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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Dockline failure from snubber
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Thread: Dockline failure from snubber Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-24-2009 06:13 PM
pdqaltair
Ah, but they do warn you to wear glasses. One failure is more obvious than the other.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sigmasailor View Post
Sure, why not let hammer manufacturers put a warning on their products stating not to insert fingers between the nail and the hammer.

What happened to good old common sence? Dont alsways blame (this seems to be a culture) someone else.
As a mountaineer and engineer of 30 years, I find line choices both interesting and obvious, but I think a description of line choice does fit with this product. Very much so.
07-24-2009 06:02 PM
sailingdog I'd highly recommend reading this post I wrote on Docklines.
07-20-2009 03:10 PM
sigmasailor
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
Well, sigma, that's why we have tort laws and juries to decide just what is and isn't reasonable. Don't confuse my statement that there IS a ground for liability, with agreeing that there should or shouldn't be one.

I'm just saying that the Snubber folks owe the OP a debt of gratitude, for reminding them that their product could easily and inexpensively be made safer--for the snubber company! not just the user.

To sell something that folks have never used, have no instructions for how to use it, and then not expect disaster, is simply naive.

Besides, hammers aren't a good analogy. You are aware that since 2008, it has been illegal to sell roofing nails and hammers or any type in the united States unless the purchaser shows proof of having taken a "Impact Tool Safety Training Course" and completing it with a passing grade? You can't just buy a hammer in the hardware store anymore, you have to be of age and licensed.
Haha, good one. If you have to be licensed to use hammers shouldn't you also be licensed to combine lines and snubber?

Seriously: I am glad to be Dutch (and blunt) and not have to be afraid of being sued for issues we would simply laugh about.

On Topic: If you look around the average marina it is amazing how many people think they can use their used sheets some more as mooring lines. Even when using the 'wrong' type of line it is amazing how it just seemed to have snapped.
07-20-2009 02:51 PM
hellosailor Well, sigma, that's why we have tort laws and juries to decide just what is and isn't reasonable. Don't confuse my statement that there IS a ground for liability, with agreeing that there should or shouldn't be one.

I'm just saying that the Snubber folks owe the OP a debt of gratitude, for reminding them that their product could easily and inexpensively be made safer--for the snubber company! not just the user.

To sell something that folks have never used, have no instructions for how to use it, and then not expect disaster, is simply naive.

Besides, hammers aren't a good analogy. You are aware that since 2008, it has been illegal to sell roofing nails and hammers or any type in the united States unless the purchaser shows proof of having taken a "Impact Tool Safety Training Course" and completing it with a passing grade? You can't just buy a hammer in the hardware store anymore, you have to be of age and licensed.
07-20-2009 01:49 PM
argofred thanks guys........... anchor line is a heckava lot of chain and nylon rode. I rechecked after this episode! fred
07-20-2009 01:26 PM
tweitz As long as we are talking about lines, Argofred should also check his anchor line. It should be nylon also, or he may be in for a very unpleasant surprise.
07-20-2009 01:17 PM
SEMIJim
Quote:
Originally Posted by sigmasailor View Post
Sure, why not let hammer manufacturers put a warning on their products stating not to insert fingers between the nail and the hammer.
I agree, but this is an apples and oranges comparison. IMO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sigmasailor View Post
What happened to good old common sence? Dont alsways blame (this seems to be a culture) someone else.
They're snubbers. Now, correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the purpose of snubbers to give elasticity to dock lines? If so: Is it really all that unreasonable for somebody to use them in just the way argofred did?

And would it really be all that much trouble for the manufacturer to put a little note in about recommended use?

Jim
07-20-2009 12:17 PM
argofred My mistake ............I meant polyester. I keep getting polypro and polyester terms mixed up. What a way to get a lesson in lines! Thanks all!
07-20-2009 11:21 AM
bubb2 Most running rigging like Sta-Set is Polyester not Polypropylene.
07-20-2009 09:24 AM
NCC320 argofred...

There's lot more to lines than just nylon and polyproplene. Get a copy of West Marine's catalog and look at what they offer and the advice that they give. Polyproplene (in general except where you want a floating line such as a ski rope) is a horrible line for boats...little shock absorbing stretch and deteriorates extremely fast (i.e. looses its strength) when exposed to sunlight. There are two basic lines for boating today .. first is nylon for dock lines and anchor rodes...strong, elastic to absorb shock. Comes in several make ups with three strand or double braided mosty common. Both stretch, but double braid stetches less but stays more flexible so it's easier to handle. Either one works for dock lines. If you are in a rough spot, be sure to have extra lines of a suitable size. Working load of lines is normally about 15% of breaking strength. Chafe, not line strength is going to be your worry, so protect the line anywhere the line will rub on something or take a sharp turn around an object. Polyester has comparable strength to nylon but less stretch...there are lots of variations by manufacturers to get less stretch for halyards, so don't use these for dock lines (except in severe storm conditions as backups to nylon lines when you have no other lines ...and then use them slacker than the nylon lines. There are a whole range of new exotic new special application line types that have been developed for halyards and other applications where very high strength and very low stretch is desired....these lines are extremely expensive and usually of little concern for the average, non racing sailor. None are suitable for dock lines. Stay away from the cheap "poly" lines that are also sometimes labeled nylon that are sold in some non boating stores...most short cut the manufacturing steps needed for good line and often use significant amount of polyproplene....which looses strength in sunlight.
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