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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > wood renewal
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-06-2006 11:39 AM
sailnaway
wood renewal

Good site if you want to replace wood or cabin floor http://www.worldpanel.com/good information.
01-25-2006 05:48 PM
admin
wood renewal

Here''s a good site also:

http://www.anzam.com/howto_index_001.htm

Terry
01-25-2006 05:44 PM
admin
wood renewal

Like many other cruisers, I keep the sole covered with indoor-outdoor carpet. A varnished cabin sole is TOO DANGEROUS when underway in any moderate seaway, especially when it gets wet. And it WILL get wet!

Having said that, you may want to check out a product at:
http://www.ultimatesole.com/Scripts/prodList.asp?idCategory=6

A test of this was done by a professional yacht refinisher at:

http://www.fujiyachts.net/bbs/viewtopic.php?t=45

For the rest of the interior it''s one of those ''labors of love'' to get a smooth finish. Many layers with wet-sanding in between gives the best, though laborious, result. And don''t be afraid to spray the final coats ... I have varnished surfaces on the interior that were done 10 years ago and you can still see your reflection in them!

You can see some of this at:
http://www.fujiyachts.net/bbs/viewtopic.php?t=44

Good luck with the project.

Terry
01-25-2006 01:18 PM
mary jewell
wood renewal

When you sand off the old finish, you sand away wood also, the heat gun and scraper will simply remove the finish. Chemical strippers also work very well. I think the polyurethane stands up to wear and tear better, esp. on the cabin sole.
01-25-2006 01:17 PM
mary jewell
wood renewal

When you sand off the old finish, you sand away wood also, the heat gun and scraper will simply remove the finish. Chemical strippers also work very well. I think the polyurethane stands up to wear and tear better, esp. on the cabin sole.
01-25-2006 01:17 PM
mary jewell
wood renewal

When you sand off the old finish, you sand away wood also, the heat gun and scraper will simply remove the finish. Chemical strippers also work very well. I think the polyurethane stands up to wear and tear better, esp. on the cabin sole.
01-15-2006 07:58 AM
merc2dogs
wood renewal


May not be for everyone, but what I''ve done with some seriously damaged wood is to pull it up, clean out any nails/screws etc, and run it through a planer to get the gouges out, then re-install it with a plywood subfloor to keep the strength up, not realy needed on lightly damaged wood where only a slight clean up thicknessing was needed,or where it sits directly on a supporting surface. and fo veneers it''s out of the question, but veneers can be easily repaired with a patch, cut a bit of veneer larger than the damage, in an irregular shape (not a square or circle, oval triangle or diamond is ok) then set it over the patch and trace around the outside with a sharp pencil, then with an exacto knife, cut just inside the pencil mark, and chip out the old veneer with a small chisel then slowly creep up on the best fit for the patch with the knife. glue the patch in, sand and finish. carefully choosing your patch and aligning the grain can make the repair invisible. works for solid wood too, but it''s more difficult to make the hole you need. the patch sounds a lot harder than it is, with practice you can do a patch in 5 minutes. and it''s the easiest fastest way to go


Do the same on seriously messed up hatchboards, run them through the planer to get a smooth surface, then either place a spacer strip on the edges, or move the track sides closer.

Also, most boats are symetrical, so you can sometimes ''flip'' the sole and put a clean unworn surface up, if it''s planked you can sometimes get by with flipping just the damaged boards, but sometimes you have to remove the whole sole anyway, so it''s just as good to flip the whole thing.


Ken.
01-11-2006 07:34 AM
Irwin32
wood renewal

Mary, I have the same job ahead of me this spring. Why is the heat gun preferable to the stripper?

Will the polyurethane wear better than spar varnish?
01-10-2006 04:43 AM
bigsarg1
wood renewal

thanks for the info.
01-09-2006 07:29 PM
mary jewell
wood renewal

So, are you talking about simply refinishing the wood, or replacing the wood? If there are deep gouges, and you want a perfect job, replacing may be the way to go. But myself, I have a 22 year old boat, with lots of wear and tear on the cabin sole. It is the traditional teak and holly. I didn''t want to sand away too much of the wood, so I stripped the old varish off with a heat gun and scraper. The stubborn areas, I used liquid stripper. Then a light sanding with 240 grit paper made it nice, for deep gouges, they can be filled with epoxy mixed with the same type and color wood shavings,or dust from sanding, and lightly sand those areas. Wipe the area down with acetone, and make sure it is dust free, a tack rag works great for this. You can either use varnish or use polyurethane. I recently redid my sole and this time I used the polyurethane, and I like it alot....3 coats with light sanding in between coats. I had to wait 48 hours in btwn. coats, only drawback to the polyurethane. I understand that it lasts quite well in high travel areas.. It looks gorgeous...then I throw rugs over it all, and you can''t even tell I redid them!!!!
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