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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related) > Can't find the Life Jacket I want
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Thread: Can't find the Life Jacket I want Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-06-2009 11:23 PM
davidpm
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryHLucas View Post
It seems to me the only completely failsafe PFD is the one that keeps you on board!

Gary H. Lucas

Thats exactly why I'm rethinking the subject. If I can't find a harness that will work well with my life jacket I may have to trust in an inflatable.

The main reason I'm rethinking this is that I'm contemplating more solo sailing.
12-06-2009 11:20 PM
davidpm
Quote:
Originally Posted by mintcakekeith View Post
I dont know where you sail but where I am you would be lucky to last 3 hrs after that it would be irrelevant how long the life jacket stayed inflated.
I sail in the Long Island Sound so according to the following resource I could have as much as several days in the warmest part of the year.
Of course now it would be only a few hours.



How does the Coast Guard decide when to call off a search-and-rescue mission? - By Christopher Beam - Slate Magazine
To determine someone's odds of survival, the Coast Guard uses software developed by the Canadian Defense Department called the Cold Exposure Survivability Model. Plug in various factors—water temperature, air temperature, the person's height and weight, garments worn, time of disappearance, access to flotation devices—and the program tells you how long the person is likely to stay alive. In general, someone floating in 50 degree water can only survive four hours (PDF). In 65 degree water, which was the temperature off the Florida coast this week, it takes the average person as many as seven hours to lose consciousness. If the water temperature is above 70 degrees, he could survive for days—that is, if he doesn't die of thirst or exposure first. (The CESM can also calculate the odds of survival if someone is lost on land in cold weather.)
12-06-2009 08:24 PM
GaryHLucas It seems to me the only completely failsafe PFD is the one that keeps you on board!

Gary H. Lucas
12-06-2009 11:25 AM
mintcakekeith But as someone said fixed flotation can not deflate. So I wonder if the Spinlock would remain buoyant for three days until I either was rescued or died of thirst.[/QUOTE]

I dont know where you sail but where I am you would be lucky to last 3 hrs after that it would be irrelevant how long the life jacket stayed inflated.
12-05-2009 11:45 PM
MC1 My understanding is that it's normal to have to top-off inflatable vests once in a while using the manual inflation tube if you're in the water for quite a long time.

The other down-side I've read about inflatables is that they are so bouyant, it can be harder to swim in them than a non-inflatable. But you shouldn't be doing too much swimming while you're waiting for someone to home in on your EPIRB signal (you did leave the boat with one of those, right?). Swimming accelerates heat loss leaving you more voulnerable to the second biggest cause of marine deaths - hypothermia.

For us paranoid types, the other thing I really like about the Spinlock vest is the built in harness without those really heavy D-rings. Add the harness strap - and you've reduced another really big risk factor - you're more likely to stay on the boat in the first place!

Jeesh, its exhausting being paranoid .
12-05-2009 10:21 PM
davidpm
Quote:
Originally Posted by MC1 View Post
The new Spinlock auto-inflatable Deckvests seem to be enginered to take into account a broad range of the previously mentioned concerns (although no one product will address every worst case scenario), but they're not cheap. They are very strong, light weight, and have lots of features. Some might prefer a simpler approach though.

Welcome to the Spinlock Website
Yes I was looking at that model. It is truly amazing. Can anyone find anything negative about it. I sure hope someone can trash it other wise I will be tempted.

The risk calculation changes with a unit this good. My cheap standard vest is guaranteed to work all the time because it has no mechanism to fail. The Spinlock however will keep my face up and has the spray hood which would be better if unconscious or in rough seas.
So what is more likely, being unconscious or the mechanism not working? I suspect being unconscious is more likely as everyone has said the mechanism is well tested for a long time.

But as someone said fixed flotation can not deflate. So I wonder if the Spinlock would remain buoyant for three days until I either was rescued or died of thirst.
12-05-2009 10:08 PM
davidpm
Quote:
Originally Posted by painkiller View Post
Here's a YMCA near you: ymca loc: Manassas, VA - Google Maps

Learn to swim!
Florida Maritime Accident Lawyer - How Long can you Tread Water? About 30 minutes is the max

While knowing how to swim may buy someone some time, and certainly can't hurt, it is not even a close substitute for a life vest.

Without a life jacket even the best of swimmers will be exhausted in minutes.

If someone does not wear a life jacket that's their choice of course.
But if they try to tell me that the "REASON" is that they know how to swim I immediately knee them in the groin, to simulate hitting a life line, then through them overboard. As they suck in saltwater I calmly ask them to demonstrate their vaunted swimming skills unless they would rather grab the dock line I through their way.

A nice dip at anchorage on a sunny day fine but to unexpectedly find oneself in the water even in good conditions is something entirely different.


COAST GUARD AUXILIARY CONCERNED OVER RISE IN BOATING FATALITIES
Leading Cause: 90% of drowning fatalities in 2006 - victims were not wearing a life jacket

LOS ANGELES, Calif. - The Coast Guard Auxiliary is once again expressing great concern at the increase in the number of boating fatalities and injuries, and plans to step up its efforts to remind boaters that "You're In Command - Boat responsibly."

Published reports by U.S. Coast Guard Office of Auxiliary and Boating Safety, show that for the second consecutive year; the number of boating fatalities increased (710 deaths in 2006 vs. 697 in 2005) as did the number of injuries (3,474 injuries in 2006 vs. 3,451 in 2005). The reports also show some other consistent and disturbing facts; two-thirds of all fatal boating accident victims drowned. Of those, 90 percent were not wearing their life jackets.
12-05-2009 07:04 AM
MC1 As I'm also a little paranoid, when I test my auto-infatable vest next time, I'll also test using its manual inflation tube. If the auto-inflate mechanism fails (rare if the pill is not expired), next I'd try its manual inflation pull cord, and if that still didn't work, it'd blow it up using the manual inflation tube.

I think you eliminate the most risk by going with which ever PFD you'd actaully wear, whatever your preferences are. I've read in many places that most marine deaths by far are due to no PFD at all.

The new Spinlock auto-inflatable Deckvests seem to be enginered to take into account a broad range of the previously mentioned concerns (although no one product will address every worst case scenario), but they're not cheap. They are very strong, light weight, and have lots of features. Some might prefer a simpler approach though.

Welcome to the Spinlock Website

DW-LJH/A2
The Deckvest is the latest evolution of Spinlock's award winning harness and lifejacket technology

Features and BenefitsNew Deckvest model approved to ISO12402-3; the new International standard for lifejackets and ISO12401 for Deck Safety Harnesses
Compact 3D Shape, with front opening belt system for fast and secure fitting every time
Wide range of chest and back adjustment for perfect tailored fit
Soft loop harness attachment point
High Spec Auto Inflating 150N Lifejacket, fitted with sprayhood
UML Pro-Sensor activation head with visible indicator to show activation status
Aquaspec AQ98 high intensity flashing light
Thigh straps
'Manual Only' firing head supplied to order
Available in 3 sizes
12-05-2009 12:44 AM
jrd22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garffin View Post
You might also want to check out some PFDs that are used in the white water industry. I know my PFD that I use is awesome. This one is almost like the one I have.

[IMG][/IMG]
Looks like a good PFD (although it won't keep your face out of the water if you are unconscious). But seriously, are you really going to wear that when the temp. is in the 80's, or 90's. I wouldn't wear it, so it wouldn't do me any good.
12-04-2009 10:04 PM
painkiller
Quote:
Originally Posted by silverbranch View Post
Maybe, like me, the OP can't swim. I have inflatables too, but I wear the non-inflatable almost all the time. If you ever find that lifejacket, let me know. I'll buy one too.
Here's a YMCA near you: ymca loc: Manassas, VA - Google Maps

Learn to swim!
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