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Go Back   SailNet Community > Out There > Cruising & Liveaboard Forum > Production Boats and the Limits
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Thread: Production Boats and the Limits Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
3 Days Ago 10:48 PM
Faster
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

The Ortiz' blog is pretty bare bones, no info on the boat at all.. or their preparation. Agree with Jon that if it's an S&S design it was not likely built, or finished, by any of their usual clients. The fact that the deck was peeling back off the stem is a pretty major engineering (or deferred maintenance) faux pas!!
3 Days Ago 10:26 PM
smackdaddy
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Big thunderstorm moving through. Found a few leaks and just saw 52 knots. Glad I'm in the slip!

(PS - My bimini didn't blow off and I didn't sink BTW.)
3 Days Ago 10:24 PM
smackdaddy
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Hey take it up with Sparkman - or Stephens. I'm just reporting the facts baby.

They definitely would have been better off in a Hunter.
3 Days Ago 09:58 PM
JonEisberg
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post

S&S Yachts...a lot like Beneteaus.
Uhhh, you know that Sparkman & Stephens doesn't actually BUILD boats, right?

I can assure you of one thing, no one at S&S was responsible for those clunky deckhouse windows, that's for sure :-)



I'd be really curious to know who actually built that boat... I can find no other "S&S 42" that looks remotely like it, it sure as hell isn't a Commanche, or a Gulfstream...

It's listed in the Pacific Puddle Jump as an "S&S North American 42"... Google draws a blank on that one... And, SailboatData.com, in their index of all S&S designs by year, shows nothing...

Sailboat designs of ¬*Sparkman & Stephens by year

The hull, however, bears a strong resemblance to the Lacoste 42, S&S Design #2482, of which a total of 12 were built by Dufour:

(Uh-oh, Dufour is a production builder, right? "A lot like Beneteau", in fact, no?:-))

Sparkman & Stephens: Design 2482 - Lacoste 42/Defour 42

But clearly, that clunky deckhouse on NIRVANA NOW bears little resemblance to the sleeker Lacoste...

I wonder if perhaps someone obtained an unfinished hull from Dufour, and built the rest of the boat themselves? That's about the best I can figure... That coachroof, the windows, that hard dodger - they have all the hallmarks of a Backyard Special, to my eye...

In which case, of course, any and all bets about the quality of the build are off...

:-)

perhaps someone else can do some better detective work than I... Sounds like a mission for Jeff H, perhaps... :-)
3 Days Ago 09:14 PM
aeventyr60
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Sounds like a bit more then the build quality, design or type of boat, maybe maintenance or lack there of played a part? Two major system failures at once?
3 Days Ago 08:56 PM
smackdaddy
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Yep - this vaunted bluewater boat fell apart and sank. So when you read the relentless criticism about production boats and their "inferior" quality - remember this was an S&S 42 that definitely hit its limits (thanks to MarkC for the update)...

(Can someone repost this over at CF. Those chuckleheads really need to know before someone gets hurt.)
1 Week Ago 10:57 PM
Classic30
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by pikesbayone View Post
I've noticed that a common failure on boats sailing from the mainland to Hawaii is steering. Often rudder post breaks away. But this can be corrected by adding reinforcement. Also, chainplates on any older production boat must be regarded with suspicion. Likewise swages.
It can also be corrected by displaying some seamanship and being aware of the boat's limits, instead of just pushing the thing until it breaks 1000 miles from the nearest land.

AISI, one contributing factor is the size/power of wheel steering these days - at customer's request, of course. Back when boats had smaller wheels, it simply wasn't possible to snap the rudder post by human effort alone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pikesbayone View Post
I am skeptical of the structural integrity of some newer lightly built production boats. I have some doubts about strength of the hull where the keel joins. Also longitudinal strength of long wide after sections many older production boats were more stoutly built.
Again, there's no point blaming the manufacturer of a Mediterranean Cocktail Cruiser if the boat can't stand up to an ocean crossing. Everything is made to a price point these days - boats included.

..and, personally, I'm glad it is that way. If it wasn't, there'd be no market for older 'stoutly built' boats..
1 Week Ago 10:07 PM
pikesbayone
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

I've noticed that a common failure on boats sailing from the mainland to Hawaii is steering. Often rudder post breaks away. But this can be corrected by adding reinforcement. Also, chainplates on any older production boat must be regarded with suspicion. Likewise swages.

I am skeptical of the structural integrity of some newer lightly built production boats. I have some doubts about strength of the hull where the keel joins. Also longitudinal strength of long wide after sections many older production boats were more stoutly built.
1 Week Ago 09:24 PM
smackdaddy
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

This ain't a production boat. It's a bluewater boat - but it definitely hit the limits by experience mast and rudder issues "caused by some sort of wave action":

S&S 42: Nirvana Now



Latitude 38 - 'Lectronic Latitude

Thanks to JonE for the heads up. Just another example of how ALL boats - even the blues - have serious failures...with no reason to condemn the brand or type because of it.

S&S Yachts...a lot like Beneteaus.
03-05-2015 11:21 AM
Minnewaska
Re: Production Boats and the Limits

Quote:
Originally Posted by chall03 View Post
...But hey if bolts freak you out, your superstitious, or you like to choose anchors based on something some guy told you once in a bar then thats ok too.......
The bolts on the Mantus themselves don't freak me out, although, I find them unattractive. I have asked, in the Mantus thread itself, how the mating surfaces were tested for wear of the galvanized surfaces. Presumably, they wear against each other by slight flexing over time, as would the bolt threads. That would seem to introduce a corrosion issue, but they haven't been in the fleet long enough for us to know. I'm suspicious and find the best use for one as a stowable spare that isn't used much, therefore, little wear. If there engineering were truly superior over Rocna/Manson (which I also doubt), I would expect to see a welded version in the future. JMO.
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