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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > Jack Line - Home Made?
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Thread: Jack Line - Home Made? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-17-2009 11:39 AM
tommays At work we have to use fall restraints with clutches that do a nice slow down , the old style would do almost as much dammage as falling
11-17-2009 01:09 AM
blt2ski I looked up the knot, it is a water knot

here is a link on how to tie one!
CUSA Press - Inspiring and Informing your Canyon Adventures

Marty
11-16-2009 10:43 PM
pdqaltair
Actually, when falling right against the anchor with a nonstretch tether, the fall...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarros View Post
While you carabiners are not meant for side load, if you're not out in a hurricane, where the boat gets picked up, and you get dropped from one end of the boat to the other, you're not going to be doing anything vaguely approaching fall factor two. While some climbing equipment (eg, dynamic ropes) will fail before, say, the human pelvis is powdered, most carabiners, even the nice wire gate ones which don't freeze up on ice climbs, are going be able to hold a human in any conceivable situation on a boat.

My bigger question would be making sure you had locking carabiners instead, nothing would suck more than going back and forth, dragging the carabiner enough to open the gate, and then falling, to have it fall off.

Of course, if load was an issue, and if you didn't want to be scraping a biner back and forth along your nice cabin top/deck you could make some webbing loops and just clip into those. You'd want to replace them pretty often, but they'd bend so that the load would always be from the correct direction, and they'd be a lot nicer to your decks finish.

Once again, armchair physics/math here, so please don't bet your life on anything I'm saying. Thanks.

-- James
factor can far exceed 2. Try a 2' fall on 4' of webbing and see how it feels. Actual, please don't do that. You will be injured.

Yes, the biners on the jackline end must be lockers. It is worth repeating.

I pulled the gate sideways out of a biner once in a modest fall. A bit of rock pressed it sideways. Not on a locker. I knew it was a bad spot and had a backup a few feet away.
11-16-2009 10:42 PM
blt2ski
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdqaltair View Post
It is a trace overhand.
Thanks,

I knew it was a something or other! been awhile since I climbed, ie mid 80s, but remember the knot!
11-16-2009 10:32 PM
pdqaltair
Quote:
Originally Posted by blt2ski View Post
Not sure if it is the right or best way........ I do not remember the name of the not other than a reverse overhand. ie tie and over hand knot, then run the end thru and tighten. Typical knot use to tie climbing loops.
Marty
It is a trace overhand.
11-16-2009 09:03 PM
casioqv I am also a climber- and I use my climbing rope as a jackline, tied to the fore and aft cleats on my boat. On my boat (Catalina 22), and probably many others- a taught jackline rests against the side of the cabin, not on the deck so there is no risk of it rolling underfoot even if it's round.

I don't trust the stock cleats to hold against a strong fall, so I tied the ends of the rope together at the stern to make a continuous loop around the boat. This way if one or all of the cleats were to break or rip free of the deck, I would still have a "lasso" around the entire boat.
11-16-2009 08:52 PM
blt2ski Not sure if it is the right or best way........ I took and put a U-bolt thru the cabin top, then ran some 1" webbing to the bow cleats I got from REI. I do not remember the name of the not other than a reverse overhand. ie tie and over hand knot, then run the end thru and tighten. Typical knot use to tie climbing loops. For working in Puget sound where I am, in 3-5' seas, this will work to keep bow folks on the boat. I am not planning on doing any off shore work in a hurricane or equal.

I do not personally have a sewing machine that is strong enough to tie loops, and if I did, I would have to trust my sewing, hence why I tied the knot! I trust this more than sewing a loop!

Marty
11-16-2009 01:37 PM
jbarros The only caveat to sewing your own loops, as opposed to using water knots or the like is, obviously, but it still bears mention, make sure that the stitching is strong enough to not be the weakest link. Nothing worse than having your last thoughts before being swept off the boat "oh yeah, I forgot, I can't sew" (This is why I personally rely on knots, I know I can tie those and tie them safely. If you can sew, FOR LOAD BEARING GEAR more power to you. )

-- James
11-16-2009 10:31 AM
GMC
Encouraging

All these thoughts have been encouraging (on the common sense and economic fronts). I don't mind spending money if necessary, but these ideas convince me that with some webbing and a sewing machine, I can have a safe system.
11-16-2009 02:07 AM
jbarros While you carabiners are not meant for side load, if you're not out in a hurricane, where the boat gets picked up, and you get dropped from one end of the boat to the other, you're not going to be doing anything vaguely approaching fall factor two. While some climbing equipment (eg, dynamic ropes) will fail before, say, the human pelvis is powdered, most carabiners, even the nice wire gate ones which don't freeze up on ice climbs, are going be able to hold a human in any conceivable situation on a boat.

My bigger question would be making sure you had locking carabiners instead, nothing would suck more than going back and forth, dragging the carabiner enough to open the gate, and then falling, to have it fall off.

Of course, if load was an issue, and if you didn't want to be scraping a biner back and forth along your nice cabin top/deck you could make some webbing loops and just clip into those. You'd want to replace them pretty often, but they'd bend so that the load would always be from the correct direction, and they'd be a lot nicer to your decks finish.

Once again, armchair physics/math here, so please don't bet your life on anything I'm saying. Thanks.

-- James
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