooden boat. I am thinking of paneling the overhead with .25 inch beadboard that will be glued in place with epoxy puddy. I chose this option because of how uneven the glass surface is and that it would appear like planks running fore and aft. I will then run perpendicular beams to add support and again to appear like a wooden craft. The area where the windows are will be wood, possibly a veneer, which will also be epoxied in place. The rest of the ceiling area will be painted white with a one part polyurethane. We have a Sardine woodstove on order from the San Juan Islands that should be arriving in a couple months, which will be taken into consideration when designing the cabinets on the aft, starboard side of the cabin. A seat will fit into the aft, port side of the cabin that will be at a perfect angle to sit and smoke a pipe or look over charts. Most of our plans have been inspired by LFH himself right down to the cedar bucket / head, which we recently acquired. What recommendations do any of you have for materials for building the cabinets and seat framing, as well as the veneer for the window area (By the way, what is the proper term for that location?)? On the cabinets, I am thinking of marine plywood, possibly beadboard centers on the door and drawers and some sort of fancy wood for the trim work. I realize teak is desirable for the trim, but would like to use a more sustainably and locally (this continent) harvested wood. I also plan to build a sliding hatch cover. Please contact me with your ideas, etc. Much thanks. -Bryan

 
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