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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum > Wood vs. Fiberglass
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Thread: Wood vs. Fiberglass Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
07-13-2011 04:50 PM
Matti Miettunen
Alden Triangle


[IMG][IMG][/QUOTE]

Hi!

Do you still have this boat?

We bought one from Marblehead around 1999 and brought her to Finland.

She is one of the series built by Graves 1927.

We had her totally restaured by S & S Yachts, Kotka, Finland. We named her "Electra", we are not 100 % sure if this was the original name in 1927.

We made small modifications inside to put in a Yanmar diesel (9.9 hp) but otherwise kept all the original riggings etc. The deck is now made of Oregon Pine.

A beautifull boat and a pleasure to sail her here in the Finnish Archipelago.

This link is to a picture when we tested her in Kotka (without sails) in freezing temperature.

Red Sky Craft

Best regards

Matti Miettunen
12-27-2009 05:14 PM
Rogertheengineer
Wood v GRP

In England one of the great dinghy designers was Ian Proctor. One of his enduring designs is a 16'boat - The Wayfarer- designed some 50yrs ago. It is mainly sailed in Canada, UK, Denmark and Holland plus a few other countries. It is a One Class Design.

Originally it was designed to be built in Wood with plywood on a frame resulting in a shape with chines. With difficulties of renewable wood and costs it was soon produced in GRP but had to be the same weight to comply with the one design class.

The wood ones always out performed the GRP ones. To improve the performance of the GRP boats they made them a sandwich GRP construction. All the boats had similar hull shapes.

In the end the best helms soon learnt to search for the best condition/latest wooden boat they could find. As they stopped building the wooden boats in 1988 this was considered bad for the class. In 2007 it was decided to make a new GRP boat to be as fast (or faster) than the best wooden boat. To achieve this they had to alter the hull shape slightly.

We did the 2009 Nationals and other competitions and generally found a number of helms in the latest GRP boat were getting results that were better than we expected.

Conclusion - in one design with shape and weight limits a wooden boat performs better than a GRP one. I believe this is because wood is inherently stiffer and faster for any given weight than GRP. Obviously Kevlar or Carbon Fibre would influence this (not allowed in a Wayfarer).

For the 2010 season we have now sold our beloved wooden Wayfarer and ordered one of the newer shaped GRP sandwich construction Wayfarer.

One disadvantage of GRP is that with age they do get heavier as they absorb an amount of moisture while a wooden boat with regular investment (painting/varnish) and drying out during the winter can be keep as new.
12-10-2009 11:25 AM
SecondWindNC Wow, gorgeous! Congrats.
12-10-2009 10:50 AM
AndrewMac She's plank on frame. The coldmolded boat was a sheath over the old plank on frame construction. A number of people on the thread warned against this method (with good reason as I understand there are a lot of poorly conceived/executed examples of this). Partly as a result of the warnings I got here, I spent a LOT of time researching the means and methods used on the "coldmolded" version and got very comfortable with the quality and durability of the workmanship on the hull. Unfortunately, the owner had used inferior plywood for the decks and cockpit when he did the rebuild in 1991 and that is where the rot was setting in.

The one other boat that I ended up considering very seriously was the Burgess designed Atlantic. Basically, I couldn't escape my love of the classic old lines/overhangs and was prepared to sacrifice some performance and comfort as a result. What I found interesting was that, of that generation of designers, it seemed that Burgess, more than most, managed to combine the aesthetic of the day with more modern performance characteristics. I ultimately concluded though, that the Atlantic made sense if I was going to race her a lot, but that the Triangle was going to be a more comfortable daysailer that I could also enter into some of the classic boats races around me in Maine....
12-09-2009 09:56 PM
sailhog Nice boats, folks!
12-09-2009 08:36 PM
mitiempo Sweet!
12-09-2009 08:14 PM
mstern Holy smokes, that's a gorgeous boat.
12-09-2009 06:22 PM
cormeum
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
VERY pretty boat! Congratulations.. obviously the roadblocks put up by the first seller were, in the end, fortuitous!!
Couldn't agree more. Is this one cold molded or plank-on-frame?
12-09-2009 05:29 PM
marujosortudo She's gorgeous! Now, you have the whole winter to get her 100% ship-shape for the spring....just like me . Actually, I think it's the perfect time to buy a boat if you can deal with delayed gratification. You can address all the surveyor's recommendations and do any upgrades or cosmetic work you want, so she'll be totally ready when spring rolls around.
12-09-2009 05:26 PM
imagine2frolic I hope everything works out for you. I would've walked too. Her pic on the mooring was pretty, but undersail.......OMG!........i2f
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