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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Seamanship & Navigation > Help leaving the slip.
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Seamanship & Navigation Forum devoted to seamanship and navigation topics, including paper and electronic charting tools.


Thread: Help leaving the slip. Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-12-2009 02:24 PM
sailak
Quote:
Originally Posted by gumbeau View Post
As soon as my post count is high enough I'll send you a PM.

I know you from somewhere

Ah geez, I thought I'd covered my tracks!!
07-12-2009 01:17 PM
gumbeau
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailak View Post
A fellow a few slips over is docked port side to/bow in as I am. He single-hands his cutter frequently. I noticed he was about to leave so the wife and I watched to gain from his experience. He was able to back out and get the stern a bit to the right. Once as far back as he could go he shifted to forward and applied a considerable amount of power. I'm guessing his cutter is a full keel boat as it just didn't turn very well even with the good amount of speed he had. He missed the bow platform on the first powerboat but got the teak platform of the next boat tearing it away. We've scratched his method off the list.

What we did was ask the owner of the powerboat next to us to walk the bow out (he was motivated to assist since it was his boat in jeopardy. Worked well.

Thanks
As soon as my post count is high enough I'll send you a PM.

I know you from somewhere
07-11-2009 01:59 PM
Boasun You can call on neighbors with dinghies and use the dinks as tugs to assist your movement into clear water. Ships do this all the time. Just consider you 36 footer as a small ship.
07-11-2009 12:29 PM
L124C
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailak View Post
I do want to learn...I am learning more and more each time I go out. The ideas you and others have posted all go into the "knowledge bag" to be used if/when needed. I appreciate the knoweldge I'm able to gain here from other peoples experiences.

My remark about the 41' was somewhat in jest. Frankly, I don't have the time to start with a Sunfish or Laser and work my way up. While learning on a larger boat my be somewhat more difficult it's far from impossible. As a single-engine Cessna pilot I stepped up and was quickly checked out to fly a 4-engine WWII bomber (B-24 for those that know). I'm not afraid of a challenge.

Respectfully
Let's not be ridiculous. It's a big jump from a "Laser" to a 36' sailboat! Obviously, the matter a hand (maneuvering under power) doesn't even apply to Lasers. Your aircraft analogy is an interesting one though. Every pilot is "checked out", yet all it takes to become a sailboat Capitan is a payment! Sure...you can learn on a 36' boat. I just read an article about a couple that bought a brand new 50' cat as a starter boat, picked it up in France and went cruising. So far, they've had a great experience (despite some real bone headed moves IMO resulting from their lack of experience)! And then of course, there is the story of Tanya Albie (sp?) and many others. Isn't there a saying, "God watches over fools and children"? But then....sometimes he doesn't, your neighbors swim platform being a minor example. Anyway, I'm going far afield here, and am going to disconnect from the thread. All the best!
07-11-2009 04:39 AM
Mipcar [QUOTE=sailak;504442 As a single-engine Cessna pilot I stepped up and was quickly checked out to fly a 4-engine WWII bomber (B-24 for those that know). Respectfully[/QUOTE]

Sorry to hijack your thread.
Your comment about the Liberator caught my attention as my mate is working with the volunteer group here in Werribee, Melbourne, restoring a "Lib" for ground running display.

Mike
07-11-2009 03:02 AM
sailak
Quote:
Originally Posted by L124C View Post
Oh, I thouht you actually wanted to learn! Silly me...OK, I'm out!
I do want to learn...I am learning more and more each time I go out. The ideas you and others have posted all go into the "knowledge bag" to be used if/when needed. I appreciate the knoweldge I'm able to gain here from other peoples experiences.

My remark about the 41' was somewhat in jest. Frankly, I don't have the time to start with a Sunfish or Laser and work my way up. While learning on a larger boat my be somewhat more difficult it's far from impossible. As a single-engine Cessna pilot I stepped up and was quickly checked out to fly a 4-engine WWII bomber (B-24 for those that know). I'm not afraid of a challenge.

Respectfully
07-11-2009 02:21 AM
L124C
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailak View Post
The reason my starter boat is 36' is because I couldn't afford 41'.
Oh, I thouht you actually wanted to learn! Silly me...OK, I'm out!
07-10-2009 03:04 PM
Boasun For a heavy vessel you may want to drop and anchor straight out from your slip and heave around on the anchor rode to haul out from the slip. Just be sure that your winch or your back is up to hauling that vessel clear from the slip. Also helps if your guests do the grunt work here.
07-10-2009 01:25 AM
sailak I'm not so much unsure...it's more that I'm very aware of my lack of experience. As it turns out I'm now in a slip facing the opposite direction.

How dare the wind switch!!! I'm just starting to get this one figured out.

The reason my starter boat is 36' is because I couldn't afford 41'.

07-09-2009 11:22 PM
L124C
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailak View Post
A fellow a few slips over is docked port side to/bow in as I am. He single-hands his cutter frequently. I noticed he was about to leave so the wife and I watched to gain from his experience. He was able to back out and get the stern a bit to the right. Once as far back as he could go he shifted to forward and applied a considerable amount of power. I'm guessing his cutter is a full keel boat as it just didn't turn very well even with the good amount of speed he had. He missed the bow platform on the first powerboat but got the teak platform of the next boat tearing it away. We've scratched his method off the list.

What we did was ask the owner of the powerboat next to us to walk the bow out (he was motivated to assist since it was his boat in jeopardy. Worked well.

Thanks
If the other sailboat was as you described, you probably would have learned about as much from watching him leave as from watching your dock mates powerboat go out! Totally different animal than your boat, especially under power. 36' is a large starter boat IMO. If you are really that unsure of yourself (good to admit it!), contact your owners association in your area and see if one of them will spend an hour working with you at the dock. Or, find a similar boat in the marina (NOT a full keel cruiser!) and ask the owner if he will work with you (most I know would be happy to do it). The yacht club might also be a good source. You might also want to find an empty slip that points down wind and practice. You may come back to your slip one day to find the wind has shifted 180 degrees, then what? Your dock mate might not be around
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