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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance > furling line blocks or bullseyes
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Thread: furling line blocks or bullseyes Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-05-2009 11:30 PM
BigZ The intent was always to use the stanchions or toerails as mounting sources, never drilling into the deck. I've learned not to bring a drill near the deck; it acts as a divining rod and seems to find wet core faster than I want to deal with it.

Good points regarding the first lead. Unfortunately I won't be able to put all these ideas to use until April when the mast gets back up.
12-05-2009 09:28 PM
GaryHLucas I've seen lots of roller furlers that didn't work well, and have fixed a few. The most important block is the first one near the drum, and you need to buy what ever kind puts it in the right place. The right place is that under tension the line is exactly centered on the drum perpendicular to the axis. The farther away you can locate this block from the drum the better. The reason for this is the line will level wind much better in this location. You get this right and you will be amazed at how much better it works, friction or no friction!

Gary H. Lucas
12-05-2009 10:23 AM
knothead
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeelHaulin View Post
Why on a new installation would anyone want to drill, pot, and bed bullseyes onto the deck; when you can just slap the lead blocks onto the stanchions and be done?? There are some products that are worth a few extra bucks to save time, add convenience, and prevents putting new holes in the deck and this is just one of those (IMHO).

I agree. But there are bulleyes that attach to stanchions the same way that lead blocks do.
I have seen some boats where they have led the furling line over the top of the cabin house. I never really liked it much but for some boats it makes sense to keep all the lines in one area.
12-05-2009 05:12 AM
floatsome
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigZ View Post
... my Ranger 26. Travesty. Just wondering what folks recommend as far as the furling line blocks.
Start of last summer we put the Harken kit on our 27' boat. Very neat and simple. Only comes in 1", but I split stainless steel tubing to act as spacer for those stanchions that are 7/8" (we have a mix). When I replaced 3 stanchions on each side I ended up going with 1" because there seem to be no 7/8" parts around these days, although there are lots of old boats with 7/8".
12-05-2009 04:48 AM
KeelHaulin Why on a new installation would anyone want to drill, pot, and bed bullseyes onto the deck; when you can just slap the lead blocks onto the stanchions and be done?? There are some products that are worth a few extra bucks to save time, add convenience, and prevents putting new holes in the deck and this is just one of those (IMHO).
12-04-2009 10:06 PM
nickmerc Save your money and follow what COOL said. I have that setup, minus the ractchet block, on my boat with the bullseyes on the outside of the stantions. Works great and is much less than the fancier systems. I sprang for the expensive stainless lined bullseyes as it cut down on friction and they don't wear out each season.
________
WATERBONGS
12-04-2009 09:24 PM
BELLATRIX1965
Ratchet Block

I second what COOL said - we used to have problems with reefing line jams at the furler drum. Installed a ratchet block AFT of the cockpit, so the furling line has to make almost a 180 turn - this automatically keeps some tension on the line as you let out the genny. No more fouled furling drum!
The Harken dual-roller jobbies are nice, but if your stanchions are not 1", you have to add spacers (mine are 7/8" - go figure) to make up the difference. Not a big deal, but something to consider. Garhauer is good stuff - worth a look?
12-04-2009 06:51 PM
knothead I would recommend bullseyes where you are only trying to contain the line and lead blocks where the line is deflected or turned. Using a ratchet block as the aft articulating block is a good idea.
Be certain that the first articulating block behind the furler is positioned as close to perpendicular to the drum as you can get it. Then by imparting a little drag on the line as the sail unfurls you will get a nice wind.
12-04-2009 06:49 PM
braidmike Just a quick note to give a little more choice in hardware: check out Garhuer blocks. They make a real nice stanchion block in three sizes Garhauer Marine Hardware -447824 (I don't have a ny financial interest in Garhauer). I replaced all of my deck hardware with Garhauer manufactured equipment, and was very impressed with the quality and service.
12-04-2009 06:11 PM
BigZ Thanks for the input. Sounds like getting the right amount of drag on the system might be something I can putz with for a few months next season, maybe longer if I drag it out enough.
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