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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > New Anchor
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Topic Review (Newest First)
11-28-2009 12:52 PM
Faster When cruising a Bene 36.7 in the Caribbean we're using a 30-ish pound anchor (of a type I don't recognize - Danforth style but different) and 120 feet of chain with a 30 foot strop on the end. It's always fully deployed. No windlass.

But we never anchor in more than 6-7 meters so we never have to 'pick up' more that that much chain at any one time, so it's been manageable.

Here at home it's a 35lb CQR with 40 feet chain and nylon - again no windlass so we try to limit our depth to 40 feet or less so I don't have to hand-bomb the entire anchor/chain weight for too long. We have never dragged with this combination but.. mostly our nights at anchor are in well chosen anchorages with little or no wind overnight.
11-28-2009 11:48 AM
AdamLein
Quote:
Originally Posted by wind_magic View Post
For me that means 80+lbs with chain, and I don't care if its a 40 foot boat or a 25 foot boat so long as I can set it.
Where would you store an 80-lb anchor on a 25-ft boat?

Quote:
it seems like above about 20 feet in length you are reaching the point where whatever a human being (and windlass) can deploy and retrieve is best
Not all boats have windlasses... my 27-footer doesn't. However with a chain stopper or pawl and a roller there's no reason a fit person shouldn't be able to haul, say, 50-60 lbs of ground tackle by hand.
11-28-2009 10:21 AM
painkiller Hey, Night0wl!

My 343 came with a 20lb Delta and I've never felt any concern about it here in the Chesapeake. I will note that we haven't spent a night aboard in anything over 25 knots. It's probably not apples-to-apples, but I would think that the 35lb anchor you're considering would be adequate as a primary. Put on an extra 6' feet of chain leader if you want a little more insurance.

For a storm anchor, I have a Fortress FX-37. It's sized for a 46'-51' boat. When I pull it out, the ladies shriek and faint (wink to mitiempo).
11-28-2009 05:39 AM
wind_magic
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
For a good sleep. I look at a good anchor as insurance. [...] I just hope they don't anchor upwind of me. When people laugh at how big your anchor is compared to theirs I think you're on the right track. [...]
Quote:
Originally Posted by klem View Post
[...] This comes from having spent thousands of nights on the hook at this point and having dealt with many different situations. Knowing that your anchor is overkill will let you sleep even when there are thunderstorms or wind forecast(maybe a bit more lightly then).

[...]

I see an anchor as an insurance policy.

[...]
I like these comments a lot. I think there is too much talk in anchoring about what is convenient and easy to use, etc. That does figure into it, the anchor isn't any good if you can't break it free from the bottom and get it back on the boat, but shouldn't our first priority be making sure we don't end up on the beach ?

I don't have much experience compared to most of you guys, but I won't let that influence me when I am choosing ground tackle. I want super heavy, lots of anchors, lots of rode, lots of options. The anchors in my estimation are one of the most important things on the boat and I'd go without a radio before I'd go without heavy anchors.

I see no reason not to go with the largest anchor you can handle every single time you anchor. The only justification someone could have for not using the largest anchor they could deploy and retrieve is convenience. For me that means 80+lbs with chain, and I don't care if its a 40 foot boat or a 25 foot boat so long as I can set it.

If I was in an anchorage and I watched someone drop a 100+lb anchor off the bow of their 30 footer, I wouldn't laugh, I'd just smile and think to myself that they've been there done that, and got the anchor to prove it.

You can have too much sail, you can have too much keel, too much hull, etc, but can you ever really have too much anchor ? At some point it becomes a weight issue, sure, you wouldn't put an 80lb anchor on your sailing dinghy, but it seems like above about 20 feet in length you are reaching the point where whatever a human being (and windlass) can deploy and retrieve is best, just my opinion.

11-27-2009 11:47 PM
klem I am a firm believer in 1 large primary anchor and a second "storm" anchor. This comes from having spent thousands of nights on the hook at this point and having dealt with many different situations. Knowing that your anchor is overkill will let you sleep even when there are thunderstorms or wind forecast(maybe a bit more lightly then).

A lot has been written about putting 2 anchors in series and I have tried it once just to see for myself. It is very difficult to tell if both anchors are set and a veer in the wind direction will cause problems.

Putting 2 anchors out in a V is definitely a viable technique but you shouldn't be doing it everytime it is blowing. The biggest advantage to this method on a lot of modern boats is that the bow doesn't blow around as much. Still, if you get a wind shift, all of the load is on 1 anchor and if you are sailing on the hook, it will momentarily alternate between anchors.

I see an anchor as an insurance policy. I spent 9 years working on a 70GT vessel that had to lay to its anchor when things got rough since there were no other options and we were always thankful that the anchors were very large. Over the years, we watched plenty of yachts drag their anchors because the wind shifted or picked up just a little bit. Even when people woke up, they often didn't have time to react before being up on the beach. In my opinion, both setting ability and holding power are key to a good anchor.

There are some people who will claim that you need an even bigger anchor than I do. Many of these people feel that if you are trying to enter a harbor in 50 knot winds and associated winds and your engine dies, your anchor should be able to hold you through the storm. Knowing that I will see 50-60knots or more at least once a season on the hook makes me agree with the wind but I don't expect my anchor to hold in open water with the waves.
11-27-2009 09:39 PM
mitiempo For a good sleep. I look at a good anchor as insurance. Interesting comments from Steve Dashew who has a great deal of real world experience. He considers manufacturers tables as a joke. He suggests a 30 to 40 foot boat use a 60 lb anchor, if it is a modern one like a Rocna and all chain rode. I realize there are many people anchoring their 35 ft boat with a 12 lb Danforth high tensile - after all Danforth states it's good for boats up to 42 ft in 20 knots! I just hope they don't anchor upwind of me. When people laugh at how big your anchor is compared to theirs I think you're on the right track. See this link for Steve's comments.
SetSail » Blog Archive » How Big Should Your Anchor Be?
11-27-2009 06:24 PM
JohnRPollard
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
I don't understand why you'd use a lighter anchor and keep one a bit heavier for a storm anchor. I'd use the heavier one and sleep better....
Another way to look at it is, why would you use a storm-sized anchor for routine use when you don't need it? Wear out your back and/or windlass for what?

Putting two anchors in series is a good compromise.
11-27-2009 05:36 PM
mitiempo I don't understand why you'd use a lighter anchor and keep one a bit heavier for a storm anchor. I'd use the heavier one and sleep better. If as has been said you're going to only anchor a few times a year in calmer conditions I think the 33 lb Rocna is a good choice. If on the other hand you're going to go offshore and rely on your anchor a lot more I'd go with one size up. I agree with dog that the Rocna is better built than the Manson. I agree with klem on sizing. I currently have a 25lb CQR but won't replace it with a 22 lb, but a 33 lb Rocna. Boat is 27', 6100 lbs designed disp but easily 1500 more ready for offshore. And you have a windlass - I don't.
11-27-2009 04:33 PM
wind_magic I'm one of those who thinks no anchor is ever big enough, but I know that isn't very reasonable.
11-27-2009 04:09 PM
night0wl
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnRPollard View Post
Hard to tell from the video, but that claw doesn't look like the 15kg version. Maybe it's the 10kg (22lb), which would be on the small side for your boat. You could bump up to a larger claw for relatively small change...

Good point...the 15kg claw is only $100 vs $400 for either the Manson or Rocna. Thats a lot of boat bucks.
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