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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Winterizing furling jib
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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-29-2013 12:15 AM
davidpm
Re: Winterizing furling jib

Quote:
Originally Posted by NICHOLSON58 View Post
Removing the halyards is good but if you don't want to go that far just fasten runners to the shackles and hoist the shackle to the mast head. Cover the halyerd coil away from the sun.
Is the idea here to just keep as much of the halyard out of the elements as possible?
08-26-2013 03:02 PM
maureeno123
Re: Winterizing furling jib

Thank you. We did what you said, and shook it to death. When we raised the jib the following spring, we noticed the furling hardware would separate, and the jib would get stuck. We waited until the wind blew the jib to the opposite side, which was port, and then pulled it up as fast as we could to the next connection of the furling hardware.
12-29-2009 12:16 AM
NICHOLSON58 I would not ever consider leaving sails up for winter or for any period exceeding the time for which I could predict there to be no violent storms. Go to YouTube and search for marina and boat storm damage following hurricanes. Most heavy boat and marina damage happens where people left sails on the jib furlers. They become at least partially unfurled and cause the ruin of the docks, anchorage, other boats. Our Camper & Nicholson 58 was acquired following exactly such an event at the previous owner's private dock in Ft Lauderdale. Before the two roler furled jibs exploded, the load on the dock lines tore the ears from the metal cleats on the dock. The boat T-Boned a sea wall and careened down the canal taking out docks and pilings.

All good advice above: remove sails from the boat. Store in a clean dry place (not inside the boat). Removing the halyards is good but if you don't want to go that far just fasten runners to the shackles and hoist the shackle to the mast head. Cover the halyerd coil away from the sun.

This is the first winter we are storing with the mast up (keel stepped). We also added a proper winter cover. Water has a way of finding our halyard slots and the openings at the mast head. It runs down the inside of the mast and to the bilge. A major three-day rain may result in 15 to 20 gallons in the bilge. Many of my yard mates remove mast head instruments (also a good idea) and cover the mast head with a heavy duty trash bag to minimize water entry. Once the winter cover was on, I have noticed a large amount of condensation on the upper surfaces inside of the cabin so I took steps to let the cabin breathe. The new cover is above the bimini so we left the main hatch open and cracked open several of the hatches. Most floor boards are propped up. This seems to have dropped the RH inside so that it is not wet. We are stored in a reasonably safe yard so I'm not too worried. Also, we remove anything with an LCD on it so all electronics winter in the basement.
11-16-2009 11:17 AM
JohnRPollard
Quote:
Originally Posted by maureeno123 View Post
When we went to take down our furling jib, we undid the halyard, but when the jib got about 3 ft down, it seemed to get stuck on something. We have a 39 CC Pearson, and I don't know if that has anything to do with it, but want to give all the info. When we looked up, it seemed a round, small baskety, softball size thing at the top of the jib, left half of itself behind, and with the bottom half of it still attached, seemingly, it could not come all the way down. We think something must have broken, and cannot tell without going up in a bosun's chair. We are in CT, and it is getting windy and cold. If someone has some thoughts on what we are doing wrong, or doing nothing wrong, but someone has to go up, please let me know. Thank you for your help. Hoping we are doing something wrong, and someone out there just tells us what, and everything will work. Maureen O'Donnell, Bridgeport, CT

Hi Maureen,

I hope you've solved your problem by now. If not, it sounds to me like you might have some halyard wrap up near the top of your headstay.

The jib/genoa halyard can get wrapped around the headstay/foiler extrusion up near the top. Sometimes with luck you can unwind it by spinning the furled headsail around the extrusion, or even shaking enough slack into the halyard to allow you to drop the sail, then unwind the halyard from the headstay. If you're less lucky, you may have to send someone up the mast to unwind the halyard,

That "round, small baskety, softball size thing at the top of the jib, left half of itself behind, " is actually part of the furling hardware. As you know, there is a furling drum down near the tack of the sail. Attached to the head of the sail, there is a furling "swivel". That swivel unit slides up the foiler extrusion when you hoist the sail up with the halyard. When it gets to full height, the swivel nests into a fixed top terminal, which is probably the component that you described as "left behind."

The best way to prevent halyard wrap in the future, is to install a halyard restrainer, which holds the halyard away from the swivel and headstay at a correct angle for hoisting. These get installed on the mast a few inches below where the halyard exits the upper sheave, and are well worth the investment.
11-11-2009 01:02 PM
maureeno123
winterizing furling jib

When we went to take down our furling jib, we undid the halyard, but when the jib got about 3 ft down, it seemed to get stuck on something. We have a 39 CC Pearson, and I don't know if that has anything to do with it, but want to give all the info. When we looked up, it seemed a round, small baskety, softball size thing at the top of the jib, left half of itself behind, and with the bottom half of it still attached, seemingly, it could not come all the way down. We think something must have broken, and cannot tell without going up in a bosun's chair. We are in CT, and it is getting windy and cold. If someone has some thoughts on what we are doing wrong, or doing nothing wrong, but someone has to go up, please let me know. Thank you for your help. Hoping we are doing something wrong, and someone out there just tells us what, and everything will work. Maureen O'Donnell, Bridgeport, CT
11-01-2009 12:34 AM
CalebD Don't feel bad.
We lost our main halyard up the mast three weeks ago while trying to raise our main sail for the 2nd time in a long motoring trip up the Hudson on a windy day. The shackle at the end of our halyard decided to let go and needs to be replaced.
We got lucky when a friend of a boat owner we knew volunteered his 14 year old to haul up the mast the next day. We used the mast crane on our dock to haul this nice kid up most of the way and our spin halyard to get him to the top to grab the main sail shackle and bring him back down. Quite a few rounds are now owed to the father of the young lad who helped us out.
Spit happens. Even though I was not personally hauling on the halyard I am also accountable for the oversight.
What about pulling the mast for the winter and fixing that problem while on the hard?
10-31-2009 11:28 PM
Zagloba I got the message.

Instead of climbing though, I have some cherry picker work to do this winter anyway: replace a shroud boot, install LED bulbs on the anchor and steaming lights, replace the deck light bulb, and now pull down the halyard.

Your help is appreciated.
10-31-2009 11:11 PM
Bene505
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zagloba View Post
I have swapped out jibs on my Hood roller furler on my Catalina 27 TR, but I have never removed the sail for the winter before. So I am happy to get it down and stowed, and my casual thought was to attach the halyard shackle to the drum shackle, but they do not get close enough to connect.

What to do? With out thinking much I just raised the halyard back up the forestay and locked it down. Yea, then on the way home it hit me, how will I get that halyard down in the spring. I have not tried it yet, but I doubt that releasing the halyard line will permit it to slide down. Am I screwed? Will it slide down or is there some old trick to grab it and bring it down?

Everything went well in winterizing, but I have a hanging halyard about 34 feet above the deck. Any help appreciated.
Find someone who is really good with a bow and arrow? Tie a string onto the arrow.

Attack a coat hanger to another halyard (part way up the halyard so you don't lose that one too) with a hook at the top of the coat hanger. Then try to raise the hanger and hook the other halyard.

Go up the mast.

Regards,
Brad

By the way, although tempted on an earlier post, our sails are now folded up and stored in our furnace room. They are store off the concrete floor, so no potential moisture from below can get to them It's warm and VERY dry down there.

Here's looking forward to spring!!
10-31-2009 09:57 PM
T37Chef Somebody is climbing the mast...sorry to say
10-31-2009 07:47 PM
Zagloba
Big OOPs when removing roller furling jib

I have swapped out jibs on my Hood roller furler on my Catalina 27 TR, but I have never removed the sail for the winter before. So I am happy to get it down and stowed, and my casual thought was to attach the halyard shackle to the drum shackle, but they do not get close enough to connect.

What to do? With out thinking much I just raised the halyard back up the forestay and locked it down. Yea, then on the way home it hit me, how will I get that halyard down in the spring. I have not tried it yet, but I doubt that releasing the halyard line will permit it to slide down. Am I screwed? Will it slide down or is there some old trick to grab it and bring it down?

Everything went well in winterizing, but I have a hanging halyard about 34 feet above the deck. Any help appreciated.
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